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Chocks On Nose Wheel  
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 5168 times:


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Isn't chocks on NLG compulsory in Germany.I Understand the Main Wheels are chocked but Shouldn't the Nose Wheel be chocked too.
If Im no mistaken the Nose wheel chocks are used for the Main Wheels.
Parking for a B737 should be more Aft.
regds
MEL


Think of the brighter side!
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePosti From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 106 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 5061 times:

If the aircraft is parked on a flat surface, only 1 of the mains really needs to be chocked. I worked at a big FBO this summer with a lot of private jets and the only time we chocked all three wheels was when a big storm was coming in. I don't know of any regulations regarding chocking in the USA or Europe, so I can't help you there, but I assure you that 737 isn't going anywhere until those chocks are removed.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4884 times:

Out here for a long halt as above,Minimum Nose gear & any One Main Gear is required to be chocked hence the Question.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVonRichtofen From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 4627 posts, RR: 36
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4871 times:

Chocking policies are airline specific, not airport specific.


Kris



Word
User currently offlineGREASESPOT From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3078 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 4838 times:

Actually when our 727 was operated for DHL in Europe A lot that is airline specific in North America Is airport specific over there. So it is not un heard of to have a rule on chocking.

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineN405MX From Mexico, joined May 2004, 1378 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4690 times:

Normally in Mexico the main gear and the nose gear got chocks, only when the plane stays all night we chock all the wheels


Life is what happens when you have other plans.....
User currently offlineEZYAirbus From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 2460 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4683 times:

At easyJet we only chock the nosewheel, but in windy conditions we sometimes chock the main wheels too!

Glenn



http://www.glenneldridgeaviation.com
User currently offlineFinnWings From Finland, joined Oct 2003, 640 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4687 times:

The normal practice in Helsinki is chock the main wheels and nosewheel if the aircraft is parked on the remote stand. When those are parked at the gate usually only main wheels are chocked. However, some airlines have their own practices. For example, DHL and UPS demand that every tyre will be chocked (in case of B757 this means 12 chocks!).

Best Regards,
FinnWings


User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4669 times:

In my mind it depends on aircraft type, what the manual says so to say.
For example the Lockheed Constellation manual says NOT to chock the nose wheel because it would damage the strut.
I suppose this applies to every type, just check your manual chapter "ground handling" and you will find the answer.



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4510 times:

The picture could have been taken just before the chocks were placed, or just after they were removed. When no chocks are in place the parking brake should remain set.

Building codes applicable in most communities where you will find airports usually require the ground to slope away from buildings so that water will not pool up against them. This can produce a slight slope away from the terminal building. Again, that is community regulations, not FARs.

Also, as has been stated, chocking is in accordance with the airline's procedures.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4191 posts, RR: 37
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4485 times:

If you'll notice, both the mains are chocked...


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineWhiskeyflyer From Ireland, joined May 2002, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 4370 times:

our policy on chocks is to only remove the ones you find that do not have a logo on them and put them in the ramp truck. We hate it when they punch holes to form a name

(fairs, fair our chocks go missing too, we punch holes but they still walk or should that be bounce they being rubber and all)


User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4352 times:

Hi Hawk21, Buzz here. If our aircraft (UAL) are at the gate, the parking brake is set and NLG chocks are all that's needed. When we park away from the terminal we chock the mains.

At UAL we have set the parking brake as long as i remember with no ill effects. I wonder why other operators release the brakes when they park?

Many years ago at SFO Service Center,on the old wash rack we'd park a 747 overnight. They seem to be light on the nose - at least when empty. One gusty night when the winds were crosswind to the old wash rack spot, the 747 squirmed over 5 or 6 feet, the NLG had been put on the centerline at the beginning of the night. By sunrise the NLG tires were 5 or 6 feet over as that Classic Lump had tried to weather-vane into the wind.
I'm a beliver in chocking the MLG...
g'day
Buzz Fuselsausage: Line Mechanic by night, DC-3 Crew Chief by choice, taildragger pilot for fun.


User currently offline747NUT From Australia, joined Sep 2004, 78 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4349 times:

"I wonder why other operators release the brakes when they park? "

I know continental have a park brake light at the external power panel (737NG) that operates even if all power is switched off, even the battery.
I believe they use the barless tugs and they don't use a brake man, so the tug can just come along and move the aircraft without using someone to operate the brakes.
The only thing they do is check the light and move it .



If it's not broken, don't fix it !
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 4336 times:

Parking brake is routinely left OFF whenever possible for a good reason. The brakes will cool better if they are not all clamped together (as in SET) If the brakes were very hot, leaving them to cool with the parking brake ON may warp the rotors.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 4327 times:

Parking Brakes if set [B737] & power removed for halts more than 8 hrs require repressurizing & setting brakes as Hydraulic pressure will have leaked out by then.
Out here for long halts Both Main & Nose Gear wheels are chocked.
Why were the Main wheels chocked by Nose wheel chocks.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineN867BX From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 339 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 4222 times:

Chocking only the nose gear is a waste on time. Such a small percentage of the aircraft weight is carried by it. Would not take much for the plane to run right over it.

User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4215 times:

N867BX is right on the money. A stiff headwind can be enough to make an airliner jump nose wheel chocks with the small amount of weight that is on the NLG. Chock both mains if you want to be sure that the aircraft will go nowhere.

Regards,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 4013 times:

Out here Max Chocking of Two of the Four Main wheels & Both Nose Wheels is the SOP.I've never seen 10 chocks used on a B737.
Although We do see a few Foreign operators on charters do things differently.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineWbmech From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3976 times:

High winds (30 to 40 mph) can and will turn a 737 around if not properly chocked and brakes applied. It just happened a week ago a EWR. A 737 got twisted around almost 180 degrees so that its tail was facing the terminal and nose facing out towards the taxiway. I don't have the details, but I know that this isn't the first time it happened. By the way, the aircraft got lucky and sustained minimal wingtip and stabilizer tip damage.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3971 times:

but I know that this isn't the first time it happened.
Your Right this has happened many times before.Unless the Steering Metering valve is locked,or Main Gear chocked.The B737 when unpressurized can cause the Nose wheel to turn with strong winds.Something similiar happed at Delhi a few yrs back.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3931 times:

As far as general aviation operations go, I've seen both methods of chocking. We've flown a Cessna 414 for years and generally do not chock the mains except when parking overnight. If high winds are forecast, the airplane usually gets tied down using the three tiedown points. Due to the aircraft design (low wing to ground clearance) there really is no safe way to chock the main gears immediately after engine shutdown due to the location of the engine exhaust piping so the plane usually gets a nosewheel chock and tied down on the two engine nacelle points instead. There are a few other GA aircraft that have similar design concerns.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 22, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 3893 times:

There are chocks available that chock the Two nose wheels [Longer width] which are very effective,compared to the Single wheel ones use on the MLG.
Im refering to the ones used on B737.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
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