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Ramp Egronomics  
User currently offlineBWI757 From Israel, joined Dec 2004, 429 posts, RR: 2
Posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2191 times:

I'm starting this post based on several previous threads about ramp and MX life. My wife is also an occupational therapist in private practice who has also piqued my interests in this topic:

We talked about ear protection options and Skydrol hazards in the forum.

My question is what specific kinds of training and equipment do airlines/ground handling companies provide to minimize injury on the job?

For example, baggage handling: Is there any time spent on how to properly handle the bags to minimize spine injury? You probably get kneepads, but are there specific techniques that can be used to mininize injury and knee-bashing when crawling around the holds?

Do airlines talk to you about items like db lelvels and prolonged exposure problems, or just toss the ear protectors at you and say "use 'em"?

In light of the Skydrol discussion, don't you get protective gear to shield eyes, etc?

On hot days, are you reminded to remain hydrated?

Just some topic starters to give a general idea what I am looking for, but please add any other items. Thanks!

BWI757


I live in the US but my heart is in Jerusalem!
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2155 times:

We use annual training on lifting techniques (and general ergonomics), hearing protection (with a hearing test), personal protective equipment and clothing, hazardous materials and driving.

We will also provide reminders about weather and environmental hazards as the appropiate season approaches.


User currently offlineAvioniker From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1109 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2149 times:

The federal regulations from OSHA, FAA, EPA and too many others to count are so profuse that any omission of training covering the items you question above would likely (and often) result in some pretty hefty fines.
Air2gxs summed it up simply and adequately.
The ergonomics are really pretty simple;
ramp hard, you soft, use appropriate and adequate protective gear.

[Edited 2005-06-22 20:02:45]


One may educate the ignorance from the unknowing but stupid is forever. Boswell; ca: 1533
User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2129 times:

Quoting BWI757 (Thread starter):
You probably get kneepads

What are those???  Silly

Most of what you stated is/SHOULD be common sense. Ample supplies of water are available on the hot days. I generally always wear sunglasses out on the ramp, so there's your eyeprotection. I always alternate different kinds of ear protection. The earbands with the rubber little thingys that go in your ears will really screw up my ears with prolonged use, so sometimes I mix foamies in the rotation, sometimes muffs. NEVER go out without something in the ears. I'm not that dumb...but I know some who are. Lifting bags and whatnot should be common sense. (keyword SHOULD). But some still don't listen. The smarter rampers do.

Quoting Avioniker (Reply 2):
The ergonomics are really pretty simple;
ramp hard, you soft, use appropriate and adequate protective gear.

 rotfl   rotfl   rotfl  So true!

fluffy


User currently offlineFlySC From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 136 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2053 times:

Well I work for a company that does ground handling work for UPS at CAE Columbia metro airport. I know that we are provided with earplugs and shown how to use them. They also have rules that anytime we are on the ramp and there is any loud noise or a plane running we are to have them on. They do not provide us with any eye protection but there really isn't any situations where we would need it. We are taught the proper methods for moving packages and we actually slide packages more than anything. We are also taught all of the different ramp safety procedures. The UPS management is really pretty good about enforcing the rules. I got busted for not chocking my tug even though I was only a few feet away and within view of it about a week ago. We also have to go through some training on hazmat since UPS does ship some of these materials. The company is very strict on the handling and training of this. Luckily i work the night shift so I do not have to worry about the heat and sun but we do have rules at night such as running our headlights in ground equipment and the equipment must have a working amber flashing or rotating light.
Fly Safely,
Jason D.



I do not fail!!! I succede at finding what does not work!!!
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2047 times:

Ramp Ergonomics? HAHAHAHA  Smile

I'll remember that one next time I'm hooking up the fuel hose to any jet. Some of the smaller jets are the worst to do as they are often massive afterthoughts and require some wierd movements and lifting to get to the recepticle.

Seriously though. Our company provides hearing tests and we now have a "Stretch and Flex" guide to use before an aircraft comes in. Many airlines and ground handling companies have engrained saftey into their corporate culture. Accidents cost money. Things as small as FOD detail can be very costly if a plane is damaged and no amount of money could make up for the loss of a human life.

After that, the safety of workers is a quandry. The vehicles really don't have any "ergonomic" designs, you're stretching in wierd ways and lifting heavy objects in tight spaces where you really can't use your legs. The accident in DCA two weeks ago reminds us all of the hazards when we don't think things through. We've had a good discussion about hearing protection lately, and lets not forget that we are working in close proximity to props, jet exhaust, and other random hazards.



DMI
User currently offlineBwi757 From Israel, joined Dec 2004, 429 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2025 times:

It also occured to me that if the company can prove that they adequately equip and train personnel, their workmans comp and other related insurance premuims could be reduced - similar to defensive driving classes. Anyone privy to the insurance side here that can comment?

Thanks for the posts, keep them coming!

BWI757



I live in the US but my heart is in Jerusalem!
User currently offlinePogo From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 355 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2010 times:

Right, I work for a handling company at LHR, we have a dedicated team of 4 'trainers' who will show everyone in the company how to use all the types of equipment and to be aware of the ramp environment.
For every piece of equipment there is a test paper which must be passed before he/she can use it, so if they do have an accident, if required the relevant parties can confirm that they are trained on that specific piece of equipment.
New starters are shown the importance of correct lifting techniques, although as has been said before there is only so much you can do when you are in a small a/c hold.
Everyone is given ear defenders when they start, some prefer the foam plugs,
there are always safety reminders about noise levels on the ramp.
For those that do de-icing they each have their own one piece suit and heat protective gloves and protective glasses.
On hot days everyone knows that they need to re-hydrate, we have two chilled water dispensers and a drinks dispenser, coke etc.which are always available to everyone.
If everyone used their common sense then there should not be a problem, but once you start rushing around and not concentrating, then standards slip and accidents WILL happen.



