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Topic: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: DIJKKIJK
Posted 2006-11-18 10:01:00 and read 19388 times.

Can airplane engines be used for other purposes, besides powering airplanes?

I did read in this forum, about someone who was planning to use Convair 880 engines to generate electricity on an oil drilling platform, but the plan was abandoned.

Are there other, more successful examples?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 10:22:32 and read 19392 times.

Allison 501-D13 (T-56) engines are used in oil pipeline pumping installations, or at least they were when the first Alaskan pipeline was built.

I will do more research to verify, but I believe the BAe-146 engines share a core with the powerplant in the M1-A1 Abrams tank.

4 cylinder piston engines are/were used on those air boats used in swampy areas. The engine would drive a caged propeller, and steering is via move able rudders in the airstream.

Some railroads in western North America bought some surplus jet engines (forget model number-the type that was used on the P-2V Neptune and C-119) and mounted them to snowplows. They apparently did a great job ob blowing the tracks clear of snow. I imagine it would have been as impressive as hell...one of those first generation turbojets screaming away, creating a huge rooster tail of snow!

Paris Charles de Gaulle used to have an array of jet engines beside the runway to dissipate fog. They were fired up on request, and the airlines got a hefty bill. That was used as late as 1974 I think.

After Gulf War 1, when the Kuwaiti oilfields were ablaze, there was an oil field fire control company using MiG engines to blow the fires out.

While I'm thinking about tanks, the WW ll American tanks had radial engines, Franklins and Jacobs and Lycomings that were also used in aircraft.

Some ships have gas turbine engines, but I will need to research the commonality with aircraft.

In the 60's Ford Motor Company produced a PT-6 powered transport truck prototype. I'll find a picture...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BA777ER236
Posted 2006-11-18 10:32:34 and read 19385 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 1):
Some ships have gas turbine engines, but I will need to research the commonality with aircraft.

I believe that some of the RN Destroyers are powered by a combination of RR Tyne and RR Olympus engines. IIRC the Tynes are used for normal ops and the Olympuses for hi-speed dashes.

 Smile

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 10:40:22 and read 19379 times.

Yeah, I was just reading some Google results, and was surprised to see the Spey mentioned as well.

I think I was wrong about the PT-6, BTW. The Ford history pages don't mention it by name. Chrysler also had some experimental cars-its worth googling "Chrysler turbine car" and "Ford Turbine Truck" to see some groovy Jetsons automotive styling.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Djw030468
Posted 2006-11-18 11:23:32 and read 19364 times.

Our USCG WHEC 378' Cutter used two old 707 gas turbines as alternative propulsion to our main diesel engines, when higher speeds were required in SAR or Law Enforcement engagements. Nothing got your heart up to speed faster when you were in your 'rack' and hearing the MGT's (Main Gas Turbines) come on line, you knew something was up.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KBFIspotter
Posted 2006-11-18 11:43:22 and read 19359 times.

Several GE engines are used for power generation, as well as for propulsion in ships. For example, the USN Arleigh Burke class destroyers (DDG-51) use four GE LM2500 gas turbines, which, IIRC, are derived from the CF6 engine. I believe that the LM1500 is derived from the GE J-79, and is widely used in power generation.

Kris

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Pilotpip
Posted 2006-11-18 12:29:14 and read 19332 times.

Rotax sells airplane engines for use in snowmobilies and wave runners.

Or is it the other way around?  Smile

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Vc10
Posted 2006-11-18 12:32:00 and read 19335 times.

If you look at the following site then you will see that the Bristol Proteus engine was used in warships, hovercraft and power stations aswell as in aircraft. I have heard it said that it was better when not used on aircraft.  devil 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Proteus

littlevc10

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 12:34:52 and read 19323 times.

Quoting Djw030468 (Reply 4):
Our USCG WHEC 378' Cutter used two old 707 gas turbines as alternative propulsion to our main diesel engines, when higher speeds were required in SAR or Law Enforcement engagements. Nothing got your heart up to speed faster when you were in your 'rack' and hearing the MGT's (Main Gas Turbines) come on line, you knew something was up.

 thumbsup 

I just got goosebumps reading that. Well done Coast Guard.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Erj-145mech
Posted 2006-11-18 12:54:42 and read 19326 times.

I had an Allison V-1710 from a P-38 that was modified in the late 40's to run an irrigation water pump in west Texas.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 13:10:20 and read 19324 times.

Here's a picture of that jet snow-blower. I wonder if the boys ever decided to uncouple it from the locomotive and open 'er up?

Big version: Width: 573 Height: 330 File size: 54kb
Jet engine powered railway snow-blower. Notice the 'hearing protection required' stickers.


[Edited 2006-11-18 13:11:21]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: SP90
Posted 2006-11-18 14:24:04 and read 19282 times.

IIRC, turbocharged models of Subaru's EJ20, EJ22 and EJ25 engines are sometimes used on small propeller planes. The compact design of the boxer engine makes it ideal for fitting into the small spaces. Keep in mind these engines are usually found in cars like the Impreza, Legacy and Forester.

[Edited 2006-11-18 14:28:01]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: DIJKKIJK
Posted 2006-11-18 17:18:30 and read 19214 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 10):

Thanks for all that info.  bigthumbsup 

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 71Zulu
Posted 2006-11-18 17:42:18 and read 19210 times.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: DC8FriendShip
Posted 2006-11-18 18:07:40 and read 19208 times.

I recall Union Pacific had turbine powered locomotives at one time. I've also seen them mounted on the rear of a truck to dry a wet racetrack.
Turbines are also widely used as as a ground air start unit for aircraft with inop or no APU's.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: SlamClick
Posted 2006-11-18 18:17:52 and read 19200 times.

I remember a small "gyppo" sawmill in the Pacific northwest that was run by a single Allison V-1710.

I also saw an 18-wheel lumber truck powered by an Allison. IIRC it was about a 1950 or so, Stirling. He ran it with no side panels on the hood and you could see the big V-12 in there.

I know a USAF radar station that uses a British-made gas turbine engine to generate electricity. The small base uses electricity purchased from the local utility company. It constantly samples the incoming power and if a power loss is sensed, the engine is signalled to start. One hundred and ten 1-volt batteries, each bigger than the battery in your car, (beaucoup plate area!) connected in series, crank an electric starter on the turbine. When it comes up to speed and its output is stable the base unplugs from the power company and it takes over. It has surplus capacity sufficient to backfeed the power line to the nearby town.

Gas turbine engines in stationary use, like generators and pumping stations probably run a very long time between overhauls.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Avt007
Posted 2006-11-18 18:29:07 and read 19189 times.

Turbines are still in use in the oil industry for power generation and pumping purposes.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Airfoilsguy
Posted 2006-11-18 18:37:29 and read 19185 times.

I have seen jet engines used to dry race tracks

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-18 18:54:57 and read 19179 times.




Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 6):
Rotax sells airplane engines for use in snowmobilies and wave runners.

Or is it the other way around?

 rotfl 


An old friend of mine uses a small jet engine to clear his corporation's private runway. The engine is mounted to a trailer...they fire it up, drive along the edge of the runway, and irritate the neighbors.  biggrin 



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: David L
Posted 2006-11-18 20:35:29 and read 19141 times.

Rover used their war-time jet engine experience to produce a turbine powered car in 1950, having started work on it in 1946:

http://www.makingthemodernworld.org....ntion/technology/1939-1968/IC.061/

http://www.pistonheads.com/doc.asp?c=104&i=6165

It didn't take off.

... I'll get me coat.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 22:23:50 and read 19109 times.

...And I just remembered that there were Allison V-12 powered air raid sirens back in the 50's / 60's. I grew up about 10 miles from a major city that tested them every Saturday at 13:00. Even ten miles away they were scary as hell.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: DC8FriendShip
Posted 2006-11-18 22:43:14 and read 19092 times.

Tucker used a six cylinder helicopter engine in the fifty examples of his car.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-18 23:21:55 and read 19083 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 10):

In the 1950's and 60's, the Union Pacific railroad also tried turbine-powered locomotives:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Union_Pacific_18.jpg

Because many of these locomotives were built by ALCO, and the electric components were supplied by GE, my guess is that it had a GE engine in it, but I am not sure on that. Supposedly, these were the most powerful locomotives ever built, developing 10,000 horsepower.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Jetstar
Posted 2006-11-18 23:22:21 and read 19068 times.

