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Explain These Doo-dads On The MD-82  
User currently offlineSleekjet From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 2046 posts, RR: 22
Posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 4343 times:

This may appear as an effort to get cheap hits, but I'll press on. What is the lever with the red circle around it...and what is the significance of the yellow dot?


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II Cor. 4:17-18
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4324 times:

I think the lever is an angle of attack sensor.. I may be wrong though... I have no idea what the yellow dot is.. A guess is maybe an indicator for the status of the entry door.

I am also not a mechanic or pilot.

[Edited 2005-03-29 21:47:49]

User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4313 times:

Static port?

User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17003 posts, RR: 67
Reply 3, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4303 times:

Just as FLY2HMO, I'm going to guess it's part of the pitot/static system. Where's SlamClick when you need him?


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4285 times:

The device in the red circle is an angle of attack sensor.

Red, yellow, and green dots are blow out indicators for fire extinguishing systems and oxygen systems. Oxygen systems usually use green dots in my experience, though the placement of this one suggests that it could be the crew oxygen system.

The way they work is that there's a line from the bottle (O2 or fire ext) leading to the disk. If the bottle overheats or is fired, the disk gets blown out, giving an obvious indication that the bottle is empty.

Now, this could be something else on the MD-82 - I'm not familiar with it. But that's what it looks like to me.



The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlineTroubleshooter From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 423 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4276 times:

It´s just a guess, too. It looks like a blow out disc which indicates an overpressure condition in its related system.

The "lever" with the red circle around is definately an AOA sensor.

Where are the MD 80 experts???



This job sucks!!! I love this job!!!
User currently offlineDanman From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2002, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4198 times:

You have collectively got it right, O2 blow out indicator and AOA sensor 100%

User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 7, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 4153 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 3):
Where's SlamClick when you need him?

Slam was looking for another MD-80 manual. The one nearest to hand did not depict the yellow spot.

Best I can recall DC-9/MD-80 had the oxygen blowout disk (green) on the lower right fuselage, just forward of the bag pit and very near the bottle.

A yellow blowout disk would be for overpressure discharge of the fire bottles but that should be somewhere within one airplanelength of the fire extinguishing system - in other words, near the engines and APU.

It also looks too big to be one of these plastic disks as I remember them being no bigger than a nickel. That object seems to be at least two fingers wide, measuring by the captain's hand.

Rain repellant blowout disk?

Waiting for an AA MadDog pilot or mechanic to jump in.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently onlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2748 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 4128 times:

As said by everyone else, the lever in the red circle is an AOA sensor.

The yellow dot is not a blow out disc. All AA MD-80s have them to help properly align the jetbridge with the aircraft. American paints a line on the floor of the jetbridge, and whoever is driving the jetbridge matches up the line with the yellow dot on the aircraft.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4097 times:

Alias1024 got to it first...I was going to say, I had never seen these on the nose of a DL Mad Dog, but instead they carry an inverted T to help with jetbridge docking, located around the same place as AA's dot.

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Good question though, Sleekjet  Smile

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineSkywatch From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 923 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3893 times:

I'm kind of new at this, but are those fins below the windscreen vortice creators to reduce cockpit wind noise? I just read around on here to learn, and have never worked on any aircraft at all. Feel free to correct me!

[Edited 2005-03-30 07:10:52]


------Forever Watchin' The Sky------
User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3875 times:

Those under the windscreen are the pitot tubes. I'm almost 100% certain

Lately I think I got it but get it all wrong!  bomb 


Alfredo


User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3867 times:

All AA MD-80s have them to help properly align the jetbridge with the aircraft.

There ya go. We can all learn something here.

Air Can is putting black and white discs on their A320's, to use with an automated bridge system at Toronto. Same idea.



The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3847 times:

Quoting Skywatch (Reply 10):
are those fins below the windscreen vortice creators to reduce cockpit wind noise?

They are definitely pitot tubes, but I don't remember why there are three of them.  banghead 


User currently offlineFBU 4EVER! From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 998 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (9 years 4 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3842 times:

There are three pitot tubes forward of the windscreen,one for each pitot/static system (Captain's,First Officer's and the Auxiliary system).

Further down on the fuselage,there are strakes on either side of the fuselage.They serve to smoothen the airflow over the wing at high angles of attack and thus increase rudder effectiveness during flap extension/retraction.The old DC-9-41 has a hydraulically operated flap/rudder throw limiter that limits rudder deflection to 13 degrees under these circumstances.A complicated system that was replaced by strakes from the DC-9-50 onwards.



"Luck and superstition wins all the time"!
User currently offlineN685FE From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 451 posts, RR: 11
Reply 15, posted (9 years 4 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3630 times:

The 80's also have a rudder throw limiter, it also has a hyd assisted elevator when you push the stick past a certain number of degrees nose down. I forget the exact number, but it is to help during stalls, the 90's also have this system on the T/E of the engine pylons.


psp. lead by example
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (9 years 4 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3534 times:

I believe the strakes on the nose (as well as the ones on the tail) served the same purpose, that is to aid in stall recovery, specifically deep stalls? (I may be criss-crossing some of my facts here)

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineFBU 4EVER! From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 998 posts, RR: 7
Reply 17, posted (9 years 4 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 3417 times:

No,the strakes on the nose are for aerodynamic purposes as mentioned.They are also anti-iced by pneumatics on the MD-80 and electrically on the MD-90.The strakes on the nacelles are for stall-recovery purposes by adding more horizontal area in the tail area.The idea is that this will allow the nose to fall somewhat faster than the tail area due to drag,thus making deep stall recovery more likely.These strakes are not heated in any way.


"Luck and superstition wins all the time"!
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