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Lance, Why Not Eight?  
User currently offlineBlackbird1331 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1892 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1192 times:

Lance, at only 33 years old, why do you quit now? Anyone have an answer?


Cameras shoot pictures. Guns shoot people. They have the guns.
24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1191 times:

Quoting Blackbird1331 (Thread starter):
why do you quit now? Anyone have an answer?

It is not over until he doesn't show up for the Tour De Lance next year. When the pellotone moves w/out him, then I'll believe it!!


User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1180 times:

Two words.... Michael Jordan.

He retired once... or was it twice... or was it three times. I lost count a long time ago.


User currently offlineWaterpolodan From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1649 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1178 times:

Exactly. Jordan was probably the greatest basketball player ever, but when he came back with the wizards for a final season or two after his first retirement, he was nothing more than an older player with a pretty good jump shot... you don't want to go out with a fizzle when you can go out with a bang, and if Lance wins again this year I can't see that record being challenged again for a long time so what more does he have to prove? He's making a good decision, now I just hope he wins the time trial tomorrow so he can finally have an individual stage win this year.

User currently offlineMKEdude From South Korea, joined May 2005, 1010 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1160 times:

As Neil Young said..."better to burn out then to fade away"

As a cyclist he is never going to top what he has done, the only way he will make news again is if somebody beats him, which will eventually happen. This way he goes out on top and everybody remembers him as a champion, not some has-been who hung on too long.



"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline." Frank Zappa
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1155 times:

gonna agree here that there's some'n to be said for quitting while you're ahead.

User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11445 posts, RR: 76
Reply 6, posted (8 years 9 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1128 times:
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I'm going to say that eventually, if you see the view from all the faces of Mt. Everests summit, you'll need some new challenges.

I think he at least needs a break and a fresh perspective.

He is the greatest cyclist in the history of the sport and I won't be surprised to see him excel at whatever he decides to do next.



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3312 posts, RR: 35
Reply 7, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1086 times:

Quoting DL021 (Reply 6):
He is the greatest cyclist in the history of the sport

This is valid if you do not know the history of the sport...or if you bulldoze everything before Armstrong won 2 or 3 TdF and the USA suddenly went hyperbolic on the PR tracks of Motorola and US Postal.


User currently offline9V-SPF From Germany, joined Sep 2001, 1375 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1084 times:

Quoting DL021 (Reply 6):
He is the greatest cyclist in the history of the sport

As much as I greatly respect his extraordinary achievements, I think that this title rather belongs to Eddy Merckx.

I think it is a reasonable decision to quit now as he will leave the stage of cycling unbeaten which is a privilege that other great cyclists like Indurain, Hinault or Merckx weren´t able to achieve.
He will be remembered not only as the first rider with seven wins, he will also keep the myth of being unbeatable, especially as this year´s win was one of the most superior ones since 1999.

By the way (sorry for getting off-topic), what the hell was going on with Rasmussen (and his bikes) today?  crazy 

Congratulations to Lance and his team for an awesome demonstration of strength!  thumbsup 


User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3312 posts, RR: 35
Reply 9, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1069 times:

Rasmussen was on his knees since several days.
He passed brilliantly the Alps and that was as much as his engine could give.
What happened today is the result of total exhaustion.


User currently offlineVenezuela747 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1419 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1049 times:

Quoting 9V-SPF (Reply 8):
By the way (sorry for getting off-topic), what the hell was going on with Rasmussen (and his bikes) today?

He started to choke when he realized how good Ulrich is at time trials and saw the possibility of loosing his podium position .....Ulrich was in his head and not the race



ROLL TIDE!!!
User currently offline9V-SPF From Germany, joined Sep 2001, 1375 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1046 times:

Quoting Venezuela747 (Reply 10):
He started to choke when he realized how good Ulrich is at time trials and saw the possibility of loosing his podium position .....Ulrich was in his head and not the race

He knew he was way inferior to Ullrich in time trials before today´s stage so he should have taken it easy. I think that Iakobos´ explanation is more likely to be true: Especially the second crash was inexplicable because he already knew that all chances for a place on the podium were long gone. The permanent troubles with his bike did not help him either...


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1037 times:

Two words.... Michael Jordan

Wrong..!! Two words... His Kids...!! When he announced his retirement last year the reason given was to spend more time with his three children. He said he was spending too much time away from them during these early formative years and did not want to be an absentee father.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineMKEdude From South Korea, joined May 2005, 1010 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1031 times:

Quoting Iakobos (Reply 7):
This is valid if you do not know the history of the sport...or if you bulldoze everything before Armstrong won 2 or 3 TdF

6 TdFs, now almost 7. Not 2 or 3.



"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline." Frank Zappa
User currently offlineZRH From Switzerland, joined Nov 1999, 5564 posts, RR: 37
Reply 14, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1017 times:

Quoting DL021 (Reply 6):
He is the greatest cyclist in the history of the sport

Sure one of the greatest, but I also count Merckx and Indurain to the greatest.

You have to step back when your on the top. Imagine, Armstrong shows up again next year an probably loses. What a sad end for a great cyclist.


User currently offlineBR076 From Netherlands, joined May 2005, 1080 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1011 times:

Quoting MKEdude (Reply 13):
6 TdFs, now almost 7. Not 2 or 3.

Lance Armstrong is a great cyclist for sure, 7 TdFs is a great achievement , but he's not the greatest cyclist of all time, why? Because the TdF is the only thing he does and that is what he is working for all year, while someone like Eddy Mercx or Bernard Hinault were on the bike the whole year, they participated and did win cycle classics in Spring, they participated and did win etappes in the Vuelta and the Giro d'Italia and both won the Tour de France 5 times, so in my book they are the greatest cyclists of all time.



