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What Is The Biggest Planet In The Solar System?  
User currently offlineAir Taiwan From Australia, joined Dec 1999, 1518 posts, RR: 4
Posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2676 times:

I just saw on TV (the Weakest Link, Goodbye... hehe) that the biggest planet in the Solar System is Saturn!

I always thought Jupiter is the biggest...

Am I wrong?

Jimmy

36 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2632 times:

No, the biggest (in size, maybe not in wight) is indeed Jupiter.

NoUFO



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 47
Reply 2, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2616 times:

Saturn is not only NOT the biggest (it is the second biggest), but it is also the least dense of all the planets. It's density is only 60% that of water. So, given a big enough ocean, saturn would float on it like a partially deflated beach ball.

User currently offlineJAL From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 5092 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2615 times:

No, Jupiter is indeed the solar system biggest planet.

I didn't know that Saturn is the least dense planet?



Work Hard But Play Harder
User currently offlineG-KIRAN From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2000, 736 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2610 times:

Jupiter is the biggest although some suspect that there maybe a giant planet 10 bigger then Jupiter far out beyond Pluto.This would account for the strange irregular orbits of Neptune and Uranus.Initially they thought that Pluto was causing this,but they ruled it out because Pluto is very very small.

User currently offlineGo Canada! From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2955 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2594 times:

Saturn is once the rings are included, perhaps that what the weakest link was getting at.


It is amazing what can be accomplised when nobody takes the credit
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 47
Reply 6, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2590 times:

Go Canada needs to Go Study some Astronomy. The rings of Saturn are nothing more than rocks and chunks of ice, with lots of space between the pieces (contrary to belief, the rings are NOT solid). If you were to take the entire mass of the rings, and lumped it all together, you would still come up with a body only about 2/3rds the size of the earths Moon.

Hardly enough to upseat Jupiter as the King of the Planets.


User currently offlineJetService From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 4798 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2586 times:

How could they screw something like that up? It's not even close!!! Maybe there's a technicality involved, for instance, Jupiter is not really a planet, because...

Kind of like Massachusetts isn't really a state, but a commonwealth..blah, blah, blah......

Very strange.





"Shaddap you!"
User currently offlineOO-VEG From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 1124 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2585 times:

In mass and weight those rings of Saturn are not that interesting. BUT if you look at the space those rings take (no looking at how much empty space there is between those rocks), Saturn may be bigger.

However, I have heard there are more planets in the solar system with rings (not so much and beautiful as Saturn but they are still rings). Isn't Jupiter also one of those planets???? If so, that may make Jupiter the largest again.


User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4224 posts, RR: 37
Reply 9, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2582 times:

Jupiter indeed does have a ring. I have heard the Planet X theory many times, but nothing has come of it i dont believe.


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13241 posts, RR: 77
Reply 10, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2582 times:

Uranus has rings too, but they are vertical due to the planet being effectively turned on it's side, including the orbits of it's Moons.
Neptune has faint rings, seems to be a feature of gas giant planets.
Saturn's rings have been around for 'only' 3 million years, and will slowly ebb and erode away over many millions of years.



User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 11, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2579 times:

Jupiter has more mass than Saturn and does have rings.
Maybe they took the diameter including the ring system. If so, Saturn may be slightly larger.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineGo canada! From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2955 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2575 times:

thats what i think they were getting at, Saturn may just be slightly larger when taking in the ring system of calculating planet size.

My Great-Uncle owns a local oberservatory, perhaps it is you who need to study your books?

I have studied astromony and have a GCSE in it and I think its a close call, if u just take mass of the planet then Jupiter win, however, i can see were the Weakest Link is coming from, its a shame you can not see beyond the trees-that makes it difficult for you to look at the planets.



It is amazing what can be accomplised when nobody takes the credit
User currently offlineTransactoid From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 788 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2568 times:

Perhaps they just got it wrong?

They'll probably bring the person back on the show, or indicate their error on a future show. It's happened on Millionaire, and that Greed show....


User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7802 posts, RR: 16
Reply 14, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2565 times:

That is just hogwash. The ring system is seperate from the planet... they are just orbiting satellites like the moon. Interstingly enough Saturn would float in water, its density is less than 1.

