Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Eastbound, Westbound, And Fuel Stops  
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3255 times:

I always get them mixed up. Which direction do planes on long haul flights usually need a fuel stop? I want to say eastbound....because I'm thinking there is increased wind and therefore higher fuel burn. But doesnt the prevailing winds flow from west to east? That would give an eastbound a tailwind.

I've seen several flights on the trackers that are able to make long hauls westbound but not eastbound. For example, a flight out of New York can go to HKG non stop but coming back they will probably need a fuel stop. Freighters thatgo between Huntsville and Asia can go westbound non stop but almost always stop in ANC on the way back, with 742's sometimes needing an extra stop.

bruce


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePolAir From United States of America, joined May 2001, 893 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3061 times:

General direction of winds (round a world I think) is from west to east. Therefore, eastbound flights will most likely fly faster (tail wind) and burn less fuel, therefore not requiring to stop. I hope that helps.

User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3042 times:

Well that's what I thought too but there are lots of examples of eastbound flights that require a stop. Are the winds at cruise levels different than here on the ground (opposite direction)?

bruce



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3036 times:

Keep in mind that freighter aircraft, when departing westbound from the USA are rather light...ie; not much cargo.
Lighter weights, with jet transport aircraft, result in a much lower hourly fuel burn, headwind or not.
Westbound, from Asia, for example, they are very heavy (lots of cargo) and as a result, a fuel stop might definitely be required, even with a tailwind.


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3014 times:

What about passenger flights. I don't think an A340 can go from Hong Kong to New York? But they do fly from New York to Hong Kong.

Cathay-Pacific flies an A340 from HKG to NY with a stop in YVR.

bruce



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2996 times:

NYC to HKG is not really a westbound flight. It is more a north-south routing.
Go to Great Circle Mapper http://gc.kls2.com/ and enter JFK-HKG. You will see that the flight goes straight north, near the North pole.



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlinePolAir From United States of America, joined May 2001, 893 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2955 times:

Bruce,
I am not an expert, but 90% of time gound speed will be higher eastbound (at higher altitudes). A lot depends if you can catch a jetstream, it will give you hell of a boost, and as far as I know jetstream can head north, east or south but never west ( correct me here).
Like Citation said, HKG-NYC is not really westbound.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16980 posts, RR: 67
Reply 7, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2924 times:

Quoting Bruce (Reply 4):
. I don't think an A340 can go from Hong Kong to New York?

Depends what version. The 345 could. EWR-SIN is longer.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Eastbound, Westbound, And Fuel Stops
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Summer Temperatures And Fuel And Range posted Fri Jul 21 2006 11:00:09 by Oly720man
Flight Plans And Fuel Forecasts posted Sun Aug 28 2005 20:49:23 by Johnomaha
Speed And Fuel Efficiency - Optimum? posted Sat Nov 27 2004 06:25:00 by TheBigOne
Specific Range And Fuel Consumption posted Thu Apr 22 2004 07:21:30 by B2707SST
Corporate Jet Fuel Stops? posted Fri Mar 2 2001 20:27:27 by Jabpilot
Routes And A/c Fully Loaded With Fuel. posted Mon Nov 6 2006 06:17:47 by Mirrodie
Fuel And Oil Odors During Flight posted Thu May 4 2006 03:31:43 by LVPlanefan
DC-9 And MD-8 Fuel Consumption posted Thu Feb 23 2006 06:04:22 by Rottamo
Freezing Jet Fuel On Airliners And Temperatures posted Wed Dec 28 2005 19:41:42 by Julesmusician
Non-renewable Resources And Jet Fuel posted Wed Nov 24 2004 18:28:29 by Futterman

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format