Many years ago when I first started out in aviation, I was working at a repair station and one of our mechanics who had worked on J-47’s in the Air Force used to go to Yonkers Raceway every November to change the oil and fuel filters and start up for the winter season the J-47’s that the racetrack had mounted on trucks to clear snow from the track.

Also every once in a while during the winter he would also have to go and work on the engines when one of them would not start or run properly. This lasted for about 2 years when Yonkers decided to do their own maintenance.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Ryan h
Posted 2006-11-18 23:44:52 and read 19055 times.

Down at Parafield airport which is a small GA airport here in Adelaide, there is a museum (Classic Jets Fighter Museum) that have an Allison that they run and some sort of jet engine that is run occasionally.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-18 23:51:01 and read 19079 times.

Quoting DIJKKIJK (Reply 12):
Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 10):


Thanks for all that info.

No problem, anytime you need a blank photo, just give me a call. Beats me why the image won't load, and since I'm not an extra effort kind of person, I'll simply direct you to this link:

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/cn61607.jpg

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: JetMech
Posted 2006-11-19 00:17:02 and read 19444 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 25):

What an awesome looking piece of machinery. It looks like it could almost blow the rails away as well! That beast would most certainly make some noise!



Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 1):
forget model number-the type that was used on the P-2V Neptune

Were these engines Westinghouse J34-WE-36's  Confused .

Rolls -Royce uses a derivative of the Trent-800 aero-engine as the basis for it's MT30 ship propulsion gas-turbine. It has about 80% commonality with the T-800, and can output up to 36MW at a thermal efficiency exceeding 40%.



http://www.rolls-royce.com/marine/pr..._gas_turbine/gas_turbines/mt30.jsp

Regards, JetMech

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: MD11Engineer
Posted 2006-11-19 01:18:06 and read 19434 times.

A guy I know in the Netherlands owns a WW2 M-18 tank destroyer (fast, lighly armoured tracked vehicle armed with a powerfull A/T gun), which uses a Franklin radial engine. Since I have a bit of experience with aircraft radial engines he let me start it once. It was like starting an aircraft.

Jan

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-19 01:36:50 and read 19399 times.

Quoting David L (Reply 19):
Rover used their war-time jet engine experience to produce a turbine powered car in 1950, having started work on it in 1946:

http://www.makingthemodernworld.org....ntion/technology/1939-1968/IC.061/

http://www.pistonheads.com/doc.asp?c=104&i=6165

It didn't take off.

Two problems IIRC were the lag when the engine "waited" to spool up and awful fuel consumption. This latter in spite of heat recovery units being fitted. Not one of Rover's most sparkling ideas, but then read Whittle on the whole subject of Rover's "contribution" to the development of jet engines in the UK! He was certainly biased, but if half what he wrote was true Rover should have been ashamed.

And folk write about how governments interfere with Airbus, thanks very much Rover showed that private industry can do a superb job along these lines!

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: StealthZ
Posted 2006-11-19 02:09:04 and read 19393 times.

The Queen Mary II has a combination of Diesel and Turbine powerplants both used for electricity generation. Propulsion is via 4 podded electric motors.
What makes the QM II unusual is that the 2 LM2500(Land/Marine versions of the GE CF6) are not housed in the engine room but in a special upper deck housing directly under the funnel.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KBFIspotter
Posted 2006-11-19 02:20:37 and read 19389 times.

Quoting StealthZ (Reply 29):
What makes the QM II unusual is that the 2 LM2500(Land/Marine versions of the GE CF6) are not housed in the engine room but in a special upper deck housing directly under the funnel.

I remember reading somewhere that the LM2500's are not for propulsion, but are to provide back up power for the ship if demand exceeds the primary generators, or if the primarys fail.

Kris

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: MrChips
Posted 2006-11-19 03:32:21 and read 19355 times.

Quoting Avt007 (Reply 16):
Turbines are still in use in the oil industry for power generation and pumping purposes.

Correct. if I recall correctly, many of the compressor stations along the Trans-Canada pipeline are powered by derivatives of RR engines - chiefly the RB211 and the Avon.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Lowrider
Posted 2006-11-19 03:53:17 and read 19332 times.

I believe that Lycoming produced an O-290G, specifically to power ground equipment. Does anyone know where Chevy got the idea for the Corvair engine?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: AeroWeanie
Posted 2006-11-19 04:18:31 and read 19342 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 1):
Allison 501-D13 (T-56) engines are used in oil pipeline pumping installations, or at least they were when the first Alaskan pipeline was built.

The Trans Alaska Pipeline uses Rolls Royce Avon engines for pumping. For more info on their on-going replacement: http://www.alyeska-pipe.com/Strategi...guration/Crude_oil_pump_system.pdf

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 1):
I will do more research to verify, but I believe the BAe-146 engines share a core with the powerplant in the M1-A1 Abrams tank.

Almost - the core of the BAe-146's ALF502s is the Lycoming T55, also used to power the Boeing CH-47 Chinook. The AGT1500 in the M1 is a different, lower power engine (only 1500 hp, vs. about 3500 hp of the T55).

Other uses of aero engines:

The STP-Paxton Turbine Car, raced at the 1967 Indy 500 was powered by a P&WC ST6B-62, a PT6B derivative:
http://www.forix.com/8w/altpower/pj-indy67-stp-paxton.jpg

The Lotus 56s raced at the 1968 Indy 500 were powered by P&WC ST6B-70s, again PT6B derivatives:
http://www.forix.com/8w/altpower/gh-indy68-lotus56.jpg

The United Aircraft TurboTrain (built by Sikorsky) was also powered by a ST6:


The ANF-Frangeco and Rohr Turboliner trainsets are powered by Turbomeca Makilas (as found in Aerospatiale Super Pumas):


In a more extreme use, the Soviets built chemical warfare decontamination vehicles that used old surplus jet engines to spray cleaning agents on contaminated vehicles:
http://www.army.cz/images/id_5001_6000/5032/01.jpg

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: FutureUApilot
Posted 2006-11-19 04:53:50 and read 19326 times.

These are always fun:



-Sam

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-19 05:54:21 and read 19275 times.

And, while I know it has been discredited, the Darwin awards story about the Chevy Impala and the Jato rocket is in my hit parade of favourite all-time alternate uses for an aeronautical powerplant.

I do like the jet drag cars too, and I actually saw Andy Granatelli's turbine Indy car race, I wonder why I forgot it?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: TrijetsRMissed
Posted 2006-11-19 06:23:25 and read 19276 times.

Quoting DIJKKIJK (Thread starter):
Can airplane engines be used for other purposes, besides powering airplanes?

On the DC-10 the wing engines produce electricity for the CVR. This is why there is no CVR transcript for flight 191 following rotation.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-19 06:52:52 and read 19284 times.

Here's one possible alternate use of aircraft engines (in this case, three afterburning GE J79's):

Big version: Width: 748 Height: 497 File size: 56kb
Wes Shockley's Shockwave truck. Truly awesome sight!!!


Les Schockley, and the world's fastest Peterbilt (AKA Shockwave)  Wink

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-19 06:59:40 and read 19268 times.



A certain jet engine is also used (quite effectively, I might add) to completely destroy any shred of beauty and grace of a certain Waco biplane that frequents the airshow circuit...



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-19 07:12:16 and read 19268 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 22):
Because many of these locomotives were built by ALCO, and the electric components were supplied by GE, my guess is that it had a GE engine in it, but I am not sure on that. Supposedly, these were the most powerful locomotives ever built, developing 10,000 horsepower.

The Union Pacific "Big Blows" (yes, that's really what the crews called 'em  Wink ) were powered by a modified GE power generation turbine, which has very little, if anything, in common with an aircraft engine. These turbines are what are used in Natural Gas power generating stations. They actually generated electricity (by turning a generator), and each axle on the locomotive contained a traction motor, a gigantic DC motor.

The turbines were designed to burn "Bunker-C" fuel (the same fuel that Union Pacific's oil-fired steam locomotives burned), however this proved to be their Achille's heel: the price of this particular petroleum product skyrocketed in the late 1960's, and the Union Pacific studied modification to allow the units to burn other fuels, but there was no economical alternative  Sad

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-19 08:27:49 and read 19223 times.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 38):
A certain jet engine is also used (quite effectively, I might add) to completely destroy any shred of beauty and grace of a certain Waco biplane that frequents the airshow circuit...

ugh! I can't believe how ugly and graceless that Waco is. "Flying" had an achingly beautiful upf-7 on the cover of one of the 1969 issues-it was one of many things that made me spend all my teen earnings at the local flying school.

To see such piece of sculpture wrecked by money and bad taste makes me ill.

The Peterbilt, on the other hand, has always suffered for the lack of J-79's, and that "Shockwave" truck looks like just right  Smile

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Erj-145mech
Posted 2006-11-19 13:33:18 and read 19150 times.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 32):
Does anyone know where Chevy got the idea for the Corvair engine?

The designer owned a Beech Bonanza, that had a Continental E-225, and patterned the Corvair 140 after that. The 140 was used in the 1960 models, and was upgraded to the 145 after 1961 year models in production.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: TheSorcerer
Posted 2006-11-19 13:40:02 and read 19146 times.

Quoting DIJKKIJK (Thread starter):
Convair 880 engines to generate electricity on an oil drilling platform, but the plan was abandoned.

I've never heard of old jet engines being used on oil rigs. The rig that my dad did some work on, has GE turbines for electricity. I'm not sure which model, i can find out if anyone wants to know.

Dominic

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-19 14:09:15 and read 19134 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 39):

Oh, well, not a true aircraft-engine powered unit, but at least it had a gas turbine in it. I would have loved to hear that thing in operation..."what's that sound?...Its a fighter jet, its a rocket...no its a locomotive"  smile 

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 39):
They actually generated electricity (by turning a generator), and each axle on the locomotive contained a traction motor, a gigantic DC motor.

All of today's locomotives today have a similar concept. A huge diesel V-12 powers a 1 mW generator creating DC current. The DC current is then turned into AC, which goes to the traction motors, turned back into DC, and used to power each traction motor's particular truck.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Chksix
Posted 2006-11-19 14:45:23 and read 19132 times.

The Stena Line HSS 1500 are powered by 4 GE turbines. Said to be similar to the ones on the 747.

Swedish only:  Sad
http://www.stenaline.com/stena_line/...h_fartyg/sv/vara_fartyg_13872.html

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: David L
Posted 2006-11-19 15:02:01 and read 19129 times.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 28):
but then read Whittle on the whole subject of Rover's "contribution" to the development of jet engines in the UK! He was certainly biased, but if half what he wrote was true Rover should have been ashamed.

Without a doubt, though there were also those in government departments who seemed determined to swipe everything away from Whittle.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 28):
And folk write about how governments interfere with Airbus, thanks very much Rover showed that private industry can do a superb job along these lines!

Perhaps that's why successive UK governments felt the need to spend the next 25 years proving that they were the masters of destructive interference.  Sad

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: SlamClick
Posted 2006-11-19 16:25:25 and read 19103 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 35):
I do like the jet drag cars too, and I actually saw Andy Granatelli's turbine Indy car race, I wonder why I forgot it?

I came into this a little too late. I was off looking for pictures of the original "Green Monster" that drag racing legend Art Arfons used to run back in the late 50s. All I could find were later iterations, powered by the faster, but less exciting jet engines.

The original had an Allison V-1710, a tugboat clutch and a tank differential. It was colorful and a huge favorite with the crowds.

I also remember one of those "footnote" cars that never did much, I think it might have been driven by Dave Janas. It was powered by a little four-cylinder air-cooled airplane engine, maybe an O-200. As I said, it was just there to give Don Garlits a chance to fuel up and get ready for his next run.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-19 17:18:55 and read 19061 times.

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 27):
A guy I know in the Netherlands owns a WW2 M-18 tank destroyer (fast, lighly armoured tracked vehicle armed with a powerfull A/T gun), which uses a Franklin radial engine. Since I have a bit of experience with aircraft radial engines he let me start it once. It was like starting an aircraft.

Jan

I don't believe Franklin (Aircooled Motors) ever built a radial of their own design. What your friend probably has is a Wright R975 or a Continental radial. Franklin may have produced them under license.

Now....to my main topic. I worked for a company that produced turbine fuel management products and I was commissioned to do a market study of industrial and marine gas turbines to see what was out there using their product. Going back to my research notes for the project I found in no particular order

United Technologies FT8 (JT8 derivative), GG/FT4 (JT4 derivative) FT9 (JT9 derivative) FT3 (JT3 derivative) FT4000 (PW4000 derivative)
Rolls industrial Avon, RB211, Spey, Trent. Olympus, Proteus, Tyne
GE LM6000 (CF6 derivative). LM8000 (CF6-80) LM500 (TF34) LM120 (T700 derivative)
P&W-Canada ST6 (PT6 derivative), ST18 (PW100 derivative)
Rolls/Allison 570, 501, 601 (501 derivative)
Rolls/Turbomeca RTM322
Turbomeca Astazou, Bastan, Turmo, Makila a/k/a TM1600

Bet-Shemesh M2TL (Turbomeca Marbore derivative)

Orenda OT2, OT3

Vericor TF/ASE40 (Lycoming T55 derivative)

I'm sure there are many more in the gas turbine field, particularly in Russia and china where vast numbers (probably more than 30,000) of TV2 engines of about 1500-2000 shp were produced in many configurations and my research revealed that many of them are being used in oilfield and gas pipeline applications. They are a GOOD engine.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-19 18:11:20 and read 19064 times.




This one has an interesting caption:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Barry J Collman



Although this registration was cancelled on 03Aug05, as being exported to Australia, it was found here, parked and engineless. (Later note: Thanks to Cory Watkins at Guthrie, I now know that an Australian farmer purchased just the engines, as powerplants for farm equipment. The rest of the aircraft is to be scrapped).



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Jetstar
Posted 2006-11-19 21:43:00 and read 18986 times.

2H4

This is a little off of this thread, but this JetStar s/n 5101 brings back a lot of memories because it is the first JetStar I ever worked on.

I started working for a repair station in 1968 on general aviation airplanes. About one half of this company’s business was supplying additional mechanics to some of the corporate operators on the airport when they were doing maintenance on their airplanes. On only about my second week on the job I was sent over to the company who owned this JetStar with 3 other of our mechanics to assist their mechanic doing at the time an annual inspection. I got to work on this JetStar quite often and other JetStar’s based on the airport during my 3 years with this repair station and also got to work on almost all the other corporate aircraft types at the time. It was because of my JetStar experience and networking that I was able to get my JetStar jobs.

The company later bought a G2 and sold this JetStar to another company on the airport. The second company was the one who upgraded it to the 731 engines and it remained with this company until they were taken over by a corporate raider in the early 1980’s and the airplane was then sold. I have seen over the years listed by different aircraft brokers.

This JetStar was built in 1966 in the heyday of JetStar production so the airframe is now 40 years old so I doubt anyone would invest any money to get it back into flying shape.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-11-19 22:56:56 and read 18941 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 22):
Supposedly, these were the most powerful locomotives ever built, developing 10,000 horsepower.

I don't know if you can do a straight conversion from kW on an electric train to hp on a turbine-electric, but if you can: Most TGV trains comfortably exceed 8500 kW, which is 11500 hp. Eurostar has 12240 kW, or over 16500 hp.

Then again, they are cheating since they use at least two motor units.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Ryan h
Posted 2006-11-19 23:04:53 and read 18877 times.

I think the boat Donald Campbell died in was powered by a jet engine.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-19 23:16:15 and read 18865 times.

In fact, the unlimited hydroplane series that used to be run had biggish boats all running RR Merlins. I think they tried Griffins as well back in the 60's. A dozen of those things running around the closed course at Belle Isle sounded magnificent.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Jamesbuk
Posted 2006-11-19 23:20:30 and read 18858 times.

Quoting DIJKKIJK (Thread starter):
Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?

Ask Richard Hammond  Wink

They are used in alot of Jet cars, Track drying, Film set (wind) and many other weird and wonderful things.

Rgds --James--

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-19 23:24:35 and read 18853 times.




Quoting Jetstar (Reply 49):

Thanks for the info, Jetstar. Your contributions always prove to be very educational and interesting.



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BuyantUkhaa
Posted 2006-11-19 23:46:03 and read 18866 times.

The first TGV prototype (the TGV001) was propelled by gas turbines rather than electric engines:

It was originally planned that the TGV, then standing for très grande vitesse (very high speed) or turbine grande vitesse (high speed turbine), would be propelled by gas turbine-electric locomotives. Gas turbines were selected for their small size, good power-to-weight ratio, and ability to deliver a high power output over an extended period of time. The first prototype, TGV 001, was the only TGV constructed with this type of engine - following the sharp increase in the price of oil during the 1973 energy crisis, gas turbines were deemed impractical and the project turned to electricity from overhead lines. The electricity was to be generated by France's new nuclear power stations.

