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Professional Engineering Certification  
User currently offlineAirxLiban From Lebanon, joined Oct 2003, 4511 posts, RR: 53
Posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1998 times:

I am graduating in May 2005 (providing that I don't fail anything) and am considering getting PE certification.

Could anyone shed some light on the benefits and detriments to getting such a certification?

I am an Industrial & Systems Engineering major and understand that the PE certification test is a 4 hour ordeal...

4 hours in general engineering and 4 hours specific to your course of study.

I am particularly figuring out what is involved in the 4 hours of general engineering.

Thanks for any replies.


PARIS, FRANCE...THE BEIRUT OF EUROPE.
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7513 posts, RR: 23
Reply 1, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1992 times:

If your degree is a 4-year degree (Bachelor's), you will need to take what is known as either the E.I.T. (Engineer-In-Training) or F.E. (Fundamentals of Engineering) exam. It is an 8-hour exam which consists of multiple choice problems covering many subjects taught in any engineering curriculum including math, chemistry, physics. A passing grade in most states is a score of 70 or higher. After passing the exam, you will receive what is known as an E.I.T. certificate.

For the P.E. (Professional Engineering) exam, you will need 4 years of work experience along with your E.I.T. certificate. At present, a Master's Degree in Engineering of any type usually eliminates only one year of work experience as a requirement. Unlike the E.I.T. exams (which are one engineering discipline fits all), the P.E. exams are discipline-specific (examples include civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, structural (CA only)). In most disciplines, the exam is an 8-hour exam with a mixture of multiple-choice and objective problems. Unlike the E.I.T. exam problems, the P.E. problems are more in-depth calculations. A typical P.E. exam will have 8 problems whereas the E.I.T. exam has 140 problems.

Check with your state Board of Registration for the latest requirements, fees exam dates and so forth. In most states, the E.I.T. and P.E. exams are given twice a year: usually in April and October.

[Edited 2005-01-09 02:11:06]


"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offlineFlyVirgin744 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 1313 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1977 times:

If you want to be paid more and get a "real" engineering job, you damn well should. A BA degree in engineering without certification is like becoming a medical doctor but never getting your practice licensure.

However, you say your degree is in Industrial systems, this sect seems to have the least amount of professional engineers simply because your classes are generally different from the other disciplines.

If you have taken statics, strength/mechanics of materials, dynamics, and thermo, you might as well. If your school didn't requires those, it will probably be very tough for you to pass the EIT.



Sometimes I go about in pity for myself and all the while a great wind carries me across the sky.
User currently offlineDelta-flyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 2676 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1976 times:

Just to add to PHLBOS's excellent post, the PE exam I took many years ago in Mechanical Engineering had about 10 problems of which 4 or 5 had to be solved -- but they were very in-depth design problems, the sort you would encounter in everyday work.

The benefits? If you are a working on public projects (roads, buildings, ski lifts, etc.) you need to have a PE to sign off on your work. In Aerospace, you really don't need one if you work in an engineering department with formal procedures. I got my PE for the hell of it, just in case I may find it handy for a career change.

My advice, though, is get it while you are young - it will only be tougher later. Take the EIT exam as soon as you can - I think you can take it in your senior year.

Pete


User currently offlineFlyVirgin744 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 1313 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1972 times:

Yes Delta-Flyer is correct, you can take the EIT your senior year.


Sometimes I go about in pity for myself and all the while a great wind carries me across the sky.
User currently offlineAirxLiban From Lebanon, joined Oct 2003, 4511 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1955 times:

PHLBOS, FlyVS744 and delta flyer, thanks for your responses.

If you have taken statics, strength/mechanics of materials, dynamics, and thermo, you might as well. If your school didn't requires those, it will probably be very tough for you to pass the EIT.

Actually, this was what was worrying me. Other than statics, I haven't taken much of anything from traditional engineering disciplines. No mechanics/materials and no dynamics past the basic rotational motion that you learn in introductory physics.

I would not pass that section of the test then.

I wonder how many industrial engineers go to the EIT and PE?



PARIS, FRANCE...THE BEIRUT OF EUROPE.
User currently offlineFlyVirgin744 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 1313 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 1936 times:

According to my school's ISE website:

only 10% of the members of the Institute of Industrial Engineering are PEs

Here's a link to the website for more info:

http://www.ise.ufl.edu/techelectives/EI-PE.htm



Sometimes I go about in pity for myself and all the while a great wind carries me across the sky.
User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7513 posts, RR: 23
Reply 7, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1917 times:

Other than statics, I haven't taken much of anything from traditional engineering disciplines. No mechanics/materials and no dynamics past the basic rotational motion that you learn in introductory physics.

I'm not sure about the content of engineering curriculums offered at colleges and universities outside of the U.S.A., but I do know that nearly every school in the U.S.A. that offers some form of a 4-year undergraduate engineering curriculum usually requires a course in dynamics and a mechanics of materials (a.k.a. strength of materials) course. These courses are usually taken during an engineering student's sophmore year. I do believe that in order for the 4-year degree to have A.B.E.T. accreditation, these courses must be included in any engineering curriculum.

BTW, A.B.E.T. stand for Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

The way I see it, you have a few choices in terms of preparation to take the E.I.T. exam;

1. You could attend the needed courses at either your present institution or a local community college. Note that course transcripts are required on the exam application.

2. Additional work experience can be taken into consideration for the approval to take the exam. All exam applications are subject to approval by the local Board.

3. Some schools may offer refresher courses on taking the E.I.T. exam. This course can be helpful for those who have either been out of school for a while or feel that they might need to sharpen their skills in some areas they're either weak on or weren't fully exposed to.

Given your scenario, option 3 may be your best bet.

Another helpful source is the Engineer In Training Reference Manual written by Michael R. Lindeburg, P.E. Professional Publications, Inc. is the publisher. Do a web search for Professional Publications and you can probably order this manual along with any other refernce materials you may need. The above-described manual clearly deals with the types of problems one will encounter on the exams.


[Edited 2005-01-10 13:50:29]


"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7772 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

My brother sat for the PE exam this past October and passed. He took his fundamentals of engineering exam during his senior year in college.

For him there is not much of a benefit to having a PE as he is an environmental/water systems engineer and works in a medium sized engineering firm. So there is somebody that can sign off on all the work the company does. Though I suppose if that person is out he can now do so.

The benefit for him is that it got him a marginal increase in pay at his current job, but in the future it will give him more flexibility in what he can do. As he moves up in experience he might well end up working at a place where he will be the head engineer, or if he goes off on his own.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
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