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Consistently Soft  
User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 1155 times:
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Another rejection today due to "soft" issues. My equipment is a Sony A350 with 18-70 mm lens and I am using upwards of F10 apareture with ISO 100 for static aircraft on the ramp.

I am chasing every camera setting to correct the problem. I've tried varying between spot to wide focus but obviously this is not working. I feel my images are nothing to compare to what I am seeing uploaded.

Today I will try shooting with Image Stability off.

The standards of getting a shot accepted is eluding me.

I know this topic has been covered but nothing recently.

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinedazbo5 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 2910 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1144 times:

Quoting baldwin8 (Thread starter):
The standards of getting a shot accepted is eluding me.

They are tough, but certainly not beyond most people. Maybe if you can post an original photo here we can give you some pointers? It may be your post processing that is the problem, not your photography. I'm more than happy to give a photo an edit if you want to contact me through my profile and email an original frame so I can walk you through my workflow and see what it comes out like. I'm off to the Maldives on Friday though so it'll have to be sooner rather than later.

Darren



Equipment: 2x Canon EOS 50D; Sigma 10-20 EX DC HSM, 50-500 EX APO DG, Canon 24-105 f/4 L, Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineseahawks7757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 160 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1127 times:

If I can ask are you shooting RAW or jpeg?

User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 1106 times:
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Quoting seahawks7757 (Reply 2):
If I can ask are you shooting RAW or jpeg?

Yes, I am shooting RAW, converting to TIFF for editing and final export to JPEG.

I will be changing editing software this weekend as I had be using Linux based products and likely be buying PS Elements.


User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9951 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1084 times:
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Quoting baldwin8 (Thread starter):
I am using upwards of F10 apareture with ISO 100 for static aircraft on the ramp.

Just a thought: for me at least, at ISO100 and F10, the shutter speed would be lower than I'd probably want it for regular shooting. Not low enough to cause major problems, but if you don't need the DOF that F10 provides, why not shoot at F8 or so and bump the shutter a bit? Could reduce tiny bits of camera shake.

Also, if you're shooting higher than F10, the lens might not be at its peak sharpness. I haven't found this to be a big problem on resized photos, but you never know.

My guess, however, would be that it's a post-processing issue. It took me awhile to get to grips with how sharp A.net wants its photos (so, how much sharpening I need to do after resizing). And every now and then, I'll forget and get a bunch of soft rejections.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1066 times:
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Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 4):
Just a thought: for me at least, at ISO100 and F10, the shutter speed would be lower than I'd probably want it for regular shooting. Not low enough to cause major problems, but if you don't need the DOF that F10 provides, why not shoot at F8 or so and bump the shutter a bit?
Also, if you're shooting higher than F10, the lens might not be at its peak sharpness.

My guess, however, would be that it's a post-processing issue. It took me awhile to get to grips with how sharp A.net wants its photos.

Thanks for the replies.

Your right maybe I don't need such a large DOF, and concentrate on shutter speeds of + 1/500.

It's difficult to compare when I see so many extremely crisp image uploaded everyday. Another member has graciously offered to have a look at my images so with a software update soon, I will hopefully be on the right track. I generally get to shoot 3 or 4 aircraft before the start of my shift here at YUL.

Everyone here has been very helpful.

Thanks again.


User currently offlineseahawks7757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 160 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 984 times:

One thing I would suggest when converting it, make sure you add some sharpness on the conversion, if you put it at 0 when converting it it'll be soft. I had the same issues a while ago and fixed it by bumping it up to 5 or so.

User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 963 times:
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Quoting seahawks7757 (Reply 6):
One thing I would suggest when converting it, make sure you add some sharpness on the conversion, if you put it at 0 when converting it it'll be soft. I had the same issues a while ago and fixed it by bumping it up to 5 or so.

In fact I was not sharpening it before converting and that seemed to be most of the problem. The Sony Image Convertor software is a bit different.

PS Elements 10 is now downloaded and will be working on my editing more in the following days.

Thanks to everyone.


User currently offlinedlednicer From United States of America, joined May 2005, 544 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 914 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR

I finally came to the conclusion that many of my "soft" rejections were a result of darker regions in the image not being sufficiently dark. Part of this is my monitor and part of this is my judgement when editing. I noticed that when I switched from a CRT to a flat screen monitor, the number of soft rejections I got increased noticeably.

Taking shots that are rejected as soft, in PhotoShop I move the dark (left) end of the histogram over 3-5% or sometimes use Darken Highlights. Usually, this results in an image that gets accepted on the second submission. Only rarely do I have to do more sharpening.


User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9951 posts, RR: 26
Reply 9, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 907 times:
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Quoting dlednicer (Reply 8):

That's a good point - low contrast can give a soft look to an image (as can overexposure, in my experience).

That's basically all that digital sharpening does - increase contrast between light and dark regions, just on a small scale to increase apparent sharpness.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 888 times:
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I think it is always good to cover some of the basics of Editing as many new people, like myself, need advice. I feel the "Editing in Photoshop" how to section is a bit dated with software updates. The basics are the same but layout on the application is different.

As well I find the recent thread "how not to oversharpen" is good in that we hear how others tackle sharpening.

[Edited 2012-09-14 15:36:53]

User currently offlineyerbol From Kazakhstan, joined Feb 2010, 219 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 864 times:
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Hi Craig,
Nice photo of A320 from Montreal!
Try to keep you hands steady as much as possible, find best aperture for your lens depending on light and do some spotting. Good taken photos out of your camera do not need a lot of post processing. In my opinion it is all about man behind the camera. Good luck!
PS. Wish to go to Canada and watch a couple of hockey games alive  



With best regards from Almaty
User currently offlinebaldwin8 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 11 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 637 times:
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I would just like to give an update to my "soft" issues I had.

It turns out my problem was largely my original kit lens 18-70 mm. After lengthy CTI (Consult The Internet) I found a review stating how poor this particular kit lens was. Sony has recently come out with a new DT 18-135 mm lens with great reviews and just released this spring. A local photoshop had this lens on sale under $100 of list price. I decided to purchase it and low and behold I'm getting much sharper images. The A350 being my first DSLR, I had no idea what a sharp image without editing should look like.

I am much happier doing my editing.


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