However, TGV 001 was not a wasted prototype. Its gas-turbine powerplant was only one of many technologies required for high-speed rail travel. It also tested high-speed brakes, which were needed to dissipate the large amount of kinetic energy amassed by a train operating at high speed, high-speed aerodynamics and signalling. It was articulated, meaning that its two carriages shared a bogie between them which allowed them to move freely with respect to one another. It reached 318 km/h (198 mph), which remains the world speed record for a non-electric train. Its interior and exterior were styled by British-born designer Jack Cooper, whose work formed the basis of all subsequent TGV design, including the distinctive nose shape of TGV power cars.
[...]

This turbotrain was built in a radically different fashion than its predecessors (the ETG and the RTG); it was composed of two locomotives and three carriages, all with driving wheels. This concept as well as the shape of the TGV 001 was kept when designing the future TGV.

Each axle was equipped with electric engines with the advantage of small weight per axle but maximum power. Electric traction permitted dynamic braking, particularly effective at high speeds. Each locomotive was equipped with two turbines (TURMO III G then TURMO X), also used in the Super Frelons helicopters. As well as having direct control of the turbines, the locomotives were equipped with traction, braking and signalling controls.

The TGV 001 was an articulated train; each carriage shared one bogie with the next. This setup ensured greater stability and permitted placing the suspension to be placed near the centre of gravity of each carriage, thus reducing rolling in curves.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TGV_001





As you can see on the next pictures, the power cars were articulated too, unlike the later TGV series:

http://cu.cult.bg/gallery/bahn/tgv001rs.jpg

http://www.emdx.org/rail/30ansTGV/images/figure00.jpg

http://www.emdx.org/rail/30ansTGV/

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Zkpilot
Posted 2006-11-20 00:01:20 and read 18837 times.

I heard a couple of years ago about buses being powered by gasturbine engines. They were mounted in the rear and used to generate electricity for electrically powered wheels I think... I think there are a few here in Auckland and some in Australia, not sure about elsewhere.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KBFIspotter
Posted 2006-11-20 00:45:12 and read 18830 times.

I cannot believe I forgot about the Marine Turbine Technologies Superbike!

The bike is powered by a Rolls Royce Allison A-250-C18 turboshaft from a Bell 206 Jetranger.

Jay Leno has one...

Kris

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: StealthZ
Posted 2006-11-20 01:26:25 and read 18786 times.

Quoting Ryan h (Reply 51):
I think the boat Donald Campbell died in was powered by a jet engine.

It was and the Bluebird LSR car that he gained the World Land Speed record on Australia's Lake Eyre in 1964 was powered by a Proteus Turbine engine driving all 4 wheels, interestingly the Proteus travelled faster in that car than it ever did attached to the wing of an aeroplane

Quoting KBFIspotter (Reply 30):
I remember reading somewhere that the LM2500's are not for propulsion, but are to provide back up power for the ship if demand exceeds the primary generators, or if the primarys fail.

Well yes & no, my understanding of the power generation and propulsion systems of the QM2 is that all electricity is available for all purposes and distributed accordingly.
The QM2 can maintain the leisurely cruise speeds of say a Caribbean cruise and provide hotel power on it's Wartsilla diesels but cannot achieve the 28+knot trans Atlantic speeds and hotel power without the assistance of the LM2500. The unusual placement of the turbines saves a huge amount of space because the trunking needed to provide the huge amounts of air the LM2550 require is not needed.

The discussions regarding the turbine powered TGV are interesting because the SNCF did actually have a "TurboTrain" in regular service, I rode one from Paris to Calais in 1989 and from inside as it started up, it sounded just like an airliner. Interestingly my destination was the Hovercraft terminal and a ride to England on the Proteus powered SRN-4 and had a couple of months earlier taken an Allison turbine powered Boeing Jetfoil from Dover to Belgium.

Cheers

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Domokun
Posted 2006-11-20 04:53:14 and read 18727 times.

Jet engines were also used to power the Soviet Ekranoplan's. Sort of an 'alternative use.'

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-20 08:08:14 and read 18696 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 43):
All of today's locomotives today have a similar concept. A huge diesel V-12 powers a 1 mW generator creating DC current. The DC current is then turned into AC, which goes to the traction motors, turned back into DC, and used to power each traction motor's particular truck.

Well, in the US at least, diesel locomotives have been diesel-electric locomotives since the 1920's, when GE proved the reliability of the concept. A small company called the Electromotive Corporation really ran with the idea, and became the Electro-Motive division of General Motors in 1938....and several different diesel prime movers (that's what they're called in a diesel electric locomotive) have been used over the years. The largest (size-wise, at least, not output-wise) was the EMD 645E3, which was a two-stroke V-20 (yes that's right, 20 cylinders) turbocharged prime mover (3600 HP). By the way, the 645 engine designation means that each cylinder displaces 645 cubic inches. To put this into perspective, the Ford 302 (302 cubic inches) V-8 displaces 4944 cubic centimeters over 8 cylinders.

The largest diesels used in North American diesel electric locomotives currently put out about 6500-7000 horsepower. Small diesel-electric switchers use 6 or 8 cylinder prime movers, and have horsepower ratings around 1000 horsepower.

The strangest prime mover in railroad usage had to be the Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston engines: two crankshafts, and two pistons per cylinder (apparently, these diesels were originally quite successful submarine engines before being used on locomotives).

I could talk your ear off on diesel electric locomotives, but nevertheless, this is Airliners.net, not locomotives.net  Wink

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Brenintw
Posted 2006-11-20 08:13:02 and read 18690 times.

There's a guy who has a Ford Capri with very stretched hood and RR grille that has a de-rated RR Merlin Aero Engine tucked under it. In the mid-70's it was recognized in the Guiness Book of Records as the world's fastest road car, hitting 200 mph (321 km/h) on the Autobahns.

I believe it still exists in the UK, having been rebuilt extensively following a fire -- the RR grille has been removed following threats of legal action.

Edit: article from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolls-Royce_Merlin#Automotive

[Edited 2006-11-20 08:36:15]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-20 08:20:28 and read 18683 times.

Quoting Brenintw (Reply 61):
There's a guy who has a Ford Capri with very stretched hood and RR grille that has a de-rated RR Merlin Aero Engine tucked under it. In the mid-70's it was recognized in the Guiness Book of Records as the world's fastest road car, hitting 200 mph (321 km/h) on the Autobahns

In the US, RR Merlins (and even Griffons!) have been popular choices for tractor pull competitors, who modify farm tractors to try to outpull their competitors. I hear the torque output of these engines is second to none.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: L-188
Posted 2006-11-20 09:07:44 and read 18672 times.

Quoting DIJKKIJK (Thread starter):
Can airplane engines be used for other purposes, besides powering airplanes

Other then the mentioned airboat motors a couple of other uses.

Lycoming 0-290's where used in military ground power units
The 220 Horse Continential was used in both the Stearman Biplane and the WWII Lee Tank.
There was a guy who but the T-53 off a Huey in his purse seiner. I think it worked until the heat from the engine compartment melted his net.

Edit: Forgot about the fact that 3 Allison V-1710's was a popular WWII PT boat combination.
Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 6):
Rotax sells airplane engines for use in snowmobilies and wave runner

It is the other way around.....Rotax started life making motors for Bombardiar branded snow-machines, such a Polaris.

[Edited 2006-11-20 09:10:47]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Speedracer1407
Posted 2006-11-20 09:16:03 and read 18663 times.

I thought I might add the Howmet turbine LeMans racer of the late 60s. When I was 15 and a raging car nut, a family friend who worked for the independent automotive engineer, Bob McKee, took me to his "office" to see the Howmet being restored. Unfortunately, I had neither the knowledge or the perspective to appreciate meeting McKee and being able to wander freely around his shop. The next year, I was shocked to see McKee and the restored Howmet at the June Sprints (it might have been the vintage race) in Elkhard Lake, WI (road America). I recall that they had to jack the car up to start it (no neutral in the transmission or something like that). The driver let the revs build up too much, and when they lowered the car, it left a few dozen feet of rubber down pit lane. I also recall the amazing noise that thing made down the back straight between turns 3 and 5: Kinda like KITT from Night Rider. Actaully, exactly like KITT because it sounded fake, or at least just unnatural.

