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Moving To A Different Country  
User currently offlineMuddydwagon From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 657 posts, RR: 4
Posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1549 times:

Hello all, as I am sitting here getting some stuff in order for my move to Sweden I was wondering if any a.netters have moved from one country to another? Please share your experiences where you came from and where you went. How bad was the culture shock? To keep it short I married a Swede that I met on the internet many moons ago after a few years living in the states we decided to look in to going to Sweden to live. In February we bought a small store there and I am moving there as soon as I get my permit.

Cheers Pete

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7405 posts, RR: 50
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1547 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Enjoy the land of beautiful blondes. Bundle up.


Made from jets!
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1531 times:

In the late 80's I was transfered from my job in New York to Dusseldorf.

It was a lot of fun, I enjoyed it very much. After a year and a half in Germany I was again transferred, this time to Bern in Switzerland.

When I came back to the states I went back to the University to get my MA and PhD.Whilst at school, I worked as a consultant for a firm that aides Americans who are being sent over to work in Europe (mostly GM/Ford/Chrysler and their suppliers) as well as working with those coming to the US.

It was a great time, and made me understand the world in a very different light!

Enjoy yourself!


User currently offlineAirxLiban From Lebanon, joined Oct 2003, 4507 posts, RR: 53
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1518 times:

I have moved before...Greece to Lebanon, Lebanon to Cyprus, Cyprus to the UK, the UK to Turkey, Turkey to the US and now in September, US back to the UK.

I have no doubt that you will like your move...



PARIS, FRANCE...THE BEIRUT OF EUROPE.
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1517 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Hi Pete,

Many years ago, I left the US to spend a year in a country overseas whose language I didn't speak a word of. As you can imagine, it was difficult to adapt at first, but my language skills came along and I got by ok. "Sink or swim", as they say.

The worst part of not speaking the language was how isolated it made me feel. After all, if you're living in a city where you don't understand a word anyone says, nobody has any apparent personality, and they all seem exactly the same...kind of like a really bad Stephen King movie.

My advice...keep your chin up, and remember...you'll get the hang of it before long, and will eventually come to understand and even relate to the citizens of the country.


2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlinePilotsmoe From United States of America, joined May 2005, 249 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1506 times:

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 1):
Enjoy the land of beautiful blondes. Bundle up.

Nah, redheads are better!! Irish beauties

And they speak English!!

[Edited 2005-05-18 04:18:21]

User currently offlineMuddydwagon From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 657 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1491 times:

Quoting Pilotsmoe (Reply 5):
Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 1):
Enjoy the land of beautiful blondes. Bundle up.

Nah, redheads are better!! Irish beauties

Hmm my Swedish born wife is a Redhead LOL.


Great replies, 2H4 you hit the nail on the head with that the language is my biggest fear going over there. Since I will be working in retail when I get there

Cheers, Pete


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1481 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



While you're in Sweden, remember to visit Airliners.net headquarters in Luleå:






See the Database Editors in action:





...And if you're lucky, catch a rare glimpse of the server:

http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/img/assets/4944/reactor.jpg


Hope to see you there!


2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineFlyMIA From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7125 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1477 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):

Now that was funny  Smile !



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineWunala From Australia, joined Mar 2005, 950 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1453 times:

yeah, I have moved from Ireland to England, then to Australia, where I now live.

Its strange what you miss at first, certain chips, chocolate, brands, but then you throw yourself into local life and not look back. I ahve been here about 6 years, but there are still boxes of stuff in Ireland and England, that were important back then, but the next time I go back I will end up binning without a second thought.

Good luck with your move, give it a go, and enjoy the new lifestyle (and try to stop converting back into USD from local currency asap. You are earing local currency now, so that is what everything should be based on.

Cheers


User currently offlineAR1300 From Argentina, joined Feb 2005, 1740 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1448 times:

Buenos Aires to Chicago and back after three years.And in a few months to NYC....
It was really cool.It helps a lot to learn another lenguage and to meet a different culture.Good luck!!

Mike



They don't call us Continental for nothing.
User currently offlineToulouse From Switzerland, joined Apr 2005, 2758 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1446 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 4):
The worst part of not speaking the language was how isolated it made me feel. After all, if you're living in a city where you don't understand a word anyone says, nobody has any apparent personality, and they all seem exactly the same...kind of like a really bad Stephen King movie.

My advice...keep your chin up, and remember...you'll get the hang of it before long, and will eventually come to understand and even relate to the citizens of the country.

Very well said 2H4.

I've moved from Ireland to Spain, to Switzerland (numerous short-term work stays) and then to France. Language is a hindrance at the beginning, but as 2H4 says, chin up. As your language skills improve (and they will, even if you don't make too much of an effort) you'll find yourself integrating more easily, meeting more locals and starting to realise that in the end of the day, we're all human beings and we aren't that different from one another.
Do though, IMO, try to integrate. Mix with the locals, instead of searching for an Irish pub or something similar where you'll feel more comfortable cause you'll find lots of English speakers... that I always avoid for a couple of years when I move country and don't be embarrassed with your bad language skills at the beginning... if people laugh at your accent or mistakes you make, they are usually laughing because they find them charming, and not stupid! In Spain I remember thinking a very elegant woman was telling me for a whole week that she was contipated! In the end it was just a common cold (constipada). I once tried to by a piece of furniture telling the saleswoman that I wanted a chest with three "balls/testicles" (cojones, instead of cAjones) and I frequently ordered a coffee and a couple of joint for breakfast (still confuse that one... porros/porras, one is a joint, the other is a typical Spanish breakfast type of fried pastry).
Enjoy yourself. I've never been to Sweden, but it's a country I'd love to visit. It's supposed to be very beautiful.
Good luck and bon voyage!



