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High Speed Tape  
User currently offlineVidens From Argentina, joined Mar 2004, 133 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 10150 times:

I've seen high speed tape applied on aircraft for what I assume are quick fixes later addressed in more depth.
That tape must have some pretty tough glue, as it's got to resist the fast moving air over it.
My questions are:
How tough is it to remove?
Is the glue strong enough that it peels the paint off when removed?
Are there any chemicals used to make it easier to remove?
What kinds of fixes are allowed to be done with it, and which are not?

Info appreciated,
v


Travel? Why would i travel if I can watch it on TV?
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEfohdee From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 214 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 9840 times:

Never seen any tape for a temporary repair on an aircraft, not even a seat cushion. There is "100 mile an hour" tape, but it's just good tape.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 9816 times:

We've used High speed tape to hold down Panels that are not Streamlined temporarily until repairs are carried out.
Its Important that the Area near the LE of the Tape is well applied to prevent peeling.
A Good Paint job will not peel.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13792 posts, RR: 63
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 9708 times:

Speed tape is a thick aluminium foil whci is coated on one side with an adhesive.

Jan


User currently offlineDl757Md From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1562 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 9673 times:

Speed tape is used for temporary repairs to areas subject to highspeed airflow.
It's used on dented leading edges which if within allowable limits are first filled with a filler(some type of sealer or putty) to regain the shape of the leading edge and then covered with speed tape to act mainly as an erosion barrier. Another place I've seen speed tape temp repairs are on composite panels. Wing leading edge closeout panels, cowls, flaps, others can be temp repaired with speed tape. Say you find a crack in a LE panel. If it is within SRM(structural repair manual) limits you can stop drill the ends of the crack, cover it with speed tape, and identify it as a temp repair. Then it is reinspected at regular intervals by pulling up the tape and determining if the crack has progressed beyond the stop drill hole. If it hasn't you put new tape on the same as before. If it has you may or may not be able to stop drill the new portion of the crack depending on the limits for that panel. If you can't you either have to replace or permanently repair the panel. If you can then you are good to go.

Dl757Md



757 Most beautiful airliner in the sky!
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 9363 times:

There's always 1,000 mile an hour tape....in the Navy, that's just a nice duct tape...seems to work allright  Laugh out loud

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineB747 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 245 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 9347 times:

I have used Speed tape to lay over a C-5 pilots windshield where it meets the window frame to keep it from whistling, lasted all ther way from South America, to the North-East USA without peeling off.

We are always using it on the C-17, where latches are broken, or where the composites are damaged. Keep in mind we only use the stuff when en-route, and have no other means. Also it can only be used where structural integrity would not be compromised.

When you have minor damage, and are en-route, it is a mechanics best friend sometimes.

Brian



At Pope, where not happy, until you're not happy!
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 9343 times:

One of the reasons speed tape is used on composite panels is to exclude mositure. Moisture in a composite (honeycomb) panel can lead to further damage due to ice formation at altitude.



User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 9286 times:

To answer your questions....

It's not too bad to remove, but the longer it has been down.. the harder it is to get up. I've never seen it pull up paint. Not really, when applied correctly it can become chemical resistant, but MEK will help remove any glue residue. I've used it to protect a windshield hump repair, temp repair over exposed composite... things like that.

Now just as an FYI.... It is pretty expensive per roll ($70-$90) and actually has pretty sharp edges... it can and has cut people.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineSpencer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1633 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 9187 times:

HAWK21M wrote, "A Good Paint job will not peel."
Actually it will, but it would depend on how badly the base surface has been prepped. A poorly prepped paint job can in fact be jet-washed away!!
Spencer.



EOS1D4, 7D, 30D, 100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS USM, 70-200/2.8 L IS2 USM, 17-40 f4 L USM, 24-105 f4 L IS USM, 85 f1.8 USM
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 9135 times:

Actually it will, but it would depend on how badly the base surface has been prepped
Wouldn't base surface preparation be a part of the paint job  Smile
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSpencer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1633 posts, RR: 17
Reply 11, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 9129 times:

I'm a painter, and to answer your question, then I'd have to say no, technically it isn't considered part of the paint job, only part of the preperation job. Painters hate to be likened to preppers, as do preppers hate to be likened to painters! (And then there's mechs and panel beaters, but we won't go there!!....grease monkeys!) But in general, out of the trade, then you are in fact quite right in assuming both are one of the same! Probably just an in-job trait that makes us so fussy about each others work!!
Spencer.



EOS1D4, 7D, 30D, 100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS USM, 70-200/2.8 L IS2 USM, 17-40 f4 L USM, 24-105 f4 L IS USM, 85 f1.8 USM
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 12, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 9020 times:

Do Painters apply the primer coat.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSpencer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1633 posts, RR: 17
Reply 13, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 8955 times:

Depends on how big the job is. If it's a small job then a refinisher (prepper) can apply the epoxy/etch primer/high-build/non-sanding primer themselve. Normally, if any sanding work has been done, and with that I mean filler work, filing or welding, the prepper will get the job ready for the painters so all they'll have to do is just apply Paint. The two procedures are totally different, but as I stated above, to an outsider then all the customer sees is a nice paintjob!
Spencer.



EOS1D4, 7D, 30D, 100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS USM, 70-200/2.8 L IS2 USM, 17-40 f4 L USM, 24-105 f4 L IS USM, 85 f1.8 USM
User currently offlineAvt007 From Canada, joined Jul 2000, 2132 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 8942 times:

The most common use for speed tape that I`ve seen is to cover PRC ( a sealant) that hasn`t quite dried before departure. When replacing many panels, PRC is used to seal the edges, and until it is cured, the airflow can spread it around, making a mess. Put a thin layer of DC4 (silicon) on top of the PRC, then tape over top, and off you go. It looks a little funny, but it works. I`ve seen passengers looking at a windshield that had this treatment, and wonder if the tape was holding the window in! Use the handle of a screwdriver to really work out all the wrinkles on the tape, especially the leading edge, and it`ll stick no problem.

User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2143 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 8898 times:

We use speed tape on the leading edges of our forward equipment doors on the CRJ due to erosion. Funny thing is, even the speed tape gets eroded over time.

User currently offlineAvt007 From Canada, joined Jul 2000, 2132 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 8849 times:

UAL- We used erosion tape (go figure!) on the fwd doors on the Dash 8, as well as on the landing light lenses, and other areas prone to erosion. Occasional replacement is necessary due to yellowing of the tape, but it works well and looks good.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31568 posts, RR: 57
Reply 17, posted (9 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 8837 times:

The High speed tape LE tends to peel after a certain period of time if exposed to the Ram Air flow.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
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