Anyway, it originally used a Continental helicopter unit, which was replaced with an Allison for the restoration.

O

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BAe146QT
Posted 2006-11-20 10:37:14 and read 18627 times.

Bizarre - I was talking with my father in law about this very thing last night.

The Centurion tank used a de-rated Merlin engine with the supercharger removed. In this application it was called the Meteor.

Quote:
I have seen jet engines used to dry race tracks

True. Santa Pod raceway, (actually a drag strip) has what appears to be a low-bypass turbofan, with a nozzle that directs the exhaust downwards onto the tarmac. This contraption is mounted on a *very heavy* trailer which is pulled along by a tractor.

I'm not sure how the intake works - it must be caged or something. I didn't examine the thing too closely since I was busying myself with getting as far away from it as possible while still remaining in the grounds.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-11-20 13:16:52 and read 18594 times.

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 65):
The Centurion tank used a de-rated Merlin engine with the supercharger removed. In this application it was called the Meteor.

Yepp. Have seen a few of those rumble by in the Swedish Army.

Also the Swedish S Tank uses a diesel AND a turbine for propulsion. The turbine is either Boeing or Caterpillar depending on version. The turbine was used for additional power at high speed.

The S is one of the weirdest solutions ever for a main battle tank btw. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S_tank

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BAe146QT
Posted 2006-11-20 13:51:13 and read 18581 times.

That is kind of odd, yes.

Apropos of nothing, you have to admire the Swedish military. If a piece of hardware doesn't exist already, they just go out to their machine shop and *make* it.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-20 14:35:27 and read 18568 times.

Quoting David L (Reply 45):
Quoting Baroque (Reply 28):
And folk write about how governments interfere with Airbus, thanks very much Rover showed that private industry can do a superb job along these lines!

Perhaps that's why successive UK governments felt the need to spend the next 25 years proving that they were the masters of destructive interference. Sad

It is a while since I read Whittle, but there were really three phases of difficulty. The first with his own Ministry mostly before WWII which seemed to be unable to come to terms with the fact that they had one of the greatest inventors of the century in their ranks.

Then there was the commercial bastardry of Rover. RR were better when even the Ministry realised Rover were hopeless. But even RR were not knights in shining armour re Power Jets.

Then after the war there was the straight out theft of Power Jets intellectual property by GoUK. While there was a licence fee paid for the Merlin by the US (but I have never seen how much) it appears the Power Jets designs were a straight gift to the US, and of course giving them to Russia was a really bright strategy. Then the scandalous delay before an award could be made to Whittle in lieu of his work and the way in which it was made. Any interested in organizational disfunction should read the later parts of Whittle for some succinct summaries of what he encountered.

Part of his trouble with government was that they viewed him as one of them and therefore he had no business being an inventor! Oh the problems of sclerotic minds, and they are still with us - both the problems and the minds!!  banghead 

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-20 14:56:46 and read 18561 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 60):
By the way, the 645 engine designation means that each cylinder displaces 645 cubic inches.

Wasn't EMD's 710 engine the most popular?

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 60):
I could talk your ear off on diesel electric locomotives, but nevertheless, this is Airliners.net, not locomotives.net  

Nice, so I take it you're a railroad guy too? Of course, deviations are allowed on A.Net biggrin 

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-11-20 15:19:44 and read 18560 times.

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 67):

Apropos of nothing, you have to admire the Swedish military. If a piece of hardware doesn't exist already, they just go out to their machine shop and *make* it.

Yeah. But nowadays the MBT is german. The APC/IFV is still Swedish though.

Quoting David L (Reply 45):

Perhaps that's why successive UK governments felt the need to spend the next 25 years proving that they were the masters of destructive interference.

This site has lots of snide comments about that: http://www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk/contents.html. It's fantastic reading overall in the "history" sections.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-20 16:50:24 and read 18516 times.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 68):
Then after the war there was the straight out theft of Power Jets intellectual property by GoUK. While there was a licence fee paid for the Merlin by the US (but I have never seen how much) it appears the Power Jets designs were a straight gift to the US, and of course giving them to Russia was a really bright strategy.

I think that a certain amount of what you refer to happened because there was a real question in a lot of people's minds as to whether Britain would be invaded. Thus technology transfer to the states. I do not think people were thinking long term then...the task at hand was to kick Hitler's ass and the arguing among friends could take place when that was done.

I believe the cavity magnetron was in that trunk of blueprints as well, although there's some substance to the notion that the cavity magnetron was, after all, a General Electric (US) invention that had to be reimported before they understood its significance to centimetric RDF a/k/a radar.

On the other hand, actions of the UK government in giving the Rolls Royce Nene to the USSR made the MiG-15 a doable project which led directly to the deaths of American fliers in the Korean police action....that had to be one of the stupidest things any government has ever done anywhere-you have to go back to the Spanish Armada for idiocy on a scale like that.

As a point of information, we had a GE I-16 in the shop at the tech school I went to and although it was not a runner (missing some gearing) it was interesting to take it apart and see how it was made. That was a first generation iteration of the Whittle engine. It was not built for ease of maintenance either.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-20 17:17:43 and read 18516 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 69):
Wasn't EMD's 710 engine the most popular?

Nope. Just the most recent design...

The most prolific EMD engine would be the EMD 567E series-it was built in the most numbers, and is used in many non-railroad applications, like ships and stationary emergency power generation at hospitals.

All of the EMD "number series" engines are two-stroke diesels. This gave EMD a significant power-to-weight ratio advantage over their competitors in the 1940's. If you hang out near trains, compare the sound of and EMD locomotive to that of a GE locomotive sometime  Wink There is no comparison.

BTW, the EMD 567 was designed by a guy at GM named Kettering, who was also responsible for the Detroit Diesel 2-stroke engine used in trucks and busses, and one of the most famous Cadillac engines...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: AeroWeanie
Posted 2006-11-20 19:09:05 and read 18464 times.

I forgot another alternative use of aircraft engines. Racing hydroplanes have long used aircraft engines. In the old days, it was Merlins, Allisons and Griffons and lately it has been Lycoming T55s.

Rolls Royce Merlin:
http://www.vintageraceboatshop.com/images/Detroit-2004/Slo-Mo-Shun%20V.jpg

Allison V-1710:
http://www.unlimitedsdetroit.com/images/the60s/hk_smirnoff90.jpg

Rolls Royce Griffon:
http://www.thunderboats.org/80budweiser/images/80budweiser01.jpg

Lycoming T55:

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-20 19:34:55 and read 18439 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 72):

Thanks for the info. You know when you're a railroad guy when you can tell the sound difference between EMD's 2-stoke diesels to GE's 4-stroke diesels. What about ALCOs (a scenic railroad not to far from where I live uses the FPA-4 "Covered Wagons," and a C420: all vintage equipment of course)?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-20 20:11:08 and read 18424 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 74):
What about ALCOs (a scenic railroad not to far from where I live uses the FPA-4 "Covered Wagons," and a C420: all vintage equipment of course)?

They were before my time  Wink I've heard the McIntosh & Seymour prime mover employed by the ALCO's (4-stroke) makes a sound all it's own. I've heard that when the engineer puts the throttle at idle, the RPM's in the prime mover get so low that the observer thinks the engine is going to die...but suprisingly, it enters idle succesfully  Wink I've also seen plenty of railroad pictures of ALCO's spewing prodigious amounts of black smoke when given high throttle settings Big grin

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-20 23:10:57 and read 18345 times.

It is also worthy of note that the US Sherman Tank (of World War II fame) used a 9-cylinder Continental radial (adapted from an aircraft design) as it's powerplant...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-21 00:18:55 and read 18311 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 75):
I've also seen plenty of railroad pictures of ALCO's spewing prodigious amounts of black smoke when given high throttle settings

Same here, at that scenic railroad I mentioned, when the C420 gets going from being still, it spews out black smoke like crazy as the engine tries hard works get the train going via the traction motors.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: AeroWeanie
Posted 2006-11-21 08:07:49 and read 18195 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 76):
It is also worthy of note that the US Sherman Tank (of World War II fame) used a 9-cylinder Continental radial (adapted from an aircraft design) as it's powerplant...

