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Origins Of Britspeak  
User currently offlineSwisskloten From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1057 times:

British a.netters (Kirkie too!), wonder if you know about the origins of cliches and sayings that are prevalent in the UK. How did they come about?
What does bloody refer to? (Move that bloody plane or I'll shoot it up!)
Wanker? (I think you know how it's used!)
Blimey
Tosser
Rubbish
Bloody hell (sounds overdone, if yer in hell, it's gonna be bloody awful!  biggrin  Wink)
Bugger: I've heard Australians say "I've got bugger-all to do." I've never heard a Briton say that. They always use the word alone. Is this what Oz lovingly refers to as Strine?

One last thing, I've heard a lot of Germans on a.net using British words every so often. Is this prevalent in Germany? I was surprised how many German posts or replies have the words bloody or something else. There are too many examples to list here.

26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGoAround From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 616 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1027 times:

The British say bugger all, fuck all, sod all to do, too! Interesting question. Bloody is used to diminish something, eg 'the bloody window smashed'. Or, you could use sodding/fucking, or quite commonly nowadays people insert their own word eg 'horsing' or 'twatting'.

Rubbish is the same as trash, refers to waste. If something's rubbish, it's no good. eg 'It's rubbish', no other real use for it.

Tosser = the same as wanker, to toss off/masturbate. Fucker is similar :P And so is sod.

Not sure about the others really - especially not the origin!



GoAround
User currently offlineCatatonic From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 1155 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1019 times:

BOLLOCKS!!!!!!!!!
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Equally Cursed and Blessed.
User currently offlineOly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6685 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1014 times:

(Cor) Blimey is shorthand for "God blind me", AFAIK.

Quite a few terms like this derived from expressions with religious content but disguised/distorted so as not to offend the more religious. Some go back centuries. Basically it was a way of bringing God into swearing, and adding impact, without actually saying the word straight out.



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1015 times:

I've heard several possible derivations of "bloody", including it being a corruption of "by your lady". It's a pretty mild term.

"Blimey" is a shortening of "God blind me" in the same way that the Australian "Strewth" is an abbreviation of "God's truth".

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
One last thing, I've heard a lot of Germans on a.net using British words every so often. Is this prevalent in Germany? I was surprised how many German posts or replies have the words bloody or something else. There are too many examples to list here.

They use American terms too. You just don't notice because you see them all the time and don't notice it. Non-native (but fluent) speakers are likely to use all sorts of different countries' dialect words.

One of the amazing things is how many terms which are thought of as modern are really not. For example, calling someone a "waster" is often viewed as a modern term, but it isn't. In the Royal Navy (and presumably the US Navy too) of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the able hands would be fore and aft, and the landsmen in the waist - or middle of the deck. They were known as "waisters" and were viewed as incompetent. The term continues, just with a spelling change due to a misunderstanding of the origin. There are loads of examples of things like that.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineWhiteHatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1008 times:

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
One last thing, I've heard a lot of Germans on a.net using British words every so often. Is this prevalent in Germany?

Not that I know of.
I've noticed a lot of Americans using arse instead of ass as well lately. The British also use 'twat' quite a lot, but in different contexts. For instance:

"Kirky is a twat"

"I twatted Kirky over the head with a brick"

Australians tend to use much the same sort of words us British lot do as well. Bugger is extremely common in British usage. Although if you want an object lesson in the foul mouthed colloquialisms of the British you need do no more than read anything Kirky has posted in the last 12 months.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1006 times:

The other thing to remember is that a great many of these terms are so ancient that they will have crossed the Atlantic with the English settlers. It's just that some died out of useage and others didn't. Language developed on both sides and some words were cast off and others weren't.

Examples? "Garbage" is good old English word, but virtually became extinct here and continued in the US. "Gotten" likewise.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineAndreas From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 6104 posts, RR: 31
Reply 7, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 989 times:

Quoting WhiteHatter (Reply 5):
For instance:

"Kirky is a twat"

"I twatted Kirky over the head with a brick"

Now Whitehatter, that is VERY interesting...would you be so kind as to extend your list by, say, 100 or so examples?  Wink



I know it's only VfB but I like it!
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 986 times:

Quoting Andreas (Reply 7):
Now Whitehatter, that is VERY interesting...would you be so kind as to extend your list by, say, 100 or so examples?

And in the case of the latter example given, preferably with photographic evidence. Big grin



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8685 posts, RR: 43
Reply 9, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 986 times:

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
One last thing, I've heard a lot of Germans on a.net using British words every so often. Is this prevalent in Germany?

We're taught bloody British English in school. The colourful expressions however, even those of British origin, are all-American a.k.a. "home skooled".  Wink



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineQANTASFOREVER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 981 times:

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
Is this what Oz lovingly refers to as Strine?

