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Are Newly Built Aircraft Covered In Film?  
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5627 posts, RR: 32
Posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 2716 times:


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Photo © Gustavo Bertrán - Iberian Spotters



Why are newly built aircraft always a yellow/green colour? Is there a protective film coating the aluminium surface?

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2689 times:

It's just the primer coat. Good for preventing corrosion.


I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2676 times:

is it Zinc Chromate?

User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2679 times:

Actually I believe there are two possibilities.

First is zinc chromate which is used on most aircraft aluminum, inside where it doesn't show, mostly. It is green or yellow-green. In the photo below you can see some of it here in this wheel well:

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Photo © John Miller



Boeing also uses a spray on whitetails they are flying for test or other purposes. It looks a lot like zinc chromate and may include that compound but I belive it is more easily removed. When they are ready to deliver the plane it gets painted in customer's livery.

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But I would like to hear from a Boeing employee about this.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5627 posts, RR: 32
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2674 times:

Thanks guys. Makes sense.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2588 times:

The New Zinc Chromate Primer is Green & the Older one is Yellowish Green.
Apart from Corrosion Protection It also serves as a good bonding surface for Paint.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1724 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 2522 times:

Alodine?
IIRC - The skin sections used to arrived from Northrup that way.

Tod


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2449 times:

Actually....

Airbus uses a process in manufacturing called 'Bonded Primer'. This is a chemical treatment that is applied to the sheet stock aluminum before it is made into the skin panels and gives it that 'green look'. This is because European metal works company's do not use 'Alclad', which is a corrosion inhibitor. 'Bonded Primer' must not be removed or disturbed at anytime and is why you never see, with the exception of American's A300, a bare metal Airbus. The Bonded Primer is more clearly shown in this picture
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Photo © Pierre-Clément Got



Boeing uses 'Alclad' sheet stock, which can remain bare metal if the airline so chooses. There is a thin protective treatment applied to Alclad to prevent minor scratching and light corrosion before the painting or polishing process. This treatment is what gives the Boeing's that funky blue color when being built. It is normally removed with a special wash.

[Edited 2005-09-09 04:07:00]


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2445 times:

I seem to remember when American bought AirCal, they had to paint the BAe-146 aircraft gray when they put them in AA livery. It was supposedly because British Aerospace used aluminum that could not be polished out for some reason. I heard the little four-holer called the "pewter pumpkin" when the paint was stripped.

The Boeing green I've seen on some flight test aircraft is not this pale coating but an actual darker green. Anyone seen what I'm talking about?



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1724 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2389 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 8):
The Boeing green I've seen on some flight test aircraft is not this pale coating but an actual darker green. Anyone seen what I'm talking about?

Like the stuff in your reply 3?

That is what I was talking about. If I get time today, I'll try to take a look at a Boeing skin panel drawing and see if it's specified there.

Tod


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2390 times:

Quoting Tod (Reply 9):
Like the stuff in your reply 3?

No, as I recall darker even than Aer Lingus colors, but you could still see the metal and rivets etc. through it. Perhaps they don't use it anymore. Last time I saw it was on 767 fuselage number one which must have been more than twenty years ago.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
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