Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Average Air Frame Hours  
User currently offlineKrisYYZ From Canada, joined Nov 2004, 1593 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1999 times:

I was just wondering what's would be an average amount of flight hours for a 10 year old aircraft. I know that engines can be replaced and swapped between planes, but how long are airframes suppose to last?

Are "D" checks where aircraft are basically taken apart and put back together?

Thanks,

Krisyyz

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1992 times:

Well, each aircraft is different. A 747-400/A330 -v- a 737-300/A320 would have different daily cycles and flight hours. The 747/A330 might have 10 hours per day, with 1 cycle.... where the 737/A320 might have 4 or 5 cycles and 12 hours per day. Cycles are the real driving force on any aircraft. Most of the regional aircraft I deal with at 10 years old are in the 18-20K hours and cycles.


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineOzLAME From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1952 times:

For the majority of turboprop a/c I have seen that are working for a living, the magic number seems to be about 2200 hours a year, with about forty minutes per cycle. There is of course wide variation, but that seems to be a fairly good average. The highest-time a/c I have worked on so far is a DC-3 with about 60 000 hours TTIS and it is still in service; I have also worked on a DC-3 with only 17 000 hours TTIS, while the fleet leader among DC-3s is up over 90 000 hrs TTIS.
An airframe will last for as long as it's owners are willing to spend money on it; several jetliners have reached 100 000 hrs TTIS. I believe that some of Northwest's DC-9s are the hardest-working a/c ever and are approaching 100 000 cycles.



Monty Python's Flying Circus has nothing to do with aviation, except perhaps for Management personnel.
User currently offline2enginesonly From Netherlands, joined Jun 2005, 91 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1943 times:

Our B767's and MD11's run at about 4500-5000 hours a year so after 10 years this would be 45,000-50,000 flighthours.
We've had one DC10 that went back to MDC for testing because of its high flighthours....don't know exactly how much the a/c had so I have to figure that out.
The DC10's left the company after 16-18 years so they had around 80,000 flthrs.

Arjan


User currently offlineCaboclo From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 203 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1878 times:

According to the A.net A/C Data page, many DC-8s have passed 100,000 hours. I expect some 727s are also close to that.


Freight dogs have more fun
User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1867 times:

EMBQA, how have you found the older RJ's holding up after several years in service? The consensus at work is that the RJ's won't hold up too well as they begin to age, since they aren't really designed for this type of flying.

User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1821 times:

Quoting UAL Bagsmasher (Reply 5):
The consensus at work is that the RJ's won't hold up too well as they begin to age, since they aren't really designed for this type of flying.

The ERJ's were designed from the ground up, they should be fine. The CRJ's are the stretched Biz jets... they're the ones not designed for it.


User currently offlinePilawt From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 101 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 1812 times:

Quoting OzLAME (Reply 2):
the fleet leader among DC-3s is up over 90 000 hrs TTIS

Here it is, with over 91,400 hours TTAF. Around the airport this airplane is affectionately called "Captain Eddie," because it was flown away from the Santa Monica factory in 1937 by Eddie Rickenbacker himself, on behalf of Eastern Air Lines. It later served with Trans-Texas Airways and Provincetown-Boston Airlines before being restored to its original registration and livery in the early 1990's. For more information about this airplane see http://bluegrassairlines.com/feature_apr2003.htm


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bob Garrard
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Aad van der Voet




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jean
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jean



Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Average Air Frame Hours
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Air Driven Generator posted Mon Nov 13 2006 16:45:36 by FutureUApilot
How Do You Track Flight Hours posted Fri Nov 3 2006 19:09:33 by Airfoilsguy
Korean Air @ Tripoli, Libya posted Tue Oct 31 2006 09:27:50 by Rufruf
Air Lauder ( Circa 1992 ) posted Sat Oct 28 2006 18:58:58 by Rufruf
Air Tahiti Nui A340 C-Checks posted Fri Oct 27 2006 03:41:34 by Corsair2
Question On Air Feed To An Afterburning Turbojet posted Thu Oct 19 2006 17:55:41 by TripleDelta
Air Compression And Combustion Chamber Question posted Fri Oct 6 2006 01:29:43 by Blackened
Air Scanner While Inflight. posted Sat Sep 30 2006 18:24:04 by COEWR737
Speed Of Air Out Of The GE-90-115's Back End posted Sun Sep 10 2006 01:47:24 by UAL747
Air Cargo Warehouse Pallet Loader posted Sat Sep 2 2006 03:46:15 by Speedbird70

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format