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Differences Between Boeing And Airbus Wing Designs  
User currently offlineThrust From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 2690 posts, RR: 10
Posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 14837 times:

I have been amazed at how easy it is to tell an Airbus apart from a Boeing just by looking at its wing. The Boeing wing consists of several flaps with fewer ailerons...the Airbus wing appears to have a lot more ailerons. What are the advantages that each wing gets from these very different arrangements of ailerons? Also, why does Boeing try to avoid wingtip fences, yet Airbus tries to avoid blended winglets and raked wingtips?


Fly one thing; Fly it well
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 14737 times:

Dude, the idea is to have a better prduct than your competitor, that is the life of business.

Either:

  • Independent invention, or


  • Different part designs have different functions or uses or efficiencies, etc.


  • BTW, all if not all wingtip devices function the same, they cant look however yo ufriggin want them to, they all alter the induced vortex flow to the advantage of the airplane's performance(s).

    I would not want them to be to extremely similar, otherwise there would be lawsuits. Big grin

    I donno.  Sleepy



    The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
    User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
    Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14658 times:

    I guess its a choice of the Manufacturer & what works for them.
    regds
    MEL



    Think of the brighter side!
    User currently offlineJumboJim747 From Australia, joined Oct 2004, 2464 posts, RR: 44
    Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14654 times:

    Maybe as simple as wanting to be different.



    On a wing and a prayer
    User currently offlineDw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1260 posts, RR: 1
    Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 14591 times:

    "The Boeing wing consists of several flaps with fewer ailerons...the Airbus wing appears to have a lot more ailerons."

    Could you explain that a bit more? I was under the impression that designs from both companies either had low speed and high speed ailerons or a single set of ailerons...



    CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
    User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1610 posts, RR: 52
    Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 14511 times:
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    Boeing wings tend to have inboard high speed ailerons and outboard low speed ailerons. The exceptions are the 737 and 757, which only have outboard ailerons. All Boeings have leading edge devices, usually a mixture of Krueger flaps (707, inboard on 727 and 737, variable camber on 747 and I'm told on the 787) and slats (outboard on 727, 737, full span on 757, 767 and 777). Boeing rarely uses winglets (747-400 787-3 are the exceptions and the 737-700 and 737-800 are available with APB winglets). Instead, they are getting hooked on raked wingtips (767-400, 777-300ER, 787-8 and 787-9). All Boeing have spoilers that are used for roll control at higher speeds and as lift dumpers. Boeing originated the idea of using spoiler for roll control on the B-47, to counter aileron reversal from wing torsional windup.

    Airbus used inboard high speed ailerons and outboard low speed ailerons on the A300B2 & B4. In an unusual move, on the A310 they got rid of the low speed ailerons, and this carried over onto the A300-600. The A318/319/320/321, A330/340 and A380 only have outboard ailerons. Airbus uses full-span slats on all their aircraft, but I know that some A300s (and possibly the A310) have a single Krueger flap segment inboard at the wing root. Airbus uses spoilers the same way as Boeing. Airbus has added small winglets to the A310, A300-600, A318/319/320/321 (except the A320-100) and the A380. On the A330/340 the winglet is bigger, but still not as big as the APB winglets.

    For completeness sake, Douglas has full-span slats on the DC-9 and DC-10. On the DC-8, they have slots that opened up inboard of the pylons. The DC-10 has inboard high speed ailerons and outboard low speed ailerons. The DC-8 (I think) and the DC-9 only have outboard ailerons. Douglas never used winglets (except on the MD-11) and also used spoilers like Boeing and Airbus.


    User currently offlineThrust From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 2690 posts, RR: 10
    Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14403 times:

    Here...let me give an example of the clear differences between the Boeing and Airbus wings:


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    Photo © Steve Morris
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    Photo © Stuart Lawson




    Note how Airbus appears to have a single gigantic flap on each wing, while Boeing appears to have two different flaps on each wing? This is a common concept found on both aircraft. Does this help out?



    Fly one thing; Fly it well
    User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8508 posts, RR: 12
    Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 14395 times:

    Differently design philosophy, I guess. Airbus makes their flaps extending all the way across the wing, even though they're not actually a single unit. Boeing goes for deeper flaps with more travel, but they're segmented (they have to be to avoid engine exhaust).

    The DC-10/MD-11 are roughly the same as Boeing's widebodies (flap-wise)


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    Photo © Jet City Aviation Photography
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    Photo © Dmitri Pereslavtsev




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    Photo © Ander Aguirre




    The strange ones are the L-1011's Fowler flaps (which move back and down), and the older VC-10 and C-5 (which look heavy)


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    Photo © Jet City Aviation Photography
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    Photo © Sven De Bevere




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    Photo © KBMphotography



    User currently offlineLeanOfPeak From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 509 posts, RR: 1
    Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 14389 times:

    OK, it was covered...

    [Edited 2005-02-07 08:33:58]

    User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1610 posts, RR: 52
    Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 14356 times:
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    All Boeing and Airbus flaps are Fowler flaps, which translate aft and then pivot down. Douglas used Single Pivot flaps, which moved similar to Fowler flaps.

    The high speed ailerons I referred to are the gap you see in the DC-10, A300, A310, 707, 727, 747, 767 and 777 flaps. The idea was to provide a path for the engine exhaust.

    One other detail - airliner wings typical have "Yehudis", where the trailing edge is extended in the inboard area. This provides depth to contain the landing gear stub spar. Its easier to make the flap in this area a separate piece, as opposed to part of a bigger piece.


    User currently offlineTobi3334 From Germany, joined Sep 2004, 146 posts, RR: 3
    Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 14270 times:

    Look at this picture .... its nice to compare the wing size.


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    Photo © Jason Bisson




    Greetings,
    Tobi


    User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1610 posts, RR: 52
    Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 14189 times:
    Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

    If anyone out there is interested in reading more about airliner wing design (specifically high lift system design), I recommend reading:
    http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19960052267_1996080955.pdf


    User currently offlinePihero From France, joined Jan 2005, 4597 posts, RR: 77
    Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 14137 times:
    Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

    AeroWeanie,
    Many many thanks for hat NASA study. I copied and printed it for constant reference.I wish every system description manual would be so thorough.
    Best regards



    Contrail designer
    User currently offlineThrust From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 2690 posts, RR: 10
    Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 14110 times:

    THanks everyone for your input, especially AeroWeanie for providing that awesome NASA link. It's always nice to learn something new.

    --Thrust



    Fly one thing; Fly it well
    User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
    Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 14004 times:

    Excellent link.
    Thanks.
    regds
    MEL



    Think of the brighter side!
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