When in doubt give it a clout
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1996 times:

Quoting BWI757 (Thread starter):
Is there any time spent on how to properly handle the bags to minimize spine injury? You probably get kneepads, but are there specific techniques that can be used to mininize injury and knee-bashing when crawling around the holds

No Knee pads for the Rampers  Smile
Technique training is def Imparted & refreshed Anually.

Quoting BWI757 (Thread starter):
Do airlines talk to you about items like db lelvels and prolonged exposure problems, or just toss the ear protectors at you and say "use 'em

Yes.Part of the Training.

Quoting BWI757 (Thread starter):
In light of the Skydrol discussion, don't you get protective gear to shield eyes, etc

Yes.

Quoting BWI757 (Thread starter):
On hot days, are you reminded to remain hydrated

Yes.

For Mx there is a Refresher Training conducted Bi-Anually covereing all aspects.Also Technical Circulars,General Safety Circulars & Flight Safety Circulars are Issued by QC Dept all the time.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineB744F From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 1944 times:

Quoting Pogo (Reply 7):
coke etc.

A soda is the last thing you would want to hydrate yourself with!!


User currently offlinePogo From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 355 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1928 times:

Quoting Pogo (Reply 7):
coke etc.

A soda is the last thing you would want to hydrate yourself with!!

I know that, always water first, then a cold can on my forehead and neck, then down the can in one. wink 



When in doubt give it a clout
User currently offlineB744F From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1902 times:

you should drink more water after that, soda dehydrates you.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 12, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1896 times:

Quoting Pogo (Reply 10):
I know that, always water first, then a cold can on my forehead and neck, then down the can in one

Preffered to only have Water.Avoid the Soda.
Inflight Dehydration
Dehydration Outdoors
 Smile
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineTwinCommander From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 158 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1869 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 5):
I'll remember that one next time I'm hooking up the fuel hose to any jet. Some of the smaller jets are the worst to do as they are often massive afterthoughts and require some wierd movements and lifting to get to the recepticle.

Falcon 50, 2000 and westwinds come to mind...  banghead 


User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 11
Reply 14, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1854 times:

Westwinds, Falcons, and Gulfstreams give me trouble in particular. Hawkers come in there too, especially when the APU is running.


DMI
User currently offlineDC8FriendShip From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 242 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

Quoting FlySC (Reply 4):
I got busted for not chocking my tug even though I was only a few feet away and within view of it about a week ago.

Haha! Chocks are for airplanes.  bigthumbsup  Really though, i know how you feel, I used to work for a UPS contractor.  hissyfit 

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 5):
I'll remember that one next time I'm hooking up the fuel hose to any jet. Some of the smaller jets are the worst to do as they are often massive afterthoughts and require some wierd movements and lifting to get to the recepticle.

Try fueling a Sabreliner, you have to kneel on the ground and force the hose to bend in a way it doesn't want to.  Smile



Come fly the Friendly Skies of United
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 1800 times:

Quoting DC8FriendShip (Reply 15):
Haha! Chocks are for airplanes

Out here all Grd Equipment when parked need to be Chocked  Smile
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineDC8FriendShip From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 242 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 1792 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 16):
Out here all Grd Equipment when parked need to be Chocked

We are only required to use chocks on equipment if the parking brake is Inop. any other time, we don't use them. However it is the operators responsibility if a brake is left unset and rolls into something.



Come fly the Friendly Skies of United
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (9 years 2 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1780 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 14):
Westwinds, Falcons, and Gulfstreams give me trouble in particular. Hawkers come in there too, especially when the APU is running.

No kidding...Gulfstream I's were the worst, climbing up on those wings to overwing fuel 750-ish gallons a side...can we say fun? That Westwind wasn't very cool either...any lower and that hose wouldn't fit. My most hated plane was the Beechjet...overwing each side, THEN get a ladder and climb up to fill the "trunk" up...right next to a still-hot engine exhaust.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 16):
Out here all Grd Equipment when parked need to be Chocked

Signature was the chock nazi...any tug or bag cart, even a lav truck, had to be chocked 100% of the time, even if it had an operable parking break and wasn't working on an a/c. Waste of time if you ask me.


On Delta ramp, they usually make a big jug of Gatorade whenever it's hot out...usually the whole thing gets killed before the sun's down. Other than that, stay in the shade.

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 19, posted (9 years 2 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1747 times:

Quoting DeltaGuy (Reply 18):
Signature was the chock nazi...any tug or bag cart, even a lav truck, had to be chocked 100% of the time, even if it had an operable parking break and wasn't working on an a/c. Waste of time if you ask me.

Yesterday we had South Westerly Winds upto 35kts on the Ground During our Loading Operation.We had to Ensure all Equipment around the Aircraft were chocked.
As a precaution we kept a Hyd pump running.
For Bom 35 kts is a lot  Smile
Another 10 kts & we had to cease Work as the STC forbids Open Main Deck cargo door during winds exceeding 45 kts.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
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