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Topic: FAA Written
Username: jodoloy
Posted 2012-12-11 17:04:18 and read 2755 times.

Has anyone taken an FAA Written exam lately? I have heard that the questions are very different from what is published in study materials, and in test prep software. Is this true?

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2012-12-11 17:07:24 and read 2754 times.

Quoting jodoloy (Thread starter):

Has anyone taken an FAA Written exam lately? I have heard that the questions are very different from what is published in study materials, and in test prep software. Is this true?

I have taken the Private, Instrument and Commercial in the last few months. There are indeed "new" questions, but I wouldn't worry. If you understand the questions in a Gleim study guide and know how to use an E-6B (electronic equivalent is even better) you will pass. I'd say 95%+ of the questions are in the Gleim. There certainly were no questions that came as a surprise.

[Edited 2012-12-11 17:14:09]

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: tdscanuck
Posted 2012-12-11 18:02:45 and read 2719 times.

Quoting jodoloy (Thread starter):

Has anyone taken an FAA Written exam lately? I have heard that the questions are very different from what is published in study materials, and in test prep software. Is this true?

There was a kerfuffle some months back (reported on at length by AOPA) that the FAA had changed some of the questions without telling anybody so that they got out of whack with the study materials. AOPA was primarily reporting it in the CFI tests, as I recall, but I think the FAA said the new methodology applied to all tests.

After an unexpected spike in the failure rate as a result, the FAA backed off and I believe they're back to the prior question bank while they rethink the approach.

Tom.

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: airtran737
Posted 2012-12-11 19:07:58 and read 2699 times.

Get Sheppard Air. It is the best test prep software out there.

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: zeke
Posted 2012-12-12 00:09:51 and read 2616 times.

Quoting jodoloy (Thread starter):
I have heard that the questions are very different from what is published in study materials, and in test prep software. Is this true?

From what I understand they normally have 6 or so "new" questions in each exam, these are not marked, and you have no idea which are the new trial questions or the actual ones.

The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2012-12-12 04:16:59 and read 2562 times.

Quoting zeke (Reply 4):
The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

   If you know the subject matter, you will pass.

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Flyer732
Posted 2012-12-12 06:20:33 and read 2549 times.

Quoting airtran737 (Reply 3):
Get Sheppard Air. It is the best test prep software out there.

I'll second that. Beats every other test prep on the market hands down. Shame they don't do the private pilot level, but they do everything else. Plus they have a money back guarantee if you don't make above a 90, or find questions that were not in their prep software.

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: bond007
Posted 2012-12-12 08:25:51 and read 2523 times.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 5):
Quoting zeke (Reply 4):
The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

   If you know the subject matter, you will pass.

This of course should be the case, although it seems in the case of FAA exams there are a least a few questions with answers that you could only be 100% sure of, if you knew the question up front!


Jimbo

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Mir
Posted 2012-12-12 11:23:55 and read 2471 times.

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 2):
There was a kerfuffle some months back (reported on at length by AOPA) that the FAA had changed some of the questions without telling anybody so that they got out of whack with the study materials. AOPA was primarily reporting it in the CFI tests, as I recall, but I think the FAA said the new methodology applied to all tests.

After an unexpected spike in the failure rate as a result, the FAA backed off and I believe they're back to the prior question bank while they rethink the approach.

In other words, they're back to letting people memorize the questions beforehand.   

Quoting zeke (Reply 4):
The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

   I've never done more than a token amount of studying for an FAA written. I just skim through a book a couple of times to get a feel for how the questions are worded (which can be strange) and what the format is. And I've never failed. If you know the subject matter (which you need to anyway), you have nothing to worry about. It's your instructor's job to make sure you're prepared for the written, and IMHO that means more than just outsourcing to a prep course.

Quoting bond007 (Reply 7):
it seems in the case of FAA exams there are a least a few questions with answers that you could only be 100% sure of, if you knew the question up front!

This is true, and there are also some questions on things that you really don't need to know about anymore because technology has moved on, but you can make educated guesses on those, and even if you get them all wrong you're still likely going to pass. And since a score of 75 is just as good as a score of 95....

-Mir

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2012-12-12 15:30:26 and read 2410 times.

Quoting bond007 (Reply 7):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 5):
Quoting zeke (Reply 4):
The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

   If you know the subject matter, you will pass.

This of course should be the case, although it seems in the case of FAA exams there are a least a few questions with answers that you could only be 100% sure of, if you knew the question up front!

Quite. Some have two right answers, one of which is "more right" than the other.

Quoting Mir (Reply 8):
And since a score of 75 is just as good as a score of 95....

Yes and no. Some examiners are tougher on the oral of you barely scraped by. And some are tougher if you have a very high score since you may just have memorized. Moral of the story: get a score in the 80s. 

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: DiamondFlyer
Posted 2012-12-12 21:53:57 and read 2303 times.

Quoting airtran737 (Reply 3):
Get Sheppard Air. It is the best test prep software out there.

Especially if you need to get a test done ASAP. Sheppard Air + 10 hours and you'll be good to go.

Quoting zeke (Reply 4):
The idea is to know the subject matter, not the exam questions.

Not really. The idea is to pass the test. Use whatever means necessary to pass said test.

-DiamondFlyer

Topic: RE: FAA Written
Username: Acey559
Posted 2012-12-18 18:55:30 and read 1923 times.

Quoting DiamondFlyer (Reply 10):

Definitely. I used it for the ATP written. Studied for literally a few hours, took the test and passed no problem. Granted I think the ATP written was easier than any other written I've taken so I didn't need to study as long, but no matter what it'll save you a ton of time.


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