Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Boeing 757 Windsheild Failure  
User currently offlineJcrocker From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4282 times:

Before I begin I must let you know that I am not an expert in any aspect of aviation as it seems many of you are in the tech/ops section.

On August 13, 2005 my wife and I were leaving for our vacation in Cuba, departing from Toronto, Canada and arriving in Varadero, Cuba. Our vacation package included air travel with a charter provider called Skyservice (flight number 5G384). We boarded a 'well used' Boeing 757 (unsure which configuration 200-300) and left Toronto on time at 0620. The pilot indicated that the cruising altitude for our flight would be 39,000ft and that our expect time of arrival in Varadero would be 0955.

The interior of the aircraft was very dated and dirty, just as one would expect with a cheap charter flight. The first half of the flight was uneventful, there was very little turbulence and we were as comfortable as could expected. The flight staff served an in-flight snack about 45 minutes into the flight followed by a drink service.

At approximately 1.5 hours into the flight someplace in the vicinity of Pittsburgh (later indicated by pilot) the pilot made an announcement for all flight staff to standby for a conference call. Immediately following this conference call which lasted about 1.5-2 minutes the aircraft turned from a southerly heading to a northerly heading. Once the heading had been changed the pilot address the passengers stating only that there had been a mechanical failure aboard the aircraft and that we would be making an emergency landing and that once he knew where we would be landing he would advise all passengers. Less than 3 minutes after hearing from the pilot the aircraft made the steepest dive I had ever experienced on a commercial aircraft before which lasted for a period of time I am unsure of due to sheer fear but it could not have been more than 2 minutes maybe.

Once the aircraft leveled off the pilot came over the intercom system and indicated the passengers that the mechanical problem the plane was experiencing was a crack in the windshield on the first officer's side of the flight deck. He went on to explain that he had reduced the altitude of the aircraft to 10,000ft and that we would be returning to Toronto.

Prior to the dive to 10,000ft the flight staff ran down the aisle of the aircraft collecting trash as quickly as possible and dumping the garbage bags in the lavatory before taking up position in their jump seats. It was quite obvious that the flight staff were very stressed and fearful. Needless to say the reaction of the flight staff to the situation only intensified the fear amongst passengers. Without getting into the emotional / psychological aspects of this situation suffice it to say that is was the most terrifying 1.5 hours (returning to Toronto) of any person's life that I talked to on the aircraft.

We did eventually arrive back in Toronto quickly landing without incident. The aircraft was unload as normal at the terminal where we were informed by Skyservice staff that the aircraft would be repaired and be ready for departure at 1530 that afternoon. I along with every other passenger felt very uncomfortable getting back on this aircraft after it had been repaired however the tour operator told us that refunds were not an option and that if we failed to get back on the aircraft we would have to forfeit the entire cost of our vacation. To make up for this inconvenience and the 20 years the just shaved off of everyone's life they gave us vouchers for $125.00 off our next flight with Skyservice. To add insult to injury the Skyservice staff and tour operator representative were condescending and deceitful to many of the passengers that approached them to voice concern over the incident, downplaying the entire ordeal. At 1530 my wife and I re-boarded the same 757 with a new windshield and a new pilot and flight staff and made it to our destination without any further incident.

On August 20, 2005 we were scheduled to return from Varadero on the same 757 dubbed flight number 5G385 but were informed by our tour operator that the aircraft we were to return on had been grounded due to mechanical problems on Monday August 15, 2005...the day following the crash in Greece. Needless to say our return flight was delayed by almost 17 hours because an equipment change to a A319 meant that multiple trips had to be made to return the group that arrived by the 757.

I will include links to some pictures I was able to take of the cracked windshield at the bottom of this post for you to take a look at. What I would really appreciate is some candid feedback on my situation. Did the pilot do the right thing by returning to Toronto? It is my understanding that if the aircraft had of made an emergency landing any place other than the airport it departed from that it would be ground and repairs possibly inaccessible resulting the tour operator having to charter another flight or flights which would ultimately result in a substantial financial loss.