As for planet X, who knows. There is a lot of research going into objects beyond Jupiter. They are not really certain of the extent of the Kupier belt in terms of mass and size. There could be a brown drawf sitting out there too, or dark matter.

It still could be that Pluto is an escaped moon of Neptune or just a large Kuiper object, which would explain the eccentric orbit. Who knows.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineAn-225 From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 3950 posts, RR: 40
Reply 15, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2559 times:

Jupiter is the biggest one, come on. It's elementary astronomy.


Money does not bring you happiness. But it's better to cry in your own private limo than on a cold bus stop.
User currently offlineN863DA From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 48 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2550 times:

Ah yes... but don't you know that 'Go Canada!' has a GCSE in it (a qualification akin to a high-school diploma that you get at age 16) so he must know ALL about it. How foolish of elder people in their thirties (me not included) to think that they could compete with a GCSE!!!!

FLY DELTA JETS and sail UNITED STATES LINES



N 8 6 3 D A


User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 47
Reply 17, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2544 times:

Oh Pardon my ignorance, I only took a year of college astronomy, and studied every astronomy book I could get my hands on for some three years. That still can't compete with your distinguished GCSE.

But can you tell me, without looking it up:

What the brightest star in the sky is?

How many constellations there are?

What the difference between a magnitude -1 and a magnitude 3 star are?

What the difference between apparent and absolute magnitude are?

What the next closet star is to the earth besides the Sun?

What a parsec is?

What an Astronomical Unit is?

What declination and right ascention are?

What the ecliptic is?

What parallax is?

What precession is?

What proper motion is?

What the Red Shift is?

What the largest and smallest constellations are?

What constellation Aldebaran is in?

What a variable is?

What constellation has the starts Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka in it, and what those three stars are?

What perhelion and aphelion are?

What transit means?

Shall I go on?



User currently offlineSamurai 777 From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 2458 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2545 times:

Whoever did that TV show wasn't reading even basic astronomy.

Jupiter is 318 times the mass of Earth, while Saturn is a distant second, at 95 Earths. 95 Earths may seem heavy, but even though Saturn's diameter is about 130,000 km across, it's made largely of liquid helium surrounding a possible rocky core no larger than Earth. Helium, as we know, is a very light gas, ideal for filling ballons (or temporarily altering your voice for hilarious results, too). That's why Saturn's light enough to float in water.

All of the gas giants in our solar system have rings. Jupiter's ring is extremely diffuse and wasn't discovered until the Voyager 2 space probe took a picture of Jupiter being backlit by the sun in 1981. Uranus' rings weren't discovered until 1977, when a flying obervatory aboard a C-141 or a C-5 (can't remember which a/c type) saw stars dimming and brightening before and after Uranus passed in front of them. Neptune has a partial ring system. Saturn's rings are indeed largest and most beautiful by far and has very complex patterns. When Galileo Galilei discovered Saturn's rings through his incredible invention, the telescope, he initially thought Saturn had ears!


User currently offlineN863DA From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 48 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2541 times:

Go Canada! should be able to answer those without blinking!

His wonderful GCSE should outshine your entire year of college in a flash!

(BTW, "Go Canada!", incase you don't get it, I do not think too highly of your GCSE compared to Matt D's measly year...)

FLY DELTA JETS and sail UNITED STATES LINES



N 8 6 3 D A


User currently offlineJetService From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 4798 posts, RR: 11
Reply 20, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2529 times:

Forget the ring bulls#!t! Jupiter is twice the mass of all the other planets put together!! helllll-ooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


"Shaddap you!"
User currently offlineFlight152 From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 3407 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2530 times:

Air Taiwan-
That weakest link is a good show, with Anne Robinson. As she might say... "Who left their brains at home?"

You are the weakest link........ goodbye.


User currently offlineAir Taiwan From Australia, joined Dec 1999, 1518 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 2518 times:

I haven't seen the UK version of "the weakest link"... but the one I's talking about is the one hosted by Cornelia Francis (sp??) here in OZ...

sounds like that they've got the same personality though... hehe

Jimmy  Smile/happy/getting dizzy



User currently offlineCYKA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2517 times:

Are you into astronomy?...

