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Ramp Vs Apron  
User currently offlineGeoffm From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 2111 posts, RR: 6
Posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 5571 times:

In the US it appears that the mass of concrete that planes sit on while at the gate is called the "ramp". In the UK we call it an "apron".

Anybody know the origin of these words? "Ramp" usually signifies a slope, or a freeway slip road. An "apron" is usually something you wear!

Geoff M.

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5504 times:

There's also the pan or the line.

Any other names?


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5475 times:

"The Bay"
regds
HAWK



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17039 posts, RR: 66
Reply 3, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5338 times:

The "tarmac".
.
.
.
.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineRNOcommctr From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 827 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5289 times:

I have never heard anyone in the airport business in the U.S. refer to the ramp/apron as "tarmac", although many in the news media use that term. Is "tarmac" a U.K. thing?


I'm sorry, ma'am, I don't work for the airline.
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 5, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5269 times:

I agree with you RNOcommctr the media loves to use jargon that they think insiders use.

The media is also the only place I ever hear "black boxes" - insiders call them the CVR or FDR.

The media stuck U-2 pilot Frank (Francis Gary) Powers and assassin Lee (Harvey) Oswald with their middle names for eternity. Neither of them used those names.

And of course, who could ever forget (all one word) "WinnieMandelawifeofjailedSouthAfricanactivistNelsonMandela?" every time her name came up in the news.

Then of course you have the flight attendants who muddy the issue with the passengers by telling them "we are still on an active runway" when we are actually on a taxiway or ramp.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14026 posts, RR: 62
Reply 6, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5233 times:

Tarmac derives from MacAdam, the Scottish civil engineer who invented the method of mixing tar (and later asphalt) with rocks and gravel to build roads.

Jan


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17039 posts, RR: 66
Reply 7, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5220 times:

Another classic, from the Swedish press, is "Indonesiatheworld'smostpopulousmuslimnation"...

"Tarmac" is a UK thing yes.




"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2438 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5191 times:

Then there is aeroplane vs airplane and tyre vs tire.


Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5150 times:

final (US) vs. finals (Euro.)

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17039 posts, RR: 66
Reply 10, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5139 times:

Ass vs Arse
Aluminum vs Aluminium
Herbs (silent h) vs herbs
Cellphone vs mobile phone
Text messaging vs texting
Crap! vs Bollocks!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy



final (US) vs. finals (Euro.)

You mean UK...



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
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