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Topic: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: airforceone
Posted 2012-04-23 18:48:49 and read 2971 times.

So lets say a pilot has his rating in the 737. When comes to series can he fly any series. For example, a Continental pilot or i guess united now. I know they have 735, 737,738 and 739. Can a single pilot be qualified to fly all those series?
Same question with the A318, 319, 320 and 321? Also if someone could explain the heavies as well like 767-200,300 and 400. Or an A343 and 346.

Is there maybe some extra training to go along with different series? Different procedures?

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: catiii
Posted 2012-04-23 18:56:51 and read 2948 times.

Quoting airforceone (Thread starter):
Can a single pilot be qualified to fly all those series?
Quoting airforceone (Thread starter):
Same question with the A318, 319, 320 and 321?
Quoting airforceone (Thread starter):
Also if someone could explain the heavies as well like 767-200,300 and 400.

In short yes, yes, and yes. In fact, the 757/767 type rating is common. Now the rub is, does the airline bid that as a separate category or as one category. For example, at Delta the domestic 757/767 is bid as one category, the 767ER is a separate category, and the 767-400 is a separate category.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: Acey559
Posted 2012-04-23 19:10:10 and read 2919 times.

I was talking to a CO 737 instructor a few years ago and he mentioned that all of the lower display units on the 737 NG aircraft they have are inoperative in order to have a common type rating with the older 737-500s they have. Apparently if they wanted to keep the lower DU operating it would have been more training so to cut down on that they disabled it. I thought that was pretty interesting. Also as a side note, a common type is also issued for the CRJ-200 through 1000, as well as a common type for the ERJ-135, 140 (which is technically a 135) and 145 as well as the Legacy. As with the Airbus, only differences training is required.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: Mir
Posted 2012-04-23 19:24:45 and read 2894 times.

Quoting Acey559 (Reply 2):
As with the Airbus, only differences training is required.

To expand on this, differences training is required for any major differences between various series that share a type rating. For instance, a 737 Classic pilot will need differences training before going to a 737NG. A 767-300 pilot will need differences training before flying a 767-400. In those cases, the differences are mostly avionics-related and will likely not take very long. But a 777 pilot going to the 787 will need some systems differences training in addition to avionics differences training.

-Mir

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: maxpower1954
Posted 2012-04-23 20:09:17 and read 2823 times.

Many aircraft have common type ratings. Some older types: 707/720, DC-6/7, Martin 202/404. Oddly enough, the Super DC-3 is a seperate rating from the standard DC-3.

To answer your first question, an A320 rating covers the 318 through 321. At my company you might fly the 319, 320 and 321 during a two day trip.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: United727
Posted 2012-04-23 20:28:17 and read 2800 times.

For the older A/C, the DC9 rating is also very flexible. Covers all DC-9 variants, all MD80 variants and the B717.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: Fabo
Posted 2012-04-24 04:12:58 and read 2656 times.

Quoting Acey559 (Reply 2):
I was talking to a CO 737 instructor a few years ago and he mentioned that all of the lower display units on the 737 NG aircraft they have are inoperative in order to have a common type rating with the older 737-500s they have.

Curious, do they use condensed display or side-by-side display on the upper DU then?

Quoting maxpower1954 (Reply 4):
Oddly enough, the Super DC-3 is a seperate rating from the standard DC-3.

Isnt the Super 3 totally different class, e.g. turbine class rather than piston class? Or is this not what Super DC-3 means?

Quoting airforceone (Thread starter):
Same question with the A318, 319, 320 and 321?

You could even include A330 and A340 here, although I am sceptical any airline combines longhaul with shorthaul...
I do know though that alternating A330 and A340 within one pilot pool is common.

Quoting catiii (Reply 1):
at Delta the domestic 757/767 is bid as one category, the 767ER is a separate category, and the 767-400 is a separate category.

I know that 764 has 777 avionics. Is this a matter of differencies course similar to 737NG from CL, or is it a completely different rating?

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2012-04-24 05:46:46 and read 2640 times.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 6):
Quoting airforceone (Thread starter):
Same question with the A318, 319, 320 and 321?

You could even include A330 and A340 here, although I am sceptical any airline combines longhaul with shorthaul...

I don't know if KA has one pilot pool, but they operate both 321 and 330 on the same routes, for example HKG-PVG.

The whole widebody = longhaul idea breaks down in East Asia. For example the aforementioned HKG-PVG, a 2½ hour sector, sees 747, 330 and 321, and that's just CX and KA!


In any case I'm not sure they have the 330/340 has the same type rating as 318-321.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: PGNCS
Posted 2012-04-26 11:34:57 and read 2440 times.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 6):
Quoting catiii (Reply 1):
at Delta the domestic 757/767 is bid as one category, the 767ER is a separate category, and the 767-400 is a separate category.

I know that 764 has 777 avionics. Is this a matter of differencies course similar to 737NG from CL, or is it a completely different rating?

The 764 requires a 767 rating; holders will also get a 757 rating too, of course. It does require differences training from the earlier 767, and while it might make the transition to the 777 easier, that too is another type rating.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: bjorn14
Posted 2012-04-26 13:24:43 and read 2406 times.

Same type for E70-E95 to the E although some difference training to make the leap from the E70/5 to the E90/5 IIRC.

Topic: RE: Pilot Rating And Aircraft Series.
Username: DiamondFlyer
Posted 2012-04-26 13:26:16 and read 2406 times.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 6):
Isnt the Super 3 totally different class, e.g. turbine class rather than piston class? Or is this not what Super DC-3 means?

Nope. The Super DC-3 was built back in the day, with the R2000 rather than 1800, and stretched a little over 6 feet.

-DiamondFlyer


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