Some Shermans did have Continental R975 radial engines. Others had a range of engines, including 500 hp Ford V-8s, Chrysler A57 multibank 30-cylinder engines, and GM 6046 2x6 diesel engines.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: StealthZ
Posted 2006-11-21 12:40:16 and read 18146 times.

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 78):
Chrysler A57 multibank 30-cylinder engines

Is that the one the good Captain Click was referring to in reply 22 of this thread...

http://www1.airliners.net/discussions/military/read.main/57564/

Cheers

Chris

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: AeroWeanie
Posted 2006-11-21 18:40:09 and read 18072 times.

Yup, that's the monster. Five inline 6's joined with a single driveshaft:
http://www.enginehistory.org/Features/Tanks/Chrysler_23.jpg

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-22 05:44:46 and read 17962 times.

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 80):
Yup, that's the monster. Five inline 6's joined with a single driveshaft:

Good grief Charlie Brown - how long did that thing run before something awful happened?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: EssentialPowr
Posted 2006-11-22 06:06:42 and read 17958 times.

Quoting JetMech (Reply 26):
What an awesome looking piece of machinery. It looks like it could almost blow the rails away as well! That beast would most certainly make some noise!

One of the reasons they were canned, in addition to noise, is that when stopped under highway overpasses, the exhaust temp "desolidified" ashphalt overlays...

Quoting KBFIspotter (Reply 30):

I remember reading somewhere that the LM2500's are not for propulsion, but are to provide back up power for the ship if demand exceeds the primary generators, or if the primarys fail.

edit (don't know how I screwed this up, below is my input...Essentialpowr...:

The LM2500 is used as a primary power plant for DDGs (Burke and Sprucan), Perry class frigates, Aegis class destroyers, and Bob Hope class A somethings... As far as the USN goes. Allison build the prime mover (gas turbine) for the electric plant of the DDGs and cruisers, and the pm for the FFGs is a Stewart and Stevenson modified 16V149TI...



[quote=N231YE,reply=69]Wasn't EMD's 710 engine the most popular?

Isn't it still? For the SD70AC and DC??

Quoting N231YE (Reply 74):
You know when you're a railroad guy when you can tell the sound difference between EMD's 2-stoke diesels to GE's 4-stroke diesels.

That rocks... I was have been on railserve a lot lately... GEs website on the EVO is pretty cool...

[Edited 2006-11-22 06:09:49]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-11-22 14:18:38 and read 17875 times.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 81):
Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 80):
Yup, that's the monster. Five inline 6's joined with a single driveshaft:

Good grief Charlie Brown - how long did that thing run before something awful happened?

Indeed. German tank and tank killer guns were pretty good. Big grin

Seriously though, until a few decades ago tracked military vehicles had abysmal reliability compared to anything in the civilian world. When I did my service, the Swedish Army was just about to phase out its Merlin powered Centurions. Basically we're talking 1940s technology. Those things broke down constantly and the tank crews did more service than ops. After doing a full service and storing them one week over Christmas, only about half of them started. Being a British design, they were of course equipped with a Lucas electrical system. Lucas being well known as "the man who invented darkness".

As an aside, changing the fanbelt involved lying across the gearbox upside down at a 45 degree angle with your feet hooked over the hatch. Wheeee.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-22 14:34:13 and read 17866 times.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 83):
Indeed. German tank and tank killer guns were pretty good. Big grin

The dreaded Ronsons. Does anyone know if the diesel Shermans were any better when hit?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Tod
Posted 2006-11-22 16:07:43 and read 17852 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 52):
In fact, the unlimited hydroplane series that used to be run had biggish boats all running RR Merlins. I think they tried Griffins as well back in the 60's

The only boat that ran the Griffin seriously was an early 80's version of the Miss Budweiser designed by Ron Jones. (see photo in post 73).
The owner of the boat, Bernie Little bought every one of the Griffins he could find, dominating the unlimited class and driving everyone forward with the L-55 development.

One of the hydroplane unique features used on the Allisons included turbocharging. Last time I checked, Ed Cooper owned an fairly modern unlimited hull configured that way.

Tod

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Tod
Posted 2006-11-22 17:00:57 and read 17838 times.

Quoting Ryan h (Reply 51):
I think the boat Donald Campbell died in was powered by a jet engine.

Traveling about 300 mph in 1967.

The current record is 317. It has not increased to anywhere it's potential because none of the top notch hydroplane designers want to be involved due to a strong distaste for attending those sorts of funerals.
(I've attended my share of hydroplane related funerals and agree wholeheartedly)

Tod

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-22 17:37:17 and read 17833 times.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 81):
Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 80):
Yup, that's the monster. Five inline 6's joined with a single driveshaft:

Good grief Charlie Brown - how long did that thing run before something awful happened?

There's an interesting book called "The Business of Tanks" by George McLeod Ross. He was a member of the British purchasing commission and he has many interesting observations about what sort of powerplant you need to run a tank. In this case the Brits were given all the A57 powered Shermans and had to deal with the reliability aspects of it. Once the engines had been product improved with stellite valves and seats they became very reliable and long lived, while using a lot less oil and fuel than the air cooled versions.

http://www.amazon.com/Business-Tanks...03-3772997-2219001?ie=UTF8&s=books

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 83):
ndeed. German tank and tank killer guns were pretty good.

But not nearly in adequate quantities, and in the service of slavery, racism, genocide and madness as well...I think Churchill referred to 'the lights of perverted science' in this connection.

When the Sherman was upgunned with the 17 pounder or later marks of the 76mm gun it could punch holes in anything Germany had in its arsenal except maybe the King Tiger-if it could get close enough, and if there were any that managed to survive and bugger off from the Eastern Front.


The dreaded Ronsons. Does anyone know if the diesel Shermans were any better when hit?[/quote]

Probably somewhat better than the ones that ran on mogas but still marginal in the armor department.

We should have reverse engineered the T34.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-22 19:22:27 and read 17815 times.

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 82):
Isn't it still? For the SD70AC and DC??

The EMD 710 is the prime mover for the SD70/SD75/SD80 (the SD-80 uses the 20 cylinder version of it Big grin  bigthumbsup  ) series locomotives...however, since the railroad industry in North America is so consolidated now, they are being built in far fewer numbers than they used to be...the EMD 567 series remains the most prolific series of EMD diesel engines ever built. GE has been the dominant locomotive builder since 1994 or so, also...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-22 19:36:01 and read 17804 times.

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 82):
That rocks... I was have been on railserve a lot lately... GEs website on the EVO is pretty cool...

It is very interesting, and what an interesting company...everything from GE90-115s, to 60W light bulbs, medical equipment and, locomotives.

I have talked alot about locomotives on this thread...but I should at least contribute something to the aviation theme (Airliners.net  biggrin  )

There is a version of the Wright R-1820 used on the T-1 tank, the same base-engine used on the B-17.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: EssentialPowr
Posted 2006-11-22 20:49:18 and read 17759 times.

"American Iron" this month has a chopper powered by a radial built in AUS... hey Jetmech, know the company??

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-11-22 20:57:04 and read 17748 times.

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 90):
"American Iron" this month has a chopper powered by a radial built in AUS... hey Jetmech, know the company??

I do! But if this was a question geared towards JetMech, then I won't answer it  biggrin 

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-22 21:01:13 and read 17762 times.




Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 90):
"American Iron" this month has a chopper powered by a radial built in AUS... hey Jetmech, know the company??

I've seen two. The first is built by JRL cycles:






The other is allegedly built by Jesse James:








I believe both of those engines are built by Rotec in Australia. Man, I'd hate to bottom that engine out on a pothole...



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-11-22 21:14:54 and read 17743 times.

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 90):
American Iron" this month has a chopper powered by a radial

Makes sense...the Harley engine is designed like a two-cylinder radial, there is only one journal on the crankshaft. That's also the reason for the engines lopping "potato-potato" idle  Wink

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 92):
I've seen two.

Wonder if the engine manufacturer recommends walking the bike in gear before starting to prevent hydraulic lock in the bottom cylinders  Wink You can't exactly walk the prop here...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BAe146QT
Posted 2006-11-22 21:18:43 and read 17747 times.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 92):
Man, I'd hate to bottom that engine out on a pothole...

...or throw a piston like my Dad's racing MGB-GT did at full chat. That car had a big iron head in the way but shrapnel still dented the hood from inside.

The missus (non-member here but a hardcore auto mech) had a look at this thread. Verdict on post 2H4's 92? "Godawful beautiful, but nuts. No thank you."

