Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
How Do Airports Name Runways  
User currently offlineYegbey01 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1723 posts, RR: 3
Posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12370 times:

I was just thinking..hoe does an airport decide what to label a runways (15, 24...)

thanks

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBrokenrecord From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 772 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12363 times:

It is based on their direction in degrees.

I.E., Rwy. 15 is 150 degrees North-West. From the other direction, it would be Rwy. 33, at 330 degrees South-East.

If there are parallel runways, then the L or R designation is tacked on to indicate left or right.


User currently offlineZrs70 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 3112 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12354 times:

The numbers are compass headings:

11 = 110 degrees
18 = 180 degrees

If there are parallel runways, then you would see:
25L
25R

If there are more than two parallels, then one (set) will be off by a degree.

[Edited 2005-09-11 18:39:55]


14 year airliners.net vet! 2000-2013
User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2098 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12338 times:

Runways are named by their magnetic heading, and the last digit is dropped. For instance Runway 25 is on a magnetic heading of 250. That is also why the same runway, approached from the opposite direction will be 180' different. So at DAB here its runway 25 if approaching from the east, and the same runway is runway 7 if approaching from the west. 70 (Rnwy 7) +180 = 250(Rnwy 25).

If there is parallel runways, such as here at DAB, then you have 25L and 25R, or 25 left and 25 right, and its reciprical 7L and 7R.

If there is more than 2 parallel runways, then you get, for example, Runway 9L, 9C, 9R or 9 left, center and right.

Where some people get confused is a situation like Orlando where you have 4 or more parallels. MCO has 4 runways with a 18/36 heading, but are labelled as 18L, 18C, 18R and 17. They all share the same heading but starting with the 4th runway they will name it 10' off for clarities purpose.

And runway names will change occassionally. Magnetic north changes slightly over time, and so every so often the runways will be renamed to the correct value as it shifts.

Hope this helps.



Here Here for Severe Clear!
User currently offlineBrokenrecord From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 772 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12335 times:

Haven't we all just said basically the same thing? :-P

User currently offlineYegbey01 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1723 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12323 times:

Thanks guys! very helpful

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12316 times:

Quoting Zrs70 (Reply 2):
If there are more than two parallels, then one (set) will be off by a degree.



Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 3):
Where some people get confused is a situation like Orlando where you have 4 or more parallels. MCO has 4 runways with a 18/36 heading, but are labelled as 18L, 18C, 18R and 17

As HaveBlue says More than Three Parallel runways,not Two necessatite the 4th to be offset by one Degree in naming.Remember C is still an option.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineQantas744ER From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1286 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12312 times:

If you had 5 parallel runways you could just call them 9Left, 9Center Left, 9Center, 9Ceter Right, 9Right. LOL



Cheers Leo

[Edited 2005-09-11 19:12:03]


Happiness is V1 in Lagos
User currently offlineBrokenrecord From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 772 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 12297 times:

HAHA good thought Qantas...

I can imagine ATC at an airport with that setup would be a nightmare...


User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2098 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 12206 times:

Quoting Qantas744ER (Reