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Types Of Circuit Breakers On Commericial Jets  
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Posted (9 years 2 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 7866 times:

What are the Types [Amperage wise & Colour coding wise] used on the Circuit Breaker [CB] panel of a Modern Commercial Aircraft.
Does it differ from Aircraft type.If so How much is the Variation.
regds
MEL


Think of the brighter side!
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 7858 times:

Perhaps the following photo will help... Big grin

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Photo © Gabriel Savit



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Cheers,
Gabriel  Wink


User currently offlineB747FE From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2004, 230 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 7796 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Thread starter):
What are the Types [Amperage wise & Colour coding wise] used on the Circuit Breaker [CB] panel of a Modern Commercial Aircraft.

Aircraft circuit breakers are normally rated from 1/2 to 100 amps, and to be used in 28VDC / 115VAC / 400HZ single or three phase circuits, bimetallic or electromagnetic type. Only trip–free/manual reset design are used in aviation.

Temperature Compensated: Permit installation of smaller gauge wire where the circuit breaker and wiring are exposed to different ambient temperatures.
Trip-Free: Can not be maintained closed even with the actuator button held in closed position.
Arc–Fault Protection: Capable of recognize arcing conditions.

Regards,
B747FE.



"Flying is more than a sport and more than a job; flying is pure passion and desire, which fill a lifetime"
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7724 times:

Thanks.
How about colour coded.Normally Black but some Green & Yellow.
Im aware of painted CBs in yellow to illustrate certain critical CBs.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineDC8FriendShip From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 242 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 7704 times:

I believe( but not 100% sure) that all breakers must be black with white in the trip zone (push/pull only). The yellow caps generally denote breakers to be pulled on extended turns or domiciles.

Regards, Chris



Come fly the Friendly Skies of United
User currently offlineNRA-3B From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 165 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7678 times:

I've seen them painted white or yellow, and with red or yellow plastic caps. Generally the markings denote the most used circuits (as in shutting off on the ground during maintenance). The interesting part is that sometimes the paint is so thick, you can no longer read the current marking. This sucks if you have to replace a cb. You have to take the panel apart before you can order a replacement........ Or if you are just checking out a circuit to see how it is brakered.
Cheers,
Bob


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7667 times:

Hawk-

I have seen a few CB's that have clip on colars for quick identification. Most that I have seen a White. If a CB is left open it will have a locking colar so the flight crews can't push it in...those are red.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 7649 times:

The locking collars come in all kinds of colours. At Shannon Aerospace during heavy maintenance checks each team had differently coloured locking collars with little "Remove before flight" flags, e.g. Avionics = blue, Cabin = black, Engines = red etc. .
This way, if a C/B was left pulled at the end of the check, you could easily approach whoever put them there (since so many C/Bs were pulled, written tags were impossible to use).

On the A300-600 there are two rows of marked C/Bs on the right bottom edge of the overhead C/B panel. These are the C/Bs of the so called minimum equipment rack (96VU) in the avionics bay. This shelf was seperately enclosed and fireproofed and contained the most important equipment. There was a seperate smoke detector for this rack and in case of smoke in this rack, the F/O would have to pull the marked C/Bs.

Jan


User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 7631 times:

On the A320 series, most breakers are black, but some are green. Green ones are monitored, and will display a message on the ECAM if pulled / popped. It doesn't specify which breaker, but gives a number of rows. Can't remember the exact wording of the message, but it's something like "C/B Popped Rows P-R".


The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 7614 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 7):
At Shannon Aerospace during heavy maintenance checks each team had differently coloured locking collars with little "Remove before flight" flags, e.g. Avionics = blue, Cabin = black, Engines = red etc. .
This way, if a C/B was left pulled at the end of the check, you could easily approach whoever put them there

Very Interesting Method.Makes a lot of sense too.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7639 times:

Quoting 320tech (Reply 8):
On the A320 series, most breakers are black, but some are green. Green ones are monitored, and will display a message on the ECAM if pulled / popped. It doesn't specify which breaker, but gives a number of rows. Can't remember the exact wording of the message, but it's something like "C/B Popped Rows P-R".

Same on the A300-600, you will get an ECAM message and a light will turn on on the maintenance panel behind the F/O´s seat.

Jan


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