Prior to re-boarding the repaired aircraft I had the opportunity to speak with the new pilot and first officer for 5 minutes or so. The pilot was very reassuring and explained to me that the windshield had cracked as the result of a failure in a defrosting unit which had overheated. Is this a common mechanical problem? Please give me your thoughts on the severity of the incident I have explained and any details on the actual failure itself. I am sincerely hoping that becoming more informed will help me and my wife overcome our new apprehension of flying brought on by this incident.

http://media.consolesource.com/images/IMG_2241.JPG
http://media.consolesource.com/images/IMG_2243.JPG

26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4231 times:

Crack windshields are, while not common, not unheard. I don't have an AMM with me, but the windshield on a B757 is probably made of at least 3 layers of glass and plastics. They are extremely robust and the load bearing pane is usually the inner or middle pane. Cracks almost always occur on the outer pane. Initiating an expedited dive was probably not necessary, but that's up to the crew.

The flight crew was correct in saying it was probably caused by a faulty window heat unit, because really short of a bullet, few things can damamge a flight deck winshield.

And, they probably returned to the origin for the reason stated. The plabe is a whole lot easier to repair there than at a remote destination.


User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4216 times:

Happens more often than you think. No big deal. You replace the windshield, pressurize the plane to check for leaks, and you are on your way in most cases. Why would anyone be afraid to get back on a plane that had a cracked window that had since been replaced? That's like saying I'm afraid to drive my car because yesterday I had a flat tire that I have since replaced. Sounds like a case of people wanting something for nothing at the expense of the airline. I can understand compensation for the delay, but not compensation for the 'emotional trauma one suffered as a result of a window change.'

User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4187 times:

I'm with UALbagsmasher...

Yawn..!! A cracked windshield, I've changed a few dozen in my 10 years. Boring..!!



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4182 times:

EMBQA, just keep the cardboard handy Wink

User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4162 times:

...just keep the cardboard handy

Don't forget the speed tape..!!



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 4142 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 5):
...just keep the cardboard handy

Don't forget the speed tape..!!

Hey, don't forget to help the next guy. String and plenty of it.


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4099 times:

Hello Jcrocker.

Welcome to the forums!  spin 

Well, that sure is a drag that your wife & yourself (and other pax) had to go through the feelings of being worried  worried  about what was going on with the aircraft you were in. It's too bad you didn't have someone sitting near you who was a pilot or aircraft mechanic, etc, who could have explained to you that the jet was going to be fine & to just relax & enjoy the extra time above the clouds while the pro's in the cockpit took care of business.

Here's how I would have handled your situation ..... "What's that Mrs Flight Attendant, you mean I'll get to have three extra hours of flight plus another takeoff & landing for free! Yeeee Haaaa! That's Great!!! Bring it on!!! Big grin

When I was a ramp rat at the Toronto Island Airport in the late 80's, I marshaled in one of my company's Dash-8's after it arrived from Montreal, & was surprised to see the whole right side windscreen cracked!  Wow! The aircraft was hit by something right in the middle of the co-pilot's windscreen while cruising at 24,000 feet. The pilots put on their oxygen masks and continued without further problems (except zero visibility through the right side). Because there was no sign of a bird strike (blood & feathers, etc), the pilots & mechanics figured the Dash-8 was hit by a piece of ice that had fallen from an airliner higher up. What are the odds eh?

The windscreen was a real mess because the tiny heating wires between the several panes of glass had shorted out, which caused the windscreen to heat up instantly so much that the layers of plastic between the panes were burning & melting out through the cracks. At first I thought there was bird guts all over the windscreen, but it was fried plastic from within the glass.

At least the windscreen didn't completely fail and enter the cockpit! That shows how strong they really are.

Here's what a cracked windscreen can look like from inside a jet's cockpit. This isn't as bad as the Dash-8 incident I mentioned. The photographer states this .....

