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Any Sailing Fans Around Here?  
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8961 posts, RR: 40
Posted (9 years 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 1641 times:

Any A.netters enjoy sailing, just for fun/hobby or as a sport?

I LOVE sailing. I used to compete every weekend when I was in Brazil, but since I'm studying in ATL right now, I don't have a decent place to go out (nor the time, really)... Savannah is nice, but too far away for a weekend trip.

What do you guys sail? I learned on the Optimist (3 years) and moved on to the Laser for a short period of time until I came to ATL. I also was a skipper for a few 23 footers and also did a few races with a friend of mine on his Snipe.

I also keep track of the America's Cup and Volvo Ocean Race.

Any interesting stories would be nice if you guys shared?

Cheers,
PPVRA


"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMrniji From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 1631 times:

I finished my licence for a 20 m boat two years ago, but unfortunately did not e=really have to time to sail often (I would need some instructions again, otherwise a desaster could approach Big grin ), though I would love to! It is an amazing sport.

User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16248 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1629 times:

Yes. Major sailor here. Albacores and lasers. Sail about 4x a week from early June to late Sept.


Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineJafa39 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 1621 times:

Yup, grew up on Mirrors, Enterprises and later on. Lasers. Had a Starling last summer and looking for a new dinghy as we speak.

I also used to work as fleet engineer for a yacht charter outfit in Corfu (Greece) so spent a lot of time on 30 foot + yachts...and got paid for it!!!


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8961 posts, RR: 40
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1594 times:

Quoting Mrniji (Reply 1):

Oh man, gotta keep it up! Once you get some experience, it's like riding a bike, you never forget! Although, I have to say, you do get rusty after a while.

Quoting Yyz717 (Reply 2):
Yes. Major sailor here. Albacores and lasers. Sail about 4x a week from early June to late Sept.

Toronto is a great place to sail, Lake Ontario is huge and right next to downtown. Hows wind conditions there btw? I was there for about 4 days this summer but didnt see a whole lot of wind at all, at least not on the bay area.

Must be a long wait over the winter months though!

A friend of mine went to an Optimist tournament about 3 years ago (some place near Toronto), it was either the World tournament or the North American tournament.

Quoting Jafa39 (Reply 3):

I also used to work as fleet engineer for a yacht charter outfit in Corfu (Greece) so spent a lot of time on 30 foot + yachts...and got paid for it!!!

My dream summer job!! I've looked a bit into it (mostly into companies that sail boats to destinations for other people), just for some general info, but haven't had the chance to do it yet.

I'm thinking of maybe going to NZ or Australia next year for Uni, after I'm done here in ATL, but for now it's just a lot of hot air lol... but it would be awesome, that region is definately the sailing capital of the world.

Nice to hear a few a.netters enjoy sailing as well!

Cheers,
PPVRA



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineMrniji From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1586 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 4):
Oh man, gotta keep it up! Once you get some experience, it's like riding a bike, you never forget! Although, I have to say, you do get rusty after a while.

OK, I know whom to call when I am in Brazil  Smile


User currently offlineBNE From Australia, joined Mar 2000, 3183 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

I guess I am a sailing fan, the picture I posted in Post your picture VII had me in front of a sailing boat. http://www.125assoc.com; the Australian 125 class dinghy is the one I currently sail. I have sailed in the 125 national championships for the last 3 years. I have been sailing since I was 10.
In 2000 I went to Auckland; New Zealand to watch a few races of the Americas Cup.



Why fly non stop when you can connect
User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16248 posts, RR: 56
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1568 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 4):
Toronto is a great place to sail, Lake Ontario is huge and right next to downtown. Hows wind conditions there btw? I was there for about 4 days this summer but didnt see a whole lot of wind at all, at least not on the bay area.

Must be a long wait over the winter months though!

A friend of mine went to an Optimist tournament about 3 years ago (some place near Toronto), it was either the World tournament or the North American tournament.

Wind conditions are lighter than on any sea coast. Average winds are 6-7 knots, although often there is no wind. Hence, "drifters" or light wind racing is common, and the need to develop light wind racing techniques (light wind sail trim, searching for wind, clear air) are important. Alternately, we do get the 15+ knot blowouts which are always fun. Winds tend to be stronger in the shoulder months (May, Sept). The water is cold (average 5c in May) which requires wetsuits, but warms up to about 20c by end of June. We sail until about mid-Oct at the latest. We do experience light currents at times but no tide since we are on a lake. Fresh water racing is nice since we get thrown in a lot. The mix of brain (sail trim konwledge and tactics) and brawn (keeping the boat flat in strong winds) are what appeal to me.