User currently offlineGo canada! From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2955 posts, RR: 11
Reply 24, posted (13 years 5 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2511 times:

perhaps some people need to learn who to read before they ask questions...

when did I say that a GCSE is more important than a college degree? When, please inform me, since you know so much that should be easy for you.

No please inform me, come on you have made a judgement that I have said I know more about this than you all do, i simply laid out my basis that I have an elementary understanding of astromony as I am used to utter idiots jumping down peoples thoarts just because they are under thirty!

I simply said that I could see where the TV show was coming from.

Whilst i understand that a GCSE doesnt beat a college course, it is still useful and worthwhile and is probably more that some of the uneducated persons using this site have.

so I will answer most of the questions,sorry i havent done this instantly as I have uni exams to complete...i hope those who ahev used higher education can realise that I can not sit an a pc all day.

anyway here goes, by the way the answers are not in order and are the ones I can remember without looking up textbooks:

Nearest Star apart from the sun is Proxima Centauri, which is one part of the triple star Alpha Centauri, which is about 40 trillion km (25 trillion mi) from the earth.

ecliptic :its the apparent 'great circle' annual path of the sun, the name is because eclipses occur only when the moon is on or near this path.

Constellations-88 groupings of stars on the celst sphere

a parsec is a unit of measurement used for stellar distances, its a blend word of parallax and second

parallax:its the apparent displacement of the position of a celestial object on the cel sphere when you view it from two different postions.

An AU(asto unit) is the unti of distance used when measuring the obits and trajectories within the solar system

Aldebaran is in Taurus

The 3-star magnitude is darker, i Think
The brightest star apart from the sun is Sirius(-1.6)

Absolute magnitude is opposite to apparent magnitude, it indicates the brightness that a star would have if it were placed at a distance from the earth of 32.6 light-years.

declination is to do with the equator

i admit i cant answre all without looking, however, since I never asked for the questions and since i never said that a GCSE is better than a uni course I think I have done quite well.


I would like to see N 8 6 3 D A answer the rest of the questions since he seems to know soo much.

krgds



.






















It is amazing what can be accomplised when nobody takes the credit
25 Post contains images WN boy : What the brightest star in the sky is? My guess would be the sun. How many constellations there are? I believe TWA retired the last Constellation oper
26 Post contains images Matt D : WNBoy: A+ for you. I hereby award you your unconditional GCSE. You are an intelligent person indeed. Who said that my quizzes were hard?
27 Post contains images Flight152 : WN boy- How many constellations there are? I believe TWA retired the last Constellation operating in passenger service in the early 1960's. I think Ma
28 Transactoid : Uggh...did nobody read my post? Obiviously someone simply didn't do enough research and formed the question incorrectly. *IF* it was an error, it will
29 LOT767-300ER : Wasent this guy asking what the capital of Virginia is on a diffrent post? And now he asks what the biggest planet is in our solar system? Air Taiwan
30 Samurai 777 : CYKA - Glad you asked. Yes, I've been interested in astronomy. MattD asked us these: "But can you tell me, without looking it up:" I can, for moost of
31 SSTjumbo : Here's one to run across you guys. Jupiter has been occasionly classified as a star for some weird reason. Figured I'd tell you guys that if it wasn't
32 Go canada! : i believe you!
33 JFKspotter : Samurai 777 (or anyone else): Isn't it the other way around? Aphelion being the farthest away from the Sun, Perihelion being the closest? Just wonderi
34 Samurai 777 : SSTJumbo - Jupiter isn't truly a star, but I can see where you're coming from. Some scientists believe that Jupiter is a "failed star", meaning that t
35 Samurai 777 : JFKSpotter - You're right! I got THAT one mixed up. Thanks for correcting me on this one. When you think about it, "Peri" comes from an ancient Greek
36 GDB : If Jupiter wasn't around, neither would we be. The Huge planet's mass has acted like a cosmic hoover sucking in, or deflecting, many comets and other
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