"The windshield heat element failed to begin this process."


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Robert Thomas



PS, aren't you glad you had the guts to get back onboard and continue with your trip? Were there any passengers who didn't get back onboard?

>> Question ...... Can pilots turn off the windshield heat for individual windows in the cockpit if one of them gets cracked, so that anti-icing can still be used on the other windows if needed? Or does a flip of the On/Off switch turn off the heat for all the windows?

Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4092 times:

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
>> Question ...... Can pilots turn off the windshield heat for individual windows in the cockpit if one of them gets cracked, so that anti-icing can still be used on the other windows if needed? Or does a flip of the On/Off switch turn off the heat for all the windows?

There's no single switch that controls all of them--that'd be a potential single-point failure. The windows (the ones that are heated) have individual switches.


User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4090 times:

Not in all circumstances does a cracked windshield require immediate replacement. I also do not have a MM (Maintenance Manual) in front of me, but they're made up of multiple 'plies', and cracking on the outer panes which are not considered structural is sometimes allowed.

User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4088 times:

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
Because there was no sign of a bird strike (blood & feathers, etc), the pilots & mechanics figured the Dash-8 was hit by a piece of ice that had fallen from an airliner higher up. What are the odds eh?

Just happened the other day...  Wink ATL-ONT

********************************************************************************
** Report created 8/22/2005 Record 3 **
********************************************************************************

IDENTIFICATION
Regis#: DAL275 Make/Model: B757 Description: B-757
Date: 08/20/2005 Time: 1502

Event Type: Incident Highest Injury: None Mid Air: N Missing: N
Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
City: LITTLE ROCK State: AR Country: US

DESCRIPTION
DELTA AIRLINES, DAL275, A BOEING B757, STRUCK FROZEN RESIDUE WHILE AT
FL340, DAMAGING THE WINDSHIELD, NO REPORTED INJURIES, LITTLE ROCK, AR

INJURY DATA Total Fatal: 0
# Crew: 0 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:
# Pass: 0 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:
# Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

WEATHER: NOT REPORTED

OTHER DATA
Activity: Business Phase: Cruise Operation: Air Carrier

Departed: Dep Date: Dep. Time:
Destination: Flt Plan: Wx Briefing:
Last Radio Cont:
Last Clearance:

FAA FSDO: LITTLE ROCK, AR (SW11) Entry date: 08/22/2005


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4085 times:

Hi guys.

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 8):
There's no single switch that controls all of them--that'd be a potential single-point failure. The windows (the ones that are heated) have individual switches.

Thanks OPNLguy for clearing that up for me. I'd be surprised if the windows that are heated could be either ALL on or ALL off.


Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1609 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (9 years 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4074 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
At least the windscreen didn't completely fail and enter the cockpit!

If a windshield fails at altitude, it blows out, not in. See: http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19900610-1

To quote the important part:
"The accident happened when the aircraft was climbing through 17,300 feet on departure from Birmingham. The left windscreen, which had been replaced prior to the flight, was blown out under effects of the cabin pressure when it overcame the retention of the securing bolts, 84 of which, out of a total of 90, were of smaller than specified diameter. The commander was sucked halfway out of the windscreen aperture and was restrained by cabin crew whilst the co-pilot flew the aircraft to a safe landing at Southampton Airport."


User currently offlineTimT From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 168 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4056 times:

I'm a bit surprised the crew did an emergency descent- the Boeing COM manual has a section dedicated to a windscreen crack. As long as it's not bulging, it states continue flight. IMHO, a lower altitude would not hurt a thing. I don't have a copy of the COM with me, but I was involved in that situation and we just motored on.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4006 times:

Quoting Jcrocker (Thread starter):
The pilot was very reassuring and explained to me that the windshield had cracked as the result of a failure in a defrosting unit which had overheated

Correct term would be WHCU or Window Heat control unit.

