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Topic: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: dizzydev
Posted 2013-08-11 16:15:56 and read 3624 times.

Hello all -

I fly a good deal, and I love to share my travel experiences with my family and friends - part of which is how amazing it is that a machine can spend a minute accelerating down a runway on one side of the ocean, and ten hours later land on the other side. I was trying to put some of the facts and figures into context for a young relative, and strangely enough he went down the fuel path. I dutifully explained to him weight, volume, specific gravity, all that, and then (as kids tend to do) he asked me - 'How much fuel could this room hold.' I was stumped, because I had never thought about fuel in a volume sense, though I recall that volume varies with pressure and temperature.

Thus I pose the question to this crowd - how much volume does a given bit of fuel take, and what variables influence the translation? And, more to the point - how much volume is available on a large commercial transport (say 77E, since that was the plane in question in the conversation), and how much actually gets used vs what's 'headroom' for expansion/contraction based on those variables?

Any wisdom on this much appreciated!

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: onetogo
Posted 2013-08-11 18:01:57 and read 3558 times.

While Jet-A's weight by volume does SLIGHTLY vary as a result of the factors you have listed, it is not enough to make enough difference to actually factor in. The number is roughly ~7 pounds per gallon.. That's pretty rough just going from memory, might be like 6.75 of 7.25.

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: jetmech
Posted 2013-08-11 20:07:29 and read 3506 times.

Quoting dizzydev (Thread starter):
Thus I pose the question to this crowd - how much volume does a given bit of fuel take

In metric terms, I have seen the specific gravity (SG) of Jet A1 mostly range between 0.78 - 0.81 kg/L, though my first employer had published refuelling charts for an SG range of 0.75 - 0.85 kg/L.

Quoting dizzydev (Thread starter):
And, more to the point - how much volume is available on a large commercial transport

The 773ER and 772LR (without auxiliary tanks) both have a maximum fuel capacity of 181,280L, or 181.28 cubic metres. This is the same as a cube (room) with a linear dimension of 5.659 metres

Quoting dizzydev (Thread starter):
and how much actually gets used vs what's 'headroom' for expansion/contraction based on those variables?

I believe that there is a 2% expansion space provided on top of the 181,280L for variation in fuel volume once it is in the tanks.

Regards, JetMech

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: Max Q
Posted 2013-08-11 22:00:38 and read 3458 times.

Quoting dizzydev (Thread starter):
I fly a good deal, and I love to share my travel experiences with my family and friends - part of which is how amazing it is that a machine can spend a minute accelerating down a runway on one side of the ocean, and ten hours later land on the other side.

What a great description of something that so many take for granted.

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: LH707330
Posted 2013-08-12 10:03:14 and read 3216 times.

Many Wikipedia pages on civil airliners include fuel volume in the specs, both in gallons and liters (which can easily be converted to cubic meters).

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: LZ129
Posted 2013-08-18 03:09:29 and read 2717 times.

I just did the maths and here are some examples assuming a ceiling height of 2.5 m.

A room would have to be of this size to hold all the fuel in a full tank of fuel of the following aircraft:

Airbus A380 (320,000 l): 128 sqm
Boeing 748 (239,000 l): 95.6 sqm
Boeing 744 (217,000 l): 86.8 sqm
Boeing 77W (181,000 l): 72.4 sqm
Boeing 77E (171,000 l): 68.4 sqm
Airbus A333 (98,000 l): 39.2 sqm
Boeing 738 (26,000 l): 10.4 sqm
Airbus A320 (24,000 l): 9.6 sqm

With this handy chart you can now illustrate fuel tank sizes for your children 

[Edited 2013-08-18 03:28:33]

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2013-08-18 03:17:15 and read 2713 times.

Quoting LZ129 (Reply 5):

I just did the maths and here are some examples assuming a ceiling height of 2.5 m.

A room would have to be of this size to hold all the fuel in a full tank of fuel of the following aircraft:

Airbus A380 (320.000 l): 128 sqm
Boeing 748 (239.000 l): 95.6 sqm
Boeing 744 (217.000 l): 86.8 sqm
Boeing 77W (181.000 l): 72.4 sqm
Boeing 77E (171.000 l): 68.4 sqm
Airbus A333 (98.000 l): 39.2 sqm
Boeing 738 (26.000 l): 10.4 sqm
Airbus A320 (24.000 l): 9.6 sqm

With this handy chart you can now illustrate fuel tank sizes for your children 

You forget that his children use the US system.  Quote a ceiling height of 8 and 1/3 feet and multiply all the square meter numbers by 11 to get square feet.

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: LZ129
Posted 2013-08-18 03:24:05 and read 2710 times.

By popular demand:

Airbus A380 (320,000 l): 1408 sqf
Boeing 748 (239,000 l): 1052 sqf
Boeing 744 (217,000 l): 952 sqf
Boeing 77W (181,000 l): 797 sqf
Boeing 77E (171,000 l): 752 sqf
Airbus A333 (98,000 l): 431 sqf
Boeing 738 (26,000 l): 114 sqf
Airbus A320 (24,000 l): 106 sqf

*toomuchsparetimeonarainysunday*

[Edited 2013-08-18 03:29:04]

Topic: RE: Fuel Tank Volume
Username: Starlionblue
Posted 2013-08-18 03:29:36 and read 2710 times.

Quoting LZ129 (Reply 7):

By popular demand:

Airbus A380 (320.000 l): 1408 sqf
Boeing 748 (239.000 l): 1052 sqf
Boeing 744 (217.000 l): 952 sqf
Boeing 77W (181.000 l): 797 sqf
Boeing 77E (171.000 l): 752 sqf
Airbus A333 (98.000 l): 431 sqf
Boeing 738 (26.000 l): 114 sqf
Airbus A320 (24.000 l): 106 sqf

*toomuchsparetimeonarainysunday*

Well done! Now you just have to convert to a standard US ceiling height of 8 feet (2.43 meters).

***divesforcover***

 duck 

[Edited 2013-08-18 03:30:24]


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