The JRL one looks like it it's looking for an excuse to throw that belt and take your leg off.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-22 21:24:13 and read 17743 times.



I wonder what the torque must feel like on that second one. I've spent some time on a BMW R1200GS (flat twin), and cracking the throttle while sitting stationary would produce a bit of "roll"...

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 94):
...or throw a piston like my Dad's racing MGB-GT did at full chat. That car had a big iron head in the way but shrapnel still dented the hood from inside.

Reminds me of the time I was in a Wartburg (east German car) and one of the three spark plugs blew out of the head and dented the hood from the inside.  biggrin 



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: EssentialPowr
Posted 2006-11-22 21:58:29 and read 17730 times.

Thanks for the pics, 2h4. The top one was the bike I saw!

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: BAe146QT
Posted 2006-11-22 22:42:27 and read 17722 times.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 95):
and one of the three spark plugs blew out of the head and dented the hood from the inside.

People don't believe it when you tell them. But dad ended up on the hard shoulder of the M1 after his engine decided to try to leave its bay at the thick end of 140 MPH*. It apparently wasn't very dramatic, just noisy.

Ob Aviation: Anyone ever had this or something similar happen in a recip aircraft?



*Lots of years ago. I wasn't even born. Safety nuts can just go and wind their necks in cause I dont want to hear about it. Really.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Curmudgeon
Posted 2006-11-23 00:31:46 and read 17700 times.

I blew the #1 cylinder clean off a Pratt R-985 on take-off years and years ago on a Be-18. The engine still made some power before I caged it. The cylinder and push rod tubes punched clean through the cowling. It was loud, as I recall.  Wink

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-23 03:30:51 and read 17667 times.

Quoting Curmudgeon (Reply 98):
I blew the #1 cylinder clean off a Pratt R-985 on take-off years and years ago on a Be-18. The engine still made some power before I caged it. The cylinder and push rod tubes punched clean through the cowling. It was loud, as I recall.

The old man worked for Curtiss Wright during the war and one of his jobs was to do failure analysis on engines that had been removed for one reason or another. They got one from the Navy, the pilot had continued complaints about how it was running rough (an R1820-go figger) and for some reason the Navy boys didn't push it over the side as was their usual practice but sent it back to WoodRidge. A Jap 7.7mm armor piercing round had gone through the cylinder head and punched a hole in the exhaust valve, where the sodium had leaked out and the valve burned up.

Your report is not unusual with round engines.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-23 06:49:07 and read 17627 times.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 87):
We should have reverse engineered the T34.

But you would have needed to reverse engineer the tank crew too, I don't know that western troops would have survived inside a T34 even though western tanks were not all that desirable either.

The German Maus super heavy tank was planned with aero engines, one of which was the DB509 but a diesel was also tried.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-23 19:30:24 and read 17569 times.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 100):
But you would have needed to reverse engineer the tank crew too, I don't know that western troops would have survived inside a T34 even though western tanks were not all that desirable either.

Well, I don't know whether there are any ex tankers with time in type who could make that comparison....I shall put it on my list of things to figure out when I go to Aberdeen Proving Grounds next summer to tour the ordnance museum.

I have heard that the weak point of the T34 was the transmission, and crews often would carry a spare on the back deck if they were going to be out in the field for a while-believe it was 5F and 2R or 1R, dry plate clutch and so on.

The 76.2 gun that the T34 carried was, in field configuration, a favorite of the Germans who captured them. Of course the T34 became the T34/85 with a bigger bore gun. Like all Soviet hardware it was stripped down to the bare essentials, roughly finished, strong where it counted and produced in quantities that astounded and disheartened the Wehrmacht....the one thing that made the T34 aside from the gun and it's low tread loading was its V12 diesel engine, which Suzuki says was derived from Fiat aero diesel designs. Variations of that engine are still being made today. In retrospect it makes you wonder what in the hell Germany was thinking?

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: 2H4
Posted 2006-11-23 19:40:12 and read 17567 times.




Quoting Dougloid (Reply 101):
dry plate clutch

What's the advantage of a dry clutch in such an application?



2H4


Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Prebennorholm
Posted 2006-11-23 21:47:11 and read 17571 times.

This is how a Rolls-Royce Trent looks like when mounted in a ship...

http://www.rolls-royce.com/marine/pr..._gas_turbine/gas_turbines/mt30.jsp

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-23 22:18:11 and read 17546 times.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 102):
Quoting Dougloid (Reply 101):
dry plate clutch

What's the advantage of a dry clutch in such an application?



2H4

Probably cheap to make and doesn't have problems in cold weather like a wet clutch might.

Here's some in person stuff about driving a T34....it's great reading.

http://www.guns.connect.fi/gow/T34tank1.html

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Baroque
Posted 2006-11-24 14:43:36 and read 17456 times.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 101):
Well, I don't know whether there are any ex tankers with time in type who could make that comparison....I shall put it on my list of things to figure out when I go to Aberdeen Proving Grounds next summer to tour the ordnance museum.

My book on the T34 has been archived, which means it is up in the roof and I don't know where it are! And that was much better than the Wiki article, but my memory tells me that the accommodation was very cramped and you got a fearful bumping around in an interior that was not kind on skin and bones.

I have not given up hope and if I find it I will Email you on the problems with the beastie. But it appears that the diesel did indeed mean that fire was less of a problem than with most other allied tanks.

There must be a few T34s around, possibly if you visit Africa, you might even find some still in use!!

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Xv408
Posted 2006-11-24 17:44:14 and read 17429 times.

We could add Richard Noble's record-breaking cars Thrust 2 (RR Avon powered) and Thrust SSC (Reheated RR Spey powered).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrust2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrust_ssc

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KBFIspotter
Posted 2006-11-24 22:21:25 and read 17403 times.

Quoting Xv408 (Reply 106):
We could add Richard Noble's record-breaking cars Thrust 2 (RR Avon powered) and Thrust SSC (Reheated RR Spey powered).

In that case, the North American Eagle is also worthy of mention... It actually makes use of two aviation components, the fuselage of an F-104A (S/N 56-0763), and a GE J-79.


www.landspeed.com

Kris

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Francoflier
Posted 2006-11-29 23:24:42 and read 17153 times.

a Turbomeca engineer, when working on an engine in my former airline, told me the Turbomeca Bastan engines (those pointy shiny engines on that weird aircraft below) were (might still be) used coupled to electric generators to produce electricity in powerplants I can't remember where...


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Michael Baldock



The fun fact is that they were run on natural gas and non-stop at fixed RPM for long period of times, and thus could run for 10s of thousands of hours before any overhaul was needed, whereas its aviation couterpart needs an overhaul every 3000 hours. Safety issues were a factor to that too, of course.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-11-30 01:44:37 and read 17114 times.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 47):
United Technologies FT8 (JT8 derivative), GG/FT4 (JT4 derivative) FT9 (JT9 derivative) FT3 (JT3 derivative) FT4000 (PW4000 derivative)
Rolls industrial Avon, RB211, Spey, Trent. Olympus, Proteus, Tyne
GE LM6000 (CF6 derivative). LM8000 (CF6-80) LM500 (TF34) LM120 (T700 derivative)
P&W-Canada ST6 (PT6 derivative), ST18 (PW100 derivative)
Rolls/Allison 570, 501, 601 (501 derivative)
Rolls/Turbomeca RTM322
Turbomeca Astazou, Bastan, Turmo, Makila a/k/a TM1600



Quoting Francoflier (Reply 108):
a Turbomeca engineer, when working on an engine in my former airline, told me the Turbomeca Bastan engines (those pointy shiny engines on that weird aircraft below) were (might still be) used coupled to electric generators to produce electricity in powerplants I can't remember where...

See the above. There are also a large number of gas turbine engines from people like Alsthom and many other makers that are used to produce shaft horsepower for pumping duty on gas and oil pipelines, irrigation, and so on-wherever you need shaft power without worrying about a cooling system.

Although it's a little off topic, there's a long history of using waste gas to run large piston engines in places like sewage treatment plants and so on. At the Polk County Metro Waste Authority the landfill has gas wells all over it and it produces enough methane to run a 10mw power plant that has some good sized Waukesha engines.

There's an interesting document put out by the DOE that I had a few years ago which gave the name, address, and types of engines in every power plant in the US. Platts will sell the same information on a worldwide basis for about $1,000.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: WSOY
Posted 2006-12-06 15:29:05 and read 16823 times.

