Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
2 Man Cockpits  
User currently offlineGg190 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 160 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2011 times:

Which was the first jet or turboprop airliner to introduce the 2 man cockpit?

Also didn'y some props like the DC-3 and Vickers Viking have 2 man cockpits?

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4577 posts, RR: 40
Reply 1, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1944 times:

To my knowledge, some of the earliest would be the Vickers Viscount Model 724, which introduced a two man cockpit to that family, and the BAC-111, which I am pretty sure had a two man flight deck right from the get go (and was in the air before either the DC-9 or 737).

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineJDD1 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 94 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1919 times:

The Vickers Viscount had a two-crew cockpit. (The first civil turbo-prop)
The DC-9 was the twin-engined jet airliner to have a two-crew cockpit.
The A300-B4 FFCC was the first widebody jet airliner with a two-crew cockpit.
The 747-400 is also two-crew.


User currently offlinePatrickj From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 89 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1730 times:

Ford Tri Motor had a two man cockpit and flew before the DC-3.

Consolidated Commodore and the Sikorsky S-40 Flying Boats were two man as well


User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3708 posts, RR: 34
Reply 4, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1691 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting JDD1 (Reply 2):
The DC-9 was the twin-engined jet airliner to have a two-crew cockpit.

I think the BAC One-Eleven beat the DC9 into the air.


User currently offlineCapt.Fantastic From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 751 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1640 times:

The correct terminology is two-crew cockpit - let's not be sexist ... There are women pilots, in case you guys haven't noticed  Smile JOD1 you got it right!

User currently offlineJDD1 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 94 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 1453 times:

How could I possibly have forgotten the BAC1-11. I hang my head in shame.
VC-10 Thanks for the correction.
JDD


User currently offlineKFLLCFII From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3310 posts, RR: 30
Reply 7, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1418 times:

Quoting Capt.Fantastic (Reply 5):
The correct terminology is two-crew cockpit

Well if you really want to be technical, it would be "two-crewmember cockpit". There is only one crew.  Wink



"About the only way to look at it, just a pity you are not POTUS KFLLCFII, seems as if we would all be better off."
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8468 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1389 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Oh give the politically correct crap a rest....2 man is perfectly fine, it obviously refers to man as homo sapien and not as a specific gender.


After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2556 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1381 times:

Actually, some of the airplanes listed here (namely the Sikorsky and Douglas DC-3) may have had some three man configurations due to the need for nav/com radios. Remember in the early days the radios were not user friendly and not always set up for the Captain or First Officer to transmit as they are today. I believe the C-47 flew with a radio operator. On the DC-4, -6 and -7 radio duties fell to the FE.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic 2 Man Cockpits
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Approach And Departures From 06/24 At MAN posted Mon Jul 3 2006 15:38:31 by CalAir
Airbus LCD Cockpits posted Tue Feb 14 2006 18:40:56 by Henny
A300/100 Cockpits posted Thu Feb 2 2006 07:47:19 by AirWillie6475
The Most Ergonomic Cockpits posted Tue Jan 17 2006 21:08:20 by TripleDelta
How Similar Are 757 And 767 Cockpits? posted Tue Dec 6 2005 18:17:46 by Mozart
MAN Flex SRS Runway/check - Checklist Question posted Sun Nov 20 2005 18:09:36 by Julesmusician
Cockpits Hidden Gem posted Thu Sep 22 2005 09:04:42 by NASOCEANA
Question About MAN Ops posted Sun Aug 14 2005 18:59:18 by Marksanderson
Backup Instruments In Glass Cockpits posted Tue Jul 19 2005 15:51:08 by Glom
Takeoff Performance Figures - DUB -V- MAN posted Wed Jun 8 2005 20:22:03 by Kaitak

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format