Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Your Thoughts On Dostoyevski  
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2847 posts, RR: 4
Posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1712 times:

I'm sure most of us have at some point heard of the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevski, many people have recommended me to read his work "The Idiot" and maybe even more so his book "The karamov brothers" (i believe that's what it's called). The last one have even been for me referred to as "THE book" to read. Now, those of you have read these titles or anything else by Dostoyevski, what is your take on him? Brilliant or not good at all?

20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePelican From Germany, joined Apr 2004, 2531 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1710 times:

Some years ago I read "The Karamazov brothers" (I don't know the English title). And I've to say although Dostoevsky isn't the easiest to read - I think Tolstoy is easier to read -the book gives an unique impression of Tsarist times of Russia. He potrays complicated characters in a very impressive way. Hence I can recommend it to you.

pelican


User currently offlineLekohawk From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 159 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1698 times:

Quoting Pelican (Reply 1):
Some years ago I read "The Karamazov brothers" (I don't know the English title). And I've to say although Dostoevsky isn't the easiest to read - I think Tolstoy is easier to read

In the States it's called "The Brothers Karamazov", which I presume is the title for most (if not all) English translations... feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

As for Dostoevsky v. Tolstoy? Tolstoy... but not by much.



If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
User currently offlineKieron747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1685 times:

I recently finished reading 'Crime and Punishment' and would recommend it to anyone. It may not be that easy to read, and it is damn long, but once you get into in it's very hard to put down.

It's certainly a book that makes you think...

Kieron747


User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1676 times:

Quoting Kieron747 (Reply 3):
I recently finished reading 'Crime and Punishment' and would recommend it to anyone. It may not be that easy to read, and it is damn long, but once you get into in it's very hard to put down.

That's in my top 5.

All of Dos's work is first rate. Notes from Underground, Poor Folk and other stories, the Gambler, The Possessed...in addition to those mentioned above.

I'd rank him as one of the 2 or 3 best writers of all time. It's a shame that I cannot read him in his native Russian, as I'm sure some of the wordplay is lost in translation.

Logan


User currently offlineTs-ior From Tunisia, joined Oct 2001, 3450 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1673 times:

It's worth reading it. It's an engaged, left, literature !!! Good reading  Wink

User currently offlineKieron747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1672 times:

Quoting Logan22L (Reply 4):
It's a shame that I cannot read him in his native Russian, as I'm sure some of the wordplay is lost in translation.

Agreed, I was thinking that as I was reading it. I'm not sure however, if all editions are translated by the same person. The edition I have is translated by a Scottish academic called David McDuff and I appreciated his style very much.



I enjoy reading literature from the 19th century and found his translation inkeeping with the style.

Regards

Kieron747


User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1665 times:

Quoting Kieron747 (Reply 6):
The edition I have is translated by a Scottish academic called David McDuff

Sounds familiar; I think he did several works of his, but there have been several other translators. I've read C&P by two different translators, although the names escape me right now. Perhaps I should bring all my books to work so I can fairly contribute to this. Wink

Logan


User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1662 times:

I read about 3 pages of "Crime and Punishment" and gave up. Admittedly it was a VERY old translation, but it was SO awful, dreary and hard to enjoy. Maybe I should try again with a more modern translation. On the other hand, I'm not a real fan of gritty tales of urban grimness in any language.

User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11446 posts, RR: 76
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1658 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Kieron747 (Reply 3):
'Crime and Punishment' and would recommend it to anyone.

Same here.

Dostoyevskiy was an excellent writer and had the advantage of living in that environment. I don't know if I'd call him a grimmer Dickens, but the thought crossed my mind.



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1657 times:

Quoting JGPH1A (Reply 8):
Admittedly it was a VERY old translation, but it was SO awful, dreary and hard to enjoy.

Spoken like a VERY old A.netter. old  old  old  old 

Not surprised you didn't like it, you seem more like the Jaqueline Susan type. Wink

Come on JG, give it another go. It's not "Curious George Rides on a Firetruck," but it's right up there.


User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1655 times:

Quoting Logan22L (Reply 10):
Not surprised you didn't like it, you seem more like the Jaqueline Susan type.

Come on JG, give it another go. It's not "Curious George Rides on a Firetruck," but it's right up there.

Not Jaqui Susann ! Jackie Collins though, good for reading on holiday, in hammocks slung between palm trees (I actually did that once !).

Curious George ? Oh please, spare me such simian caperings ! I much prefer the erudite and intellectually stimulating saga of The House at Pooh Corner.


User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12382 posts, RR: 47
Reply 12, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1640 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

I think he's very highly skilled, but he's just not a team player. They'd be better off without him!


Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineVulindlela From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 473 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1617 times:

About the old translations-If you find the language to be pretty dull, or if you are going to read Dostoevski for the first time in English, you should get the Richard Pevear/Larissa Volokhonsky translation. They are husband/wife professors of Russian literature-one native Russian and one American, and they make for the best translators. I am pretty sure they have done all of Dostoevski's books now, as well as some Tolstoy and others.
I read their version of the Brothers Karamazov and Notes From Underground. They were both great. I have picked up older translations and compared them page by page, and the newer ones are hugely different. I don't speak Russian either, so I can't say one is truer than the other, but Pevear/Volokhonsky use much brighter language and are more loose in their punctuation, sentence structure, etc. It makes a massive difference. Next time you are at the bookstore, just pick up one of each of the same book, and compare the first page of any chapter. The improvements can be seen immediately.
-Kevin



"If you take everything I've accomplished in my entire life and condense it down into 1 day, it looks decent!"
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1613 times:

Quoting Vulindlela (Reply 13):
one native Russian and one American

I bet I can guess which one is which. Wink

Kevin, thanks so much for your advice. I will no doubt search for these translations.

John


User currently offlineVulindlela From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 473 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1611 times:

One other thing-Those new translations are more expensive. My copy of The Brothers Karamazov says US $17 on the back, whereas an old classics edition of it is probably about $6 or 7. But they are well worth it, and they are much better quality paper, binding as well.

Finally-A quote from the back of The Brothers Karamazov:
"It may well be that Dostoevsky's world, with all its resourceful energies of life and language, is only now-through the medium of this new translation-beginning to come home to the English-speaking reader.
-NY review of books

-Kevin



"If you take everything I've accomplished in my entire life and condense it down into 1 day, it looks decent!"
User currently offlineKieron747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1609 times:

So, bearing all this in mind, I am looking to read more by Dostoevsky, can anyone suggest which book I go for next bearing in mind I have only read Crime and Punishment?

Thanks,

Kieron747


User currently offlineVulindlela From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 473 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1609 times:

Logan22L-
Good job if you guessed  Wink It usually is an American man and Russian woman isn't it? -not very often the other way around.

-Kevin



"If you take everything I've accomplished in my entire life and condense it down into 1 day, it looks decent!"
User currently offlineVulindlela From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 473 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1604 times:

Kieron747-
The Brothers Karamazov is to most people his greatest novel. But if you want to read something shorter to see if you might be interested in others, you could try (what many say is his first great early work) The Double, or Notes from Underground. Both of these are very short compared to his few massive novels, but still very telling about the writer.
-Kevin



"If you take everything I've accomplished in my entire life and condense it down into 1 day, it looks decent!"
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1601 times:

Quoting Kieron747 (Reply 16):
So, bearing all this in mind, I am looking to read more by Dostoevsky, can anyone suggest which book I go for next bearing in mind I have only read Crime and Punishment?

"Brothers" is quite long, but, if you made it through C&P, that shouldn't deter you. Notes From Underground is very personal, and an influential book for many writers. The Gambler is a slightly lesser-known work, and one of my favorites.

There are also several books of stories.

Just read 'em all, Kieron. Smile

Logan


User currently offlinePendrilsaint From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 685 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1601 times:

Kieron 747, how much time do you have haha? If you have a good amount of reading planned ahead I'm going to suggest the brothers K as a good follow up. I don't think it was quite as riveting as Crime and Punishment, but it is definitely a great read. If you want some less intense reading, pick up a collection of his short stories (Which MUST include Notes from the Underground, which one can argue is one of the most important literary works in recent centuries). I know it's a sentimental story, but 'White Nights' is also a good short story.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Your Thoughts On AK Senator Stevens posted Wed Apr 5 2006 23:21:24 by Bushpilot
Your Thoughts On Alpizar's Shooting posted Fri Dec 9 2005 17:48:28 by Tbar220
Your Thoughts On DoubleClick posted Wed Sep 21 2005 14:41:37 by UTA_flyinghigh
Your Thoughts On Websites Like Iwon.com? posted Sun Jul 10 2005 06:41:57 by Lehpron
Your Thoughts On Dostoyevski posted Mon May 9 2005 10:47:00 by Mika
Your Thoughts On The New Dr Who posted Sat Mar 26 2005 20:51:48 by Myt332
Ryan Seacrest: Your Thoughts On Him? posted Sat Mar 19 2005 02:15:45 by ConcordeBoy
Gloria Allred: Your Thoughts On Her? posted Wed Mar 16 2005 21:52:44 by ConcordeBoy
Your Thoughts On Moscow & St. Petersburg? posted Thu Feb 3 2005 05:13:50 by ClassicLover
Your Thoughts On New TV Shows posted Mon Jan 24 2005 11:58:00 by VH-KCT*