This was I believe one of the largest gas turbine powered passenger ships, engine data are as follows:
Gas Turbines: 2x Pratt & Whitney FT 4C-1DLF
Power output: 2x 27 500 kW
Number of revolutions: 3 800 rpm
Specific fuel consumption at 3°c: 274 kg/MWh
Fuel Consumption per day and Turbine: 180t light/heavy fuel oil mixture

www.finnjetweb.com

According to http://www.apm4parts.com/index.php?p=26 the commercial PW FT4 is derived from the aero PW JT3 / J57 .

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-12-07 01:53:21 and read 16759 times.

As a kid I watched them use J47s with afterburners and turned down stacks to dry out the runways at EWR

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: MD11Engineer
Posted 2006-12-07 11:35:46 and read 16718 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 60):
The strangest prime mover in railroad usage had to be the Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston engines: two crankshafts, and two pistons per cylinder (apparently, these diesels were originally quite successful submarine engines before being used on locomotives).

The same design was used by Junkers for some of their aero diesels in the 1920s-1930s.

Quoting Baroque (Reply 105):
There must be a few T34s around, possibly if you visit Africa, you might even find some still in use!!

A few months ago Russia was selling them for about $10,000 a piece, together with lots of other W2 hardware. Apparently the Russian government followed the maxime of an obsolete tank is better than no tank at all and kept thousands of T-34 in storage as reserves in case of war, but last year decided to sell them, together with e.g. PPsH-41 and PPH-43 submachine guns, Mosin-Nagant rifles for foreign currency.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 109):
Although it's a little off topic, there's a long history of using waste gas to run large piston engines in places like sewage treatment plants and so on.

Steel mills usually use the excess gas generated by the blast furnaces (mostly CO) to heat the fresh air blown into the furnaces and to power huge piston engined blowers for the air, single cylinder engines with a huge (5 meters diameter) flywheel and a piston with 0.5 - 1.0 meters diameter.

Jan

BTW, the Germans called the Sherman tank, if used by the British, the "Tommy cooker" due to the fact that it caught fire very easily. In it's standard version with the 76 mm gun it was undergunned and stood no chance in destroying a Panther or a Tiger unless it managed to sneak up their lesser armoured rear side, while the German 88mm guns could pick up a Sherman at distances of more than a kilometer. The British Sherman Firefly equalised the situation a little, because the British got rid of the underpowered 76mm gun and replaced it with a quite powerfull 17Pdr antitank gun, but there were never enough fireflies around, usually a tank troop had 3 normal Shermans and one Firefly.

Jan

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Dougloid
Posted 2006-12-07 16:30:28 and read 16693 times.

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 112):
BTW, the Germans called the Sherman tank, if used by the British, the "Tommy cooker" due to the fact that it caught fire very easily. In it's standard version with the 76 mm gun it was undergunned and stood no chance in destroying a Panther or a Tiger unless it managed to sneak up their lesser armoured rear side, while the German 88mm guns could pick up a Sherman at distances of more than a kilometer. The British Sherman Firefly equalised the situation a little, because the British got rid of the underpowered 76mm gun and replaced it with a quite powerfull 17Pdr antitank gun, but there were never enough fireflies around, usually a tank troop had 3 normal Shermans and one Firefly.

As a practical matter, the M3 Grant and M4 Sherman were prewar medium (light-heavy?) tank designs that were considerably lighter than anything that the Germans put in the field later on in the day. A more appropriate comparison is the PzKpfw IV.

The only German tank that had the 88mm gun was the Tiger, which was overweight, underpowered, deficient in range, unreliable, as prone to fire as anything else being a gasoline powered machine, and overweight/oversize for many of the bridges it had to be carried over, because the range was so poor that it couldn't be driven to the battlefield.

Kind of reminds me of a fighter with a knockout punch but no ability to stick and move.

The Panther was rushed into production in response to the Soviet T34. A fine example of crisis engineering. Plagued by mechanical breakdowns in the beginning, track unsuited to heavy weather and snow/ice, track maintenance difficult, but it ultimately became a good fighting vehicle, never in sufficient numbers.

In the event, German tanks were mostly occupied on the eastern front. Conspicuous by their absence in anything approaching sufficient numbers in the west, methinks. I mean, I guess they were good if you could find one.

PzKpfw IV
engine:300 hp Maybach V12 petrol
guns: 75mm KwK L/24, 2x 7.92mm MG34
speed: 25mph road, 12.5 mph off road
weight: 19,700 kg
range: 125 miles
production: about 8,000 total.

Tiger
engine: 700 hp Maybach V12 petrol
guns: 88mm KwK36, 2x 7.92mm MG34
speed: road 24mph, off road 12 mph
weight: 55,000 kg
range: 62 miles
taken out of production in 1944 because of mobility and range, 1,300 made

Tiger II
engine: 700 hp Maybach V12 petrol
guns: 88mm KwK 43 L/71, 2x 7.92mm MG34
speed: road 24 mph, off road 11 mph
weight: 69,400 kg
range: 68 miles
485 built

M4 Sherman (various marks)
engine(s): 500 hp Ford GAA; Chrysler A57 multibank; Continental radial; Guiberson diesel radial; GMC diesel.
gun(s): 75mm M3; 76mm; 17 pdr; 2x.30 cal MG, 1x .50 cal MG
speed: 26 mph
weight: 31,554 kg
range: 100 miles
49,230 built


Panther
engine: Maybach 700 hp V12 petrol
guns: 75 mm KwK 42 L/70, 2x 7.92mm MG34
speed: road 29 mph, off road 15 mph
weight: 44,800 kg
range 110 miles
@ 5,000 built

T34
engine: V2-34 500 hp diesel
guns: 76mm; 85 mm, 2x7.62mm mg
speed: 31 mph
weight: 32,000 kg
range: 186 mi
production: 30,000 ++

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Tod
Posted 2006-12-07 19:01:52 and read 16684 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 60):
The strangest prime mover in railroad usage had to be the Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston engines: two crankshafts, and two pistons per cylinder (apparently, these diesels were originally quite successful submarine engines before being used on locomotives).

As a kid, I worked at a machine shop that was developing a three cylinder, six piston version of this for an Indy car application. It ran, but was never raced.

Tod

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-12-07 22:46:49 and read 16647 times.

Quoting Tod (Reply 114):
As a kid, I worked at a machine shop that was developing a three cylinder, six piston version of this for an Indy car application. It ran, but was never raced.

Ok explain to me how a three cylinder engine can have six pistons. I have given it some thought but clearly I don't get it.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-12-07 22:55:21 and read 16644 times.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 115):
Ok explain to me how a three cylinder engine can have six pistons. I have given it some thought but clearly I don't get it.

There are engines out there, that had two pistons per cylinder, each opposing each other. I will try to find some photos off of the internet with examples of this.

[Edited 2006-12-07 23:02:49]

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-12-07 23:01:53 and read 16649 times.

I told you I'd find an example.

An example includes Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston diesel engines, as found on the submarine USS Pampanito.

Here is a diagram/schemetic:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opposed_piston_engine

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: KELPkid
Posted 2006-12-08 02:35:59 and read 16601 times.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 117):
I told you I'd find an example.

An example includes Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston diesel engines, as found on the submarine USS Pampanito.

Also found on the Faribanks Morse H24-66 "Trainmaster" locomotive, H16-66, and H16-44 locomotives  Wink BTW, if anyone is curious, opposed piston diesels are, by nature, two stroke diesels...

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: N231YE
Posted 2006-12-08 02:49:15 and read 16595 times.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 118):
Also found on the Faribanks Morse H24-66 "Trainmaster" locomotive, H16-66, and H16-44 locomotives

Gotta put the railroad twist to it, for railroad guys like you and I!  smile 

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 118):
BTW, if anyone is curious, opposed piston diesels are, by nature, two stroke diesels...

Naaa, let's somehow put poppet-valves in that thing and see if it becomes a four-stroke  wink 

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2006-12-08 03:55:44 and read 16588 times.

You certainly learn something new every day here in tech_ops. Wow. Opposed pistons. Had no idea.

Topic: RE: Other Uses Of Airplane Engines?
Username: Wrldwndrer
Posted 2006-12-08 07:45:07 and read 16560 times.

Check out Mark Nye's website:

http://www.gas-turbines.com/projects/index.html

He's built a snow melter, 2 jet boats, and bunch of other neat stuff.


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