Long live Aer Lingus!
User currently offlineDABZF From Germany, joined Mar 2004, 1200 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1448 times:

I moved from Finland to England, London to be exact, when I was 22.
It was all very fast, I applied a job and after month and a half I was there!

To be honest it was a shock for a young guy in the beginning! I was sharing a house with 3 other people which I didn't really enjoy (I prefer to live by my own) - specially as I didn't got a long with one of the room mates! And the worst was that there was no bloody heating in the house! It literally didn't matter if you left you left your milk on the kitchen table or if you put it in the fridge - it was 4 degrees centigrade either way!  cold  Worst is that these English people I was living with didn't bother about it and they kept saying to me that "you are from the north. You should be used to the cold" - NO! I might be from the north and yes to a certain degree I'm used to the cold but more than that I'm used to protect myself against the cold! Damn, I just realized how I'm traumatized by that experience living in a freezing house!  Wink

Oh, by the way, don't worry Pete! In Sweden they know what heating is!  Wink

Anyway, I got settled in quite well, made few mates and life was peachy. I ended up being there only a year though as my old employer from Finland offered me job which I couldn't refuse!

I was in Finland for 3 years until they sent me to CPH... In Denmark the "culture shock" was not as bad (and I was 5 years older as well) so the settling down wasn't that bad! Although (a dejavu) in the beginning (only a temporarily solution from the beginning) I moved in to a house that I shared with 3 other people!!! And it was bloody freezing because the owner didn't allow any heating in my room when I wasn't there! Grrrrr! After I got my own place to live in things been really good! I have a hard time to learn the language but everybody in CPH speaks English so it's not a problem!

You have a good time in Sweden, it's a nice northern country and I'm sure you will enjoy it! Swedish is also much easier language to learn than this bloody Danish  bigthumbsup 



I like driving backwards in the fog cause it doesn't remind me of anything - Chris Cornell
User currently offlineAgill From Sweden, joined Feb 2004, 1007 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1432 times:

Muddydwagon: Well I wouldn't worry too much about the language. Most Americans I have met have had a fairly easy transition to Swedish. And basically everyone speaks English here anyway. Where are you going by the way?

User currently offlineHimmelstormer From Denmark, joined Mar 2005, 143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1419 times:

I lived in London for 4½ years and before that I spend some time in Israel too.

When you move abroad I think it is important to learn the language as quickly as possible because you will then feel that you're part of the society. Learning a new culture and language will also open your heart and mind to new ideas, and even if you are frustrated at times, you'll become a stronger person. I also think it is important to accept that you sometimes will feel very homesick, but as long as you deal with it head on, with support from your wife, you will be greatly rewarded and learn to handle the new surroundings.

As for Sweden, great country with very nice people, I'm sure you will have a wonderful time.

Good luck!


User currently offlineSenorcarnival From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1408 times:

I moved from Sao Paulo, Brazil to Columbia, SC when I was 11. You can imagine how big of a culture shock that was...we barely spoke English, even though I was taught English in school in Brazil, when you're thrown in front of 20 southern kids with heavy accents (in hindsight, their accents probably weren't so bad...) whatever you learned goes right out the window. Thanks to cartoons and comics, I REALLY learned English.
I went back to Brazil not long after, and moved to Austin (my dad had found a job as a professor at UT - Austin) when I was 16. By then, I was already somewhat aware of what I was getting myself into going to an American school that it was a lot easier to adapt.
You have a native going with you, so that should ease the transition, no? Either way, best of luck!


User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 16, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1403 times:

ive lived in several different cities and countries around the world, i think the best thing it can do for you is to realize how people are people around the world, and that the xenophobes are really exagerating, you will also see that cultural boundaries arent as stern as people make it out to be, politics is mostly in the news and media, you will see how great it is to have international friends and culture enriching your own!

im sure the first thing you'll learn are the swear words lol



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineSK A340 From Sweden, joined Mar 2000, 845 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1388 times:

Quoting Muddydwagon (Thread starter):
How bad was the culture shock?

I've only been to the US twice so I can't say I have that much experience in this area but many people claim Sweden to be on of the most "Americanized" countries. Of course that is not politically, which you probably will recognize. The taxes are HIGH but many stuff, like some of the best medical care in the world, some of the most respected universities in Europe and other stuff are "free".

The Americanization is in other parts of the society. You can't be in any bigger city or drive on any of the bigger roads for too long without seeing a McDonald's, Burger King or a "trendy coffee shop". We, as you like big cars and Stockholm is crowded by SUVs and large (Volvo) estates.

