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What Is The Thing Attached To The Front Gear?  
User currently offlineErj145lr From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 431 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 5032 times:


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Photo © Michael Arcellana




--what is that black thing attached to the front gear of this 717, do they all have it?

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSPREE34 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2248 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 5011 times:

Spray deflector. Keeps water from spraying out and up into the engines. So I was told.


I don't understand everything I don't know about this.
User currently offlineMtnmanmakalu From Ireland, joined Nov 2004, 515 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4990 times:

SPREE34-
You are right-
It also keeps snow and slush and ice, along with water from going into the engines....

mtnman



I do, I don't, whatever.......
User currently offlineErj145lr From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 431 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4975 times:

thats all the way on the front nose gear how would it keep snow, water etc, from getting in the engines..all the way on the back of the plae???

User currently offlineMtnmanmakalu From Ireland, joined Nov 2004, 515 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4948 times:

thats all the way on the front nose gear how would it keep snow, water etc, from getting in the engines..all the way on the back of the plae???

I suggest you take an Aerospace class (which I have) or something along those lines and maybe you can see how it would.
You evidently don't live in a "snow belt" or you would know what slush spray is like...



I do, I don't, whatever.......
User currently offlineFlybyguy From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 1801 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4941 times:

It protects the belly from being damaged by small runway debris like pebbles etc. The DC-9/717 type aircraft are built to sit very low to the ground so such a device is necessary to mitigate any potential damage.


"Are you a pretender... or a thoroughbred?!" - Professor Matt Miller
User currently offlineErj145lr From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 431 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4902 times:

ok, thanks for a NICE answer Flybyguy. mmmhhmmm mtnmanmakalu

User currently offlineAv8trxx From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 657 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4850 times:

Yes, it was a nice post wasn't it? According to the Boeing site, the optional deflectors on the 717, MD80 & MD90 are combination spray and FOD deflectors. Water spray off the nosewheel does get back up to the tail mounted engines even though one might not think it would. Instead of an arrogant reply like #4, a picture is worth a thousand words and will help one understand better. The pix on this link are some great illustrations, the 727 at bottom in peticular-
http://www.airdisaster.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60937&page=2&pp=10


User currently offlineJeffLAS From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 161 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4697 times:


Remember Nordair? All of their 737's had the deflector thing on the front gear as well. They very much earned their usefulness on some of the gravel runways in northern Canada. Pacific Western Airlines had them on their 737's for airports such as Fort McMurray in the early 70's. (Alberta, Canada, in case you are wondering where it is, home to 1.4 trillion barrels of oil.) (YES, Trillion) : Big thumbs up



" Jazz A-380, you have 2,100 feet from the intersection......Cleared for Take-off"
User currently offlineFlyabunch From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 517 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4669 times:

I also recall seeing Alaska 737-200's at SEA with a rod sticking out in front of the bottom of the engine nacelle. I was told that it was positioned to prevent rocks from being sucked into the engine on gravel airstrips. When you look at the moisture vortexes on the link in reply 7 it sure makes sense.

Mike


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29799 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4628 times:

Spray guard.

Micky-D thought it would be a cheaper solution to keep water spray out of the engines then what Boeing did on the 727, which was used Chined tires on the NLG.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineLVZXV From Gabon, joined Mar 2004, 2041 posts, RR: 36
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4604 times:

thats all the way on the front nose gear how would it keep snow, water etc, from getting in the engines..all the way on the back of the plae???


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Photo © JMG - BAIRES Aviation Photography



The main gear are also fitted with deflectors to guard against FOD. Ironically, the aircraft in the second picture sustained considerable damage last February when one of its left main-wheels separated on take-off, damaging a flap and the #1 engine (not sure if this occurred in the actual incident or during the emergency landing at EZE when the remaining tyre on that assembly blew-out).