Australians never lovingly call it "Strine". It's sloppy English - nothing more.

QFF


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 11, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 974 times:

Quoting QANTASFOREVER (Reply 10):
Australians never lovingly call it "Strine". It's sloppy English - nothing more.

And there was me thinking Kath & Kim were part of an Open University course...  Wink



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineWhiteHatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 963 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 11):
And there was me thinking Kath & Kim were part of an Open University course...

I thought it was a travel documentary...


User currently offlineJush From Germany, joined Apr 2005, 1636 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 957 times:

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
One last thing, I've heard a lot of Germans on a.net using British words every so often. Is this prevalent in Germany? I was surprised how many German posts or replies have the words bloody or something else. There are too many examples to list here.

For me it is good old school in Somerset. Even if you're a german. After you lived there half a year you can't deny the influence you had there.
Learned all the words which we weren't taught in school Big grin


Regards
jush



There is one problem with airbus. Though their products are engineering marvels they lack passion, completely.
User currently offlineGeoffm From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 2111 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 929 times:

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
Bugger: I've heard Australians say "I've got bugger-all to do." I've never heard a Briton say that. They always use the word alone.

Far from it - we use bugger all a lot. Bugger, I've burnt the toast. Bugger, I've got bugger all bread left to make any more toast.

Quoting Swisskloten (Thread starter):
Wanker?

Jerk.

Geoff M.


User currently offlineHighpeaklad From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 904 times:

I love it when you hear little old ladies saying " ooh and it hurt like buggery! " I often wonder if our American cousins know what she's saying?

Chris



Don't try to keep up with the Joneses - bring them down to your level !
User currently offlineBristolFlyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2290 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 889 times:

Quoting Geoffm (Reply 14):
Far from it - we use bugger all a lot

And I seem to remember it's used in Four Weddings & a Funeral quite a bit. It's actually quite a posh term mainly used by the upper classes.

Oh, and just for the record, the meaning of 'posh' derives from an acronym Port Out, Starboard Home, a reference to the more upper class side of the QE2 liner on trips across the Atlantic. Having a cabin on the port side going west and on the starboard side going east was more expensive as you got the sun on your balcony going in both directions.

How about that for a snippet of useless information?!

BF



Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 877 times:

Quoting BristolFlyer (Reply 16):
How about that for a snippet of useless information?!

Pretty much worth sweet FA.  Wink


User currently offlineBristolFlyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2290 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 872 times:

Quoting Logan22L (Reply 17):
Pretty much worth sweet FA.

Well if you could send me a sweet F/A that would be great!

BF



Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 19, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 871 times:

Quoting BristolFlyer (Reply 16):
Port Out, Starboard Home, a reference to the more upper class side of the QE2 liner on trips across the Atlantic

It's from way before the QE2 was around but otherwise correct.

How about that for a snippet of pedantic information?!


User currently offlineBristolFlyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2290 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 870 times:

Quoting David L (Reply 19):
How about that for a snippet of pedantic information?!

I bow down to your superior level of pedantry!  sorry 

BF



Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineAerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7155 posts, RR: 13
Reply 21, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 867 times:

Quoting Highpeaklad (Reply 15):
" ooh and it hurt like buggery! "

hahahaha The thought of little old ladies being taken up the ass isn't probably the
first thing that would spring to mind for them...


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 22, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 860 times:

Quoting BristolFlyer (Reply 20):
I bow down to your superior level of pedantry!

It's what I do best.  Smile


User currently offlineRunway23 From US Minor Outlying Islands, joined Jan 2005, 2181 posts, RR: 36
Reply 23, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 852 times:

Britain has recently been accustomed to saying "rhaa". To the point that Oxford dictionary is soon to include the word.

User currently offlineSwisskloten From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (8 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 852 times:

Quoting Geoffm (Reply 14):
Far from it - we use bugger all a lot. Bugger, I've burnt the toast. Bugger, I've got bugger all bread left to make any more toast.

Geoffm, I may have typed that wrong. It's the word "all" that I've never heard the British use with the word "bugger." They say something like "Bugger!" or "Bugger that!" in London. I've heard people from Western Australia add the word "all." They would say "Can't stand that lazy bloke 'cause he has bugger-all to do" or someone would say "Got anything new?" and his/her mate would say "got bugger-all."


25 LTBEWR : I know that the term bloody is rather profane, or was, in the UK and other UK conneced countries and territories. Perhaps it is a reference to woman's
26 Geoffm : Er... see highlighted section of quote - we use it a lot! (Reference means "I haven't got any bread") Actually, it supposedly derives from the ships
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