ú
User currently offlineBlackbird1331 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1892 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1004 times:

That was their choice. Lance did not make the Tour the premier cycling event, he only participated. And, he won.


Cameras shoot pictures. Guns shoot people. They have the guns.
User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3312 posts, RR: 35
Reply 17, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 973 times:

Actual rankings (though there is nothing official) showed Lance Armstrong in 19th position in the "all time" list at the beginning of this season, and he will probably make it just into the top 15 tomorrow.

Even Lance (publicly) does not compare himself to the greatests.

MKEdude, for your compehension...
Pro cycling is something new in the States and it ignited after 2 or 3 Lance victories in the TdF and the PR efforts of Motorola and US Postal.

For this same reason (arising US and consequently other nations interests) pro-cycling has become a much "richer" sport, bigger prize money, more sponsors, bigger budgets, TV audiences multiplied by 20-30, media coverage by 100, etc....it has become a nearly global event, and Lance is no stranger to this success.

A sporstman like Lance can live very well with a single target in the season, this was absolutely not the case before.
The "stars" were well paid but they had to perform all-year round and after 3-4 years they could think about buying a nice house (no castle).
The "helpers" had to complete a real career (10 and more years) before thinking about some comfort.
The less fortunate were happy if able to open a cycle shop or been on a team's payroll to clean the bikes, change the wheels or drive the car.

It is the combination of Lance repetitive successes with US sponsors that has changed this sport, and it was the only combination that could have made it.


User currently offlineTbar220 From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7011 posts, RR: 26
Reply 18, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 954 times:

Is he retiring from biking or just the TdF? Also, what other stuff does he compete in? I find it hard to believe the TdF is the only event he competes in.


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User currently offlineMKEdude From South Korea, joined May 2005, 1010 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (8 years 9 months 3 days ago) and read 936 times:

Quoting Iakobos (Reply 17):
MKEdude, for your compehension...
Pro cycling is something new in the States and it ignited after 2 or 3 Lance victories in the TdF and the PR efforts of Motorola and US Postal.

I was simply pointing out that 6-7 victories is numerically different from 2-3 I wanted to make sure you were aware "For your comprehension"



"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline." Frank Zappa
User currently offline9V-SPF From Germany, joined Sep 2001, 1375 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (8 years 9 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 920 times:

Quoting Tbar220 (Reply 18):
I find it hard to believe the TdF is the only event he competes in.

Your doubts are well justified. The Tour de France is of course not the only event Lance participated in as he, like all other professional cyclists, need race experience before competing in a major event like the TdF.
However, the Tour was the only race he competed in with the clear aim to win it while all other events were just used for preparation. The same could be said for several other riders like Ullrich (although he adds the World Championship and the Vuelta from time to time) or Basso (who competed in the Giro this year though). But Lance was the only one who aimed at the TdF with that much conviction and with all other aspects of life becoming secondary until he reached Paris. This attitude made him win the Tour seven times.


User currently offlineIbhayi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (8 years 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 912 times:

When the Postal contract was coming to and end he went out to find new sponsors and part of the agreement with Discovery Channel was him riding another TDF. He was originally planning to ride the tour in 2006 and not 2005 instead focussing on a few classis, specifically Amstel Gold and the Giro d' Italia.

With the investigation and court case of 100 000 Euro's against Lance in Italy and the Italian prosecutors licking their lips with the idea of him being there is part of the reason he decided to can it.

He loves his kids very much and his cycling career took them away from him for a large part of the year, that I belive and he has said was hte main reason for him retiring. They are with him now at the last week of the TDF, and he handed them his stuff he got for winning the stage and the yellow jearsey for yesterday.

He would spend many months in Europe away from hids kids, since they live with their mom and he is divorced from Kristin.


User currently offlineVenezuela747 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1419 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (8 years 9 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 905 times:

Quoting Tbar220 (Reply 18):
Is he retiring from biking or just the TdF? Also, what other stuff does he compete in? I find it hard to believe the TdF is the only event he competes in.

He is retiring from all racing......I am not sure exact races but he does compete in other races Giro, Vuelta, the one before the TDF (Dolphe LIbere or something like that)....they are all short races anywhere from 1 day to 1 week so he uses them as preparation for the TdF rather than to win.



ROLL TIDE!!!
User currently offlineIbhayi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (8 years 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 898 times:

He did not compete in the Giro. he never has, and has ridden the Vuelta once in 1998 where he came 4th.

User currently offline9V-SPF From Germany, joined Sep 2001, 1375 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (8 years 9 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 883 times:

Quoting Venezuela747 (Reply 22):
Giro, Vuelta, the one before the TDF (Dolphe LIbere or something like that)....they are all short races anywhere from 1 day to 1 week so he uses them as preparation for the TdF rather than to win.

As Ibhayi said, Lance has never competed in the Giro and only once in the Vuelta. Furthermore, the Giro and the Vuelta are both three weeks long (like the TdF), not "short races from 1 day to 1 week". And by the way, it´s spelled "Dauphiné Liberé". This has been the last race Lance competed in before the TdF most of the times (I think he chose the Tour de Suisse only once).  Smile

It is now official that Lance Armstrong has won his seventh TdF as the organization has neutralized the complete race when the cyclists entered the Champs-Elysées due to bad weather. The riders now only fight for the stage win and points for the green jersey.


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