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De-Icing  
User currently offlineNjdevilsin03 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 3057 times:

What are the average conditions for a plane to be de-iced in, mid 20s? Basically whats it have to be to be de-iced?


717, 727, 731, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 752, 753, 762, 763, 777, DC9, MD80, DC10, L1011, ERJ, CRJ, ATR, DH8, A300,
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAvianceGirlUK From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 3026 times:

'Basically whats it have to be to be de-iced?'

Erm.. Ice on the wings i guess... No sarcastic comment intended but kinda set yourself up for this answer...


User currently offlineTnsaf From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 123 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 2985 times:

Ice, frost, snow accumulation on the wings and other flying surfaces. As well accumulations of snow etc. from the fuselage.




700 hours and counting...
User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 2973 times:

a deicing event is declared at any time where the tempurature is low enough that an airplane sitting at the gate would accumulate ice. if the temp is -30C but there is no precip whatsoever you don't need to deice.


"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 2933 times:

>>>a deicing event is declared at any time where the tempurature is low enough that an airplane sitting at the gate would accumulate ice. if the temp is -30C but there is no precip whatsoever you don't need to deice.

That may well be, but there are plenty of times when it's cold outside and there's no precip falling at the airport, but the aircraft has picked up (and still has) ice from the descent, primarily on the leading edges of the vertical and horizontal stabilizers...

As such, a de-icing event might be better described as being any time one has to remove any frozen precip from the aircraft, no matter when it attached itself to the airframe...


User currently offlineNjdevilsin03 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 2901 times:

SAy the temp is in the low 20s with light snow would that be considered enough for de icing?


717, 727, 731, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 752, 753, 762, 763, 777, DC9, MD80, DC10, L1011, ERJ, CRJ, ATR, DH8, A300,
User currently offlineCYLW From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 438 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 2875 times:

Whenever frost, snow or ice is ADHERING to a CRITICAL surface.
Pretty simple eh?


User currently offlineNjdevilsin03 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 2869 times:

I've never been on a plane that's deiced before and i wanna see what it's like. I flew out of Boston once it was in the mid 20s but clear and we were de iced. But I am flying in and out of Philly this coming weekend and on monday it is showing cold windy snow and in the 20s and was thinking maybe Ill get to experience it then.


717, 727, 731, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 752, 753, 762, 763, 777, DC9, MD80, DC10, L1011, ERJ, CRJ, ATR, DH8, A300,
User currently offlineAirStatDFW From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 378 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 2871 times:

It doesn't have to be in the 20's either I have seen some planes de-ice when it has been in the 40's. It all depends if there is ice, frost, etc on the surface of the aircraft.

AirStatDFW


User currently offlineNjdevilsin03 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 2864 times:

thanks for all the info guys!


717, 727, 731, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 752, 753, 762, 763, 777, DC9, MD80, DC10, L1011, ERJ, CRJ, ATR, DH8, A300,
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2856 times:

Critical Flight control surfaces,Wings,Leading Edges.Basicaly anything that could alter the Lift & control surfaces movement by being covered with ice or frozen.
What about Engine rotors.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 2845 times:

I've seen aircraft de-iced in the high 40s (F). The critical component is really visible precip. A cold soaked fuel tank can lower the temperature of the wing substaintially, when precip comes in contact with that wing it will freeze. Now, I'm not saying a rainstorm, I'm talking fog, mist, light drizzle. Lower levels of precip. (though with high humidity) with declining temeratures equals need for de/anti-ice.

User currently offlineSparkyN501 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 52 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (10 years 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2800 times:

Most all of the US carriers have a "clean aircraft" concept. This means no ice/frost/snow on any surface of the plane. Of course the control surfaces are most critical, however a accumulation of snow or ice on the fuselage will also increase the weight and flying characteristics of the plane. That is why you will see the wings, tail, and fuselage deiced when it is snowing.

Deicing could happen at almost any time when the temperature is below 45F. Frost can form on wings, upper tails, and over fuel tanks at a relatively high temperature. There are certain exceptions for frost. An example would be frost that is above the windows, and only on the fuselage. Most carriers allow this without deicing. As soon as there is any frost on the wings, or tail, the plane will be deiced. Frost will form on a plane with no visible moisture in the air.

Engine inlets are inspected by either the crew or mechanics, and if there is ice build up in the fan blades, (or propellers) ususally maintenance is responsible for removing it prior to departure.

Those guys in the deice trucks freezing their butts off do a great job making sure that every time a plane leaves, it is ready for a safe flight.




Arguing with a pilot is like mudwrestling a pig. After awhile you begin to think the pig likes it.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (10 years 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2764 times:

What are the Levels of Deicing Fluids available & what determines its use.
Time,Amount of snow,Temperature.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineA340600 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2003, 4106 posts, RR: 51
Reply 14, posted (9 years 12 months 8 hours ago) and read 2672 times:

Hey,

Funny de-icing story. In Salzburg we were the biggest a/c on te ground (763ER) for our short flight bk to LGW. We had to have 2 de-icers, whilst the other a/c (757's) only required one.

Anyway they only sent one out, thinking it could manage. It spent time de-icing the left wing, then moved onto the right. once it had finished the right wing the left one had iced up again! Then they did the left and right one had iced. EVENTUALLY we got another de-icer in.

Anyway I was sat in Y for 2 hours on ground and it hurt. Let alone having to go trans in that thing!

Sam

[Edited 2004-12-27 00:47:51]


Despite the name I am a Boeing man through and through!
User currently offlineFinnWings From Finland, joined Oct 2003, 640 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2621 times:

Deicing could happen at almost any time when the temperature is below 45F. Frost can form on wings, upper tails, and over fuel tanks at a relatively high temperature.

This is definitely true. De-icing might be needed in any temperature even above 45F. I have once witnessed de-icing at HKG when temperature was 70F! I believe the aircraft had experienced severe icing during descent and the ice didn't melt completely during turnaround.

Best Regards,
FinnWings


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17173 posts, RR: 66
Reply 16, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2624 times:

It doesn't have to be in the 20's either I have seen some planes de-ice when it has been in the 40's. It all depends if there is ice, frost, etc on the surface of the aircraft.


Very true. On Gotland (island outside Sweden) they brought this guy in with frostbite on the hottest day of the year. His glider had been caught in a thunderstorm. So it can be warm on the ground and very cold up there.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
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