The TV programs here are like the ones in the states; Sitcoms and reality shows 24-7 (that's what it feels like anyway).

If you have any other questions, just let me know and I'll try to answer them.

Välkommen till Sverige!

/Micke


User currently offlineBA380 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 1466 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1374 times:

I moved from London to Duesseldorf for a few years (back now). Absolutely loved it there. Great city, great people, so much more pleasant than London. You'll settle in really quickly I am sure.


cabin crew: doors to automatic and cross-check...
User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1373 times:

It can be a little intimidating at first, but you get used to it. I've moved countries a few times (VOLUNTARILY, I might add, before Kirkie chimes in with his "deportation" gag) !

UK - South Africa (1980) - Netherlands (1993) - UK (1993) - Netherlands (1994) - Australia (1995) - UK (1997) - France (2001).

Step 1. Prepare thoroughly ! Read all you can about where you're going - ask people who've been and who know the place. Find out where is good to live (areas, types of housing, how close to work, shops, etc etc).

Step 2. Find somewhere to live - the internet is marvellous ! Don't rent anywhere without actually seeing it first hand, but you can get a great idea of where to look and how much to pay before you even leave.

Step 3. Prepare the admin in advance. Find out how to get Work permits, residence permits, drivers license, how to register for tax, how to get phone, electricity, gas, cable tv, ADSL etc switched on asap. Find out about what documents you'll need (Birth Certificate, Education certificates, health certificates, and whether you need translated versions (can be tricky / expensive, as it often requires a certified translator). If you're moving with your company, ask them to help you. AND WRITE IT ALL DOWN.

Step 4. Find a good bank. Check which of your credit cards you can transfer to a locally-based account (Amex do this sometimes - not for France though  grumpy  ). Find out what you need in order to open a local bank and/or credit account eg. residence permit, utility bill (as proof of address), etc.

Step 5. Check whether your car insurance no-claims bonus or whatever can be transferred to local car insurance (this can reduce the cost a LOT !) - it usually is, if you can provide documentary proof that you had an accident-free past - a letter from your current insurance provider should do it.

That's all I can think of at the moment - best of luck !


User currently offlineA389 From United Arab Emirates, joined Jan 2005, 59 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1351 times:

I've moved from Portugal to Spain and even if we are so close and not that different culturally I was a bit intimidated at the beginning.

I didn't full control the language and housing was a something difficult. I did some homework and had a place to stay while looking for something else....but to find a nice place to stay was quite hard. After that settled I must say I've had a really great time.

As you are moving with a someone local I think you wont have this problems.

Good luck!

Quoting Toulouse (Reply 11):
I once tried to by a piece of furniture telling the saleswoman that I wanted a chest with three "balls/testicles" (cojones, instead of cAjones)

 rotfl   rotfl   rotfl 


User currently offlineIFLYMCO From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 482 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 1318 times:

I am currently living in a foreign country (to me anyway) I am from the US hence my SN, but I am living in the Netherlands (hence the flag). Been here since January and I LOVE IT. One thing that helped me was the English proficiency that the Dutch have. You will probably encounter the same thing in Sweden. I am not one of those who sticks only to English and I try Dutch whenever possible (greatly appreciated by the locals.) So, my advice would be to learn a little Swedish and use it whenever possible. Basicallu just relax and have fun with your new surroundings- the situations you might be apprehensive about never turn out to be as bad as imagined (extreme language barrier), a smile goes a long way!

I wish you the best of luck in your move and remember, DRESS WARMLY!



Now it should be "IFLYDCA"
User currently offlineSK A340 From Sweden, joined Mar 2000, 845 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1300 times:

Quoting IFLYMCO (Reply 21):
and remember, DRESS WARMLY!

Depends on where you're gonna stay. The last eight, ten winters in Stockholm (and the parts of the country south of the capital) has been fairly warm (not many days below 0 celsius) and the summers pretty warm, around 20 to 25 celsius. Of course my definition of warm weather is the one of a Viking  fight 

/Micke


User currently offlineMuddydwagon From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 657 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1273 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 7):
While you're in Sweden, remember to visit Airliners.net headquarters in Luleå

Yes I will be sure to check that out  Silly

When I was in Sweden last in February my wife and I rented an apartment. We now have a car, and we both have jobs. So I do belive that the most worrisome things have already been taken care of.

I do have my interview with the Swedish migrationsverket on June the 8th so after that it will all be down hill just have to book the ticket and go


Cheers, Pete


User currently offlineCaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 1256 times:

Well said 2H4. Even though your words were ment for Muddydwagon, I plan to take to heart. In three weeks, I am moving to Mexico City for school. This is very major, as I would be in a totally new environment, something I have never done before. Thankfully, I met some good guys on this site, who live in Mexico City so I am looking forward to experiencing this adventure.

Good luck on your move Muddydwagon, wish you and your wife all the best.



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineMuddydwagon From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 657 posts, RR: 4
Reply 25, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1210 times:

Quoting Agill (Reply 13):
Where are you going by the way?

I will be living in Vetlanda Kommun. Thank you all for the helpful information and insight on moving to another country.

Cheers Pete


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