Yes, the winter wait can be long!

There is a huge optimist fleet in the Toronto area.



Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineHalls120 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1563 times:

As soon as my son graduates from college - hopefully this December, I'm taking the money I've been spending on him and buying a 32-footer for the Chesapeake Bay. I can't wait for next March....

User currently offlineCornish From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2005, 8187 posts, RR: 54
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1561 times:

Well growing up near Falmouth in England, I was always going to end up sailing. My Dad has always been a competitive sailor - doing some of the big races like the Fastnet when I was young. He competed on the infamous one of 1979 (I think) where many sailors drowned. After that he stopped for some years and my brother and I learned to sail Lasers around our bay.

Now I'm in London, I don't get to sail very much any more  Sad but try to whenever I get home

But now that Dad has long got rid of my brother and I, he has invested and become a part owner in a beautiful 120 year old (ish!) Falmouth Working boat, that he races with friends almost every weekend. They are incredibly beautiful old wooden boats and to see a fleet of them racing is a beautiful sight to behold.



Just when I thought I could see light at the end of the tunnel, it was some B*****d with a torch bringing me more work
User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3313 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1555 times:

Started in the early 70's on a 50ft owner-built steel pencil made on plans of an Admiral's Cup winner of the 30's... that was in the Eastern Schelde (Netherlands), also known as Veersemeer.

Did some on a nice French 46 footer along the coast France-Spain, on my uncle's 30ft, and scary passage on a converted fishing boat by gale 8 and 13ft swell.

Got my certificate in Greece in '98 from the hands of an Olympic champion (in 470 or FD, not sure).
Except for a wonderful island-hopping Aegean crossing from Rhodes to the mainland, I did not have many chances to sail, a pitty in such a place.

Sailboat rentals is a big business in Greece, loads of French and Germans spent supposedly sailing holidays here, mainly motoring from one port to the next.


User currently offlineQuestAir From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 367 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1539 times:

I like sailing a lot. I live near Boston, so I sail a lot during the summer on the Charles River. I also sail Sunfishes and Vanguard V-15s in New Hampshire too. The program in Boston on the Charles River is called Community Boating, and kids under 18 can sail all summer for just $1. I took advantage of that offer!


'Do we carry rich people on our flights? Yes, I flew on one this morning and I�m very rich.' - Michael O'Leary
User currently offlineFbgdavidson From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 3706 posts, RR: 28
Reply 12, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1539 times:

Have to admit I'm a fair weather and very occassional sailor.

My father attained a Day Skipper (and Coastal qualifications I think) and we were keen to make use of it. We had one week on the Caledonian Canal in Scotland back in 1997 to get used to being on a sailing boat and doing the basics. The following year we hired a 52' Beneteau in the British Virgin Islands for 2 weeks which was incredible. The boat was fantastic, the place was out of this world and the sailing was fun...apart from a few schoolboy errors (reversing back over the rope towing the dinghy and wrapping it around the prop was an interesting occurrence  Big grin ). We went back the following two summers but let it slip slightly in the meantime. I don't sail much in the UK as the Solent, the prime sailing waters are full of asshats in powerboats....and container ships and it is extremely busy.

My girlfriends parents have a couple of yachts and sail regularly in Chesapeake Bay something I have enjoyed many times on my visits over there. However my skills don't extend much beyond opening beer and wine and the occasional bit of steering when in open water and a fair distance from other craft!

What I find funny is some good friends of ours had been sailing for a number of years before my father and us got into it. They looked down at us for our fair weather sailing preferences and chose to sail in freezing waters of Scotland, Denmark and Sweden wearing oilskins in the summer and returning with tales of 30ft waves, gale force winds etc etc. This weekend they are in Scotland  Big grin Gale force winds due tomorrow!!



"My first job was selling doors, door to door, that's a tough job innit" - Bill Bailey
User currently offlineBNE From Australia, joined Mar 2000, 3183 posts, RR: 12
Reply 13, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1525 times:

I would have expected there to be more sailing fans around, I guess if you can afford to travel then you are more likely to be able to afford a sailing boat or know of people who have a sailing boat.


Why fly non stop when you can connect
User currently offlineFlyAUA From Austria, joined May 2005, 4604 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1520 times:

Yeah I am a fan. I like sailors Big grin


Not drinking, also isn't a solution!
User currently offlinePerthGloryFan From Australia, joined Oct 2000, 751 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1511 times:

I was a keen (and moderately) successful dinghy sailor in my high school, and just after days, way back in the mid 1960s to early 1970s.

The west coast of Australia is blessed with consistent 10-20kt SSW winds for probably 360 days of the year with fantastic long following swells, just perfect for oversailed planing dinghies back then, and the world's best wind surfing conditions today.

Picture this: A 12ft dinghy (*), 200 sq ft of sail (main, jib & flat reaching spinnaker); on tight starboard reach; skipper with his backside hanging over the side; me hanging from the "trapeze" wire with only my toes on the gunwhale, stretching my back out over the water trying to keep us flat; sweetly skimming across the blue-green ocean in Champion Bay at Geraldton (find it in an Atlas) at almost the speed of the wind (probably around 15kts).

Then suddenly the surface of the water is no longer just 1 foot beneath my back it's more like 20!(**). Unbeknown to us we had been sailing up the back of a swell and the boat was over shooting the crest - nothing beneath me but a drop down the face of the swell - then with only about 3 foot of the hull still in contact with the water surface the bow would dip and down the face of that swell we'd fly. The skipper would now lean back over the transom and I would "walk" along the gunwhalel while hanging from the wire to join him, urging the bow to lift so it wouldn't bury us into the back of the next swell. Two times out of three we would succeed, the dinghy would slow and shudder a bit as the bowsprit and stem would plow into the next swell then we'd recover and be off again - I'd edge forward working the spinnaker sheet and picking up speed we'd climb that swell. The third time though we'd turn into a submarine with the dinghy spearing into the swell, water streaming over the foredeck into the cockpit (self draining fortunately) and I'd be washed off the boat, we'd capsize and everything would be a tangle of ropes and sails. So we'd drop and recover the spinnaker, climb onto the centreboard, upright the dinghy, clamber back aboard and set off again.

Regardless of the outcome the experience was always the greatest adrenalin rush you ever wish for.

(*) The dinghy was a "Gwen 12", a 1950's Cunningham design, the same guy who had success in the "Little America's Cup" Competition with solid wing-mast Open Catamarans.
(**) The Gwen 12's mast was 16ft in length and my mother, who was the sailing club timekeeper at the time, would say that from her post in the clubhouse on the finish line the complete mast would disappear from view beneath the swells which therefore would have to be 18-20ft high.

Apologies for the nostalgic ramble but ah, those long lost summers of youth!

PGF


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8961 posts, RR: 40
Reply 16, posted (9 years 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1508 times:

Quoting Yyz717 (Reply 7):

Somewhat similar situation with me. I sail in a lake (a big water reservoir really) which is inside the city of Sao Paulo. Winds are often weak, averaging less then 10 knots, but do often go above 10 and every so often reaching the 20s (above that is rare, but it happens). Polution is a big problem though.

However, this is my favourite place to sail (of the places i've been to):

http://www.svilhabela.com.br/

Good winds, never below 10C (note: pics in the website are during winter!) all year around, just insane place...



Website is in Portuguese, but there are a few good photos. This small island, accessible by 30 minute or so ferry ride only, gets packed during the sailing week, hundreds of boats take part, inluding a "fun race" around some island just offshore (about a 12 hour race). But they also have regular regattas for dinghies.

Still have to find time and go to Rio for some sailing, everyone who's been there loves the place.

Quoting Iakobos (Reply 10):
Got my certificate in Greece in '98 from the hands of an Olympic champion (in 470 or FD, not sure).

Awesome, Imet Robert Scheidt (2X Olimpic (including Athens 04) and 7X World Champion Laser Class) in numerous ocasions, I've seen him sailing too, the guy is unbelievable. Don't know him personally though, but he seems a very nice guy.

Quoting QuestAir (Reply 11):
The program in Boston on the Charles River is called Community Boating, and kids under 18 can sail all summer for just $1. I took advantage of that offer!

That's an amazing deal! We all know that it isn't a cheap sport/hobby by any means!

Quoting Fbgdavidson (Reply 12):
the prime sailing waters are full of asshats in powerboats

Know it all too well.... world wide problem. Not to mention the occasional drunk one that causes a tragedy.

Quoting FlyAUA (Reply 14):
Yeah I am a fan. I like sailors

And reality strikes and drags you back down to earth... or err... A.Net.

Quoting PerthGloryFan (Reply 15):

Followed by an amazing night of sleep! These days tear you apart, but we love them!

Man, that description left me aching for some sailing!!

Quoting PerthGloryFan (Reply 15):


Apologies for the nostalgic ramble but ah, those long lost summers of youth!

Best way to put it!

Cheers

[Edited 2005-08-24 18:09:35]


"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
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