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
Can pilots turn off the windshield heat for individual windows in the cockpit if one of them gets cracked, so that anti-icing can still be used on the other windows if needed? Or does a flip of the On/Off switch turn off the heat for all the windows

On the B737 the 1L,1R & 2L,2R,4L,4R,5L,5R have seperate switches.Yes in case of arcing,it can be switched off.Depending on the Outside weather conditions,visability might be partially affected from that window until the Aircraft lands.

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 12):
If a windshield fails at altitude, it blows out, not in

Not on the B737.Its Installed from the Inside.

To revert to the B757 Windshield.The Pilot did the right thing & Window cracking is not a serious snag,can mostly be caused by faulty heat element in the Windshield or Faulty WHCU.
The Window replacement involves Removal,Replacement with Serviceable Windshield,Attach bolts Torqued in sequence with approprate torque.Resistance matching of Window to WHCU.Sealing of the outer window edges to Fuselage surface with PRC.Pressurisation check to detect leaks & after the necessary paperwork Of you go.

The Airport of Diversion could be regarding availability of spares if its not a critical snag.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3972 times:

Quoting TimT (Reply 13):
IMHO, a lower altitude would not hurt a thing

The DC8 MEL restricts operatons below 10000 ft to <250 knots due to the structural integrity of the window if window heat is inop. A little known side effect of window heat is that window heat also adds strength to the window. So, while a lower altitude is safer from a pressurization point of view, it MAY subject the window stresses that it can not handle in certain conditions.

By the way, I am aware of the 250 knot speed restriction below 10,000 ft.


User currently offlineJcrocker From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3952 times:

I thank all of you for your clarification of the situation I recently experienced. The information provided here has confirmed what my practical side has been telling me all along that this situation from a technical point of view isn't going to result in a catastrophic failure and once repaired we will back on our way without a worry. Unfortunately I think that myself and many of the other passengers fell victim to perception and ignorance thereby generating fear. IMHO I think that the flight attendant staff could have handled the situation in a more calm and transparent manner making the entire situation less stressful.

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
It's too bad you didn't have someone sitting near you who was a pilot or aircraft mechanic, etc, who could have explained to you that the jet was going to be fine & to just relax & enjoy the extra time above the clouds while the pro's in the cockpit took care of business.

Yes, this is exactly what I needed just to confirm what my practical side was saying and to prevent emotions from getting involved. Being a long time lover of flying I really should have been more relaxed and enjoyed the extra flight time...I will never take extra flight time for grated again  Wink

Quoting Mr Spaceman (Reply 7):
PS, aren't you glad you had the guts to get back onboard and continue with your trip? Were there any passengers who didn't get back onboard?

Absolutely! I would have had serious regrets not getting back on the aircraft. I know that at least 2 families did not get back on the aircraft following the repairs.

Speaking hypothetically now what would have happened if the windscreen in front of the FO had of blown out completely upon impact with frozen residue or upon failure of the WHCU resulting in the windscreen fracturing at cruising speed at 39,000ft? Would this have been a survivable incident?


User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1609 posts, RR: 52
Reply 17, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3935 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 14):
Not on the B737.Its Installed from the Inside.

No, it still blows out, not in. The cabin pressure on the inside is higher than the pressure on the outside. I participated in a blow out analysis of a 737 cockpit windshield for an armored cockpit door manufacturer.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14026 posts, RR: 62
Reply 18, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3924 times:

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 9):
Not in all circumstances does a cracked windshield require immediate replacement. I also do not have a MM (Maintenance Manual) in front of me, but they're made up of multiple 'plies', and cracking on the outer panes which are not considered structural is sometimes allowed.

IIRC, on the 757 there are two layers in each window, which can hold the whole pressure.

As could be seen in the pictures, the crack was right in the F/O's field of view. In such a case, it is not possible to defer the problem (as it is possible with small delaminations and bubbles outside the field of vision), so the plane would have been effectively grounded upon reaching HVN, unless they had a spare window (and a window heat controller, which I would change as well, just in case, because it could have caused a local overheating, which could have caused the crack) down there (which I doubt). For the airline it makes more sense to turn back to the home base, where there are the necessary spare parts in stock than having the plane stuck for several days in Cuba.

Jan


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3908 times:

Hi guys. Big grin

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 10):
DESCRIPTION
DELTA AIRLINES, DAL275, A BOEING B757, STRUCK FROZEN RESIDUE WHILE AT
FL340, DAMAGING THE WINDSHIELD, NO REPORTED INJURIES, LITTLE ROCK, AR

>> OPNLguy, Wow imagine that. Once again what are the odds? If it was "blue ice" that fell from another jet, you could almost say the B757 experienced a Brown Trout strike instead of a bird strike!  Silly

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 12):
If a windshield fails at altitude, it blows out, not in.

>> AeroWeanie, Thanks for pointing that out. That makes perfect sense of course, due to the pressurized cabin.

I was thinking of an incident where a windshield was damaged and a pilot's face was cut up by flying glass (thus my thoughts of the window blowing out into the cockpit), but now I forget the circumstances involved & believe it may even have happened on a ramp after a collision with another aircraft's wing or something.

Quoting TimT (Reply 13):
I'm a bit surprised the crew did an emergency descent- the Boeing COM manual has a section dedicated to a windscreen crack. As long as it's not bulging, it states continue flight.

>> TimT, according to Jcrocker's story, the pilots didn't appear (to me) to be acting as if they had an emergency situation right away because they asked the ..... "flight staff to standby for a conference call. Immediately following this conference call which lasted about 1.5-2 minutes the aircraft turned from a southerly heading to a northerly heading. Once the heading had been changed the pilot address the passengers stating only that there had been a mechanical failure aboard the aircraft and that we would be making an emergency landing and that once he knew where we would be landing he would advise all passengers. Less than 3 minutes after hearing from the pilot the aircraft made the steepest dive I had ever experienced on a commercial aircraft".

These actions would have taken over 5 minutes to achieve, so maybe the windscreen started bulging after the crew turned around, or the pilots didn't want to give it a chance to start, thus the emergency descent. I guess only that crew knows why they decided to dive.

I'm a bit surprised that the crew told the passengers about the cracked windscreen in the cockpit .... because that kind of detailed info could cause severe stress for some of the passengers (& I'm sure it did!). Then again, sometimes "Honesty Is The Best Policy", and it was up to the Captain to make that judgement call.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 14):
On the B737 the 1L,1R & 2L,2R,4L,4R,5L,5R have seperate switches.Yes in case of arcing,it can be switched off.Depending on the Outside weather conditions,visability might be partially affected from that window until the Aircraft lands.

>> HAWK21M, Thanks for your info about how the B737's cockpit windows are heated separately with separate switches. Why aren't windows 3L/3R heated? Are they eyebrow windows?

You can see the window heat switches on these 737-3 & 737-8 overhead panels (at the upper right). There's 2 switches per side for the forward & side windows.

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Marcel Moschner
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Werner Horvath



Quoting Air2gxs (Reply 15):
A little known side effect of window heat is that window heat also adds strength to the window. So, while a lower altitude is safer from a pressurization point of view, it MAY subject the window stresses that it can not handle in certain conditions.

>> Air2gxs, that's pretty neat info to learn about.

>> Jcrocker, .....I will never take extra flight time for granted again"  Wink

Yeah, that's how I would feel. Although it does depend on why you're getting extra time up there. There are many reasons why extra flying time wouldn't be welcomed with opened arms!  no  Just think of the Helios Airways 522 crash in Greece.

>> MD11Engineer .... "As could be seen in the pictures, the crack was right in the F/O's field of view. In such a case, it is not possible to defer the problem (as it is possible with small delaminations and bubbles outside the field of vision), so the plane would have been effectively grounded upon reaching HVN, unless they had a spare window"

>> MD11Engineer, Thanks for your info. It makes good sense that if both pilots can't see clearly, then the aircraft would be grounded until the needed repairs are completed.


Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3902 times:

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 17):
I participated in a blow out analysis of a 737 cockpit windshield for an armored cockpit door manufacturer.

Has this ever occured in service on a B737 before.Elobrate on the test pls.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineJcrocker From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3890 times:

Quoting AeroWeanie (Reply 12):
To quote the important part:
"The accident happened when the aircraft was climbing through 17,300 feet on departure from Birmingham. The left windscreen, which had been replaced prior to the flight, was blown out under effects of the cabin pressure when it overcame the retention of the securing bolts, 84 of which, out of a total of 90, were of smaller than specified diameter. The commander was sucked halfway out of the windscreen aperture and was restrained by cabin crew whilst the co-pilot flew the aircraft to a safe landing at Southampton Airport."

I just found some information on the National Geographic Channel website regarding this incident involving flight 5390. They are airing a 30 min program about the incident and ensuing investigation if anyone is interested. Take a look at http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au...etime=6%2F13%2F2005+1%3A30%3A00+PM for the dates and times.


User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1609 posts, RR: 52
Reply 22, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3814 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 20):
Has this ever occured in service on a B737 before.Elobrate on the test pls.

I am not aware of a 737 windshield blowing out, but the aircraft has to be designed to survive such an event.

Part of the FAA certification of the armored cockpit doors was proving that there were sufficient venting panels on the new doors that a windshield blowout would not cause the pressure loads on the cockpit bulkhead to go over the design value. The old doors relied on the door latch breaking to vent the pressure difference, but this was not acceptable on the new doors and they have panels that open to relieve the difference.


User currently offlineJcrocker From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (9 years 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3757 times:

Quoting Jcrocker (Reply 16):
Speaking hypothetically now what would have happened if the windscreen in front of the FO had of blown out completely upon impact with frozen residue or upon failure of the WHCU resulting in the windscreen fracturing at cruising speed at 39,000ft? Would this have been a survivable incident?

What do you guys think about the above scenario?


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 24, posted (9 years 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3653 times:

Quoting Jcrocker (Reply 23):

Presumingly the B757 Windshield has two layers sandwiching the Heater Element.
The chances of both shattering & breaking off from the frame would be very very difficult.
As soon as a crack is detected the descent commences depending on the severity of the situation.
I'd still say chances are rare.
BTW how is the B757 Windshield installed,similiar to the B737.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
25 Air2gxs : All flight deck windows on the B757 (B767) are installed from the outside. Pretty quick and simple compared to the older aircraft. Just bolts, no nut
26 HAWK21M : That makes the Torque sequence much more Important.Any occasion of Windshield blowout on the B757 ever. regds MEL
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Boeing 757 Windsheild Failure
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Boeing 757 Integral Airstairs posted Wed May 3 2006 18:14:03 by Cancidas
Boeing 757 Roll Oscillation posted Wed Mar 8 2006 11:39:13 by VASI
Actual Max Range Of A Boeing 757-200ER W/Winglets? posted Wed Feb 15 2006 14:43:56 by BrightCedars
Boeing 757-300 Gas Consumption posted Thu Aug 18 2005 17:22:48 by Fly707
Boeing 757 emergency exits question posted Sat Mar 26 2005 19:03:38 by Flydc10
Boeing 757 Wingspan Question (-200 Vs -300) posted Wed Nov 17 2004 10:12:56 by GKirk
Boeing 757/767 Trip Cost? posted Fri Jul 23 2004 17:30:16 by DfwRevolution
Boeing 757 High Profile posted Tue Sep 23 2003 04:17:33 by Tarzanboy
Boeing 757/767 Illuminating? posted Tue Sep 23 2003 03:48:42 by Tarzanboy
Boeing 757-200, Kissing The Ground? posted Sat Sep 20 2003 04:11:01 by Tarzanboy

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format