MyAviation.net photo:
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Photo © Harro Ranter



Regards,

ZXV




How do you say "12 months" in Estonian?
User currently offlineMeister808 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 973 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4510 times:

From those Aerolineas Argentinas pictures, are there deflectors on the main landing gear as well?

-Meister



Twin Cessna 812 Victor, Minneapolis Center, we observe your operation in the immediate vicinity of extreme precipitation
User currently offlineStirling From Italy, joined Jun 2004, 3943 posts, RR: 21
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 4416 times:

I thought the rod coming out from under the engine nacelles was actually a nozzle that shot high pressure bleed air down and out, in front of the engine, spraying any loose objex out of the way, as a protection from FOD (Foreign Object Damage).

I always wondered how that could over-power the intake forces?



Delete this User
User currently offline747NUT From Australia, joined Sep 2004, 78 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 4257 times:

I always wondered how that could over-power the intake forces?

It does not over-power the forces as such, it just prevents the formation of a vortex, or mini tornado, for lack of a better word. Which will pick up FOD from the ground.

Hope that helps



If it's not broken, don't fix it !
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4008 times:

Would the correct term be 'Gravel Deflector'
On the B737 it was called that,& the Tube projecting below the Engine was the Vortex Dissapator.I guess the Name explains it all.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSATL382G From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3954 times:

I've got a video of Boeings high speed taxi water ingestion test for the 727.
Video was shot from the some height at the end of the runway and facing the nose. Difference between chined & non-chined tires was dramatic. The chine really does the job....


User currently offlineLVZXV From Gabon, joined Mar 2004, 2041 posts, RR: 36
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3882 times:

Meister:

From those Aerolineas Argentinas pictures, are there deflectors on the main landing gear as well?

Indeed there are.  Smile

Regards,

ZXV




How do you say "12 months" in Estonian?
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 18, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3754 times:

Couple of notes:

Earlier (shorter) DC-9 aircraft did use chined tires on the nosewheel.

The spray deflector on the MD-80 nose gear required a new towbar because it was about an inch wider. I believe the newer towbars could also handle the earlier nines.

* * *


Erj145er how it gets all the way back to the engines is really pretty clear if you think in terms of time rather than distance. The nosewheel throws up a roostertail of water or slush, throwing out to the sides, maybe 15 or 20 feet in the air - and it moves on. It takes the water a second or so to fly up that high and fall back to the runway, but during that second or so, the engines have arrived on the scene. By 88 knots, the MD-80 is traveling its own length each second and it is accelerating.





Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29799 posts, RR: 58
Reply 19, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3723 times:

I've got a video of Boeings high speed taxi water ingestion test for the 727.
Video was shot from the some height at the end of the runway and facing the nose. Difference between chined & non-chined tires was dramatic. The chine really does the job....


I have a copy of that video too, too bad I can't put it on the web.

Makes a great impression on how much more soaked the engines get without the chines.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineMeister808 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 973 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3658 times:

What is a chine?

-Meister



Twin Cessna 812 Victor, Minneapolis Center, we observe your operation in the immediate vicinity of extreme precipitation
User currently offline242 From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 498 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3652 times:

Douglas has water ingestion video footage for the MD80 series. It may seem unlikely, but at speed without some kind of deflector/chine on the nose gear, water goes directly from the nose wheels, over the wing, and in to the engines.

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 22, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3646 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR




This shot is pretty small, but it's all I could find.


2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 23, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3640 times:

Meister808 a chine is similar to a strake or a fence. DC-9 nosewheel tires had one, a high thin rubber ridge that ran all the way around the outboard side of the tire.

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Photo © Erik Frikke
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Photo © Michael Carter


Neither of these pictures show it very well, but it can be seen here.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 24, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3576 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Here's another shot:




The tire on the left would be used for aircraft with two nosewheels, like a 727, where each tire has a single chine on the outside. The tire on the right would be used for aircraft with a single nosewheel, such as a early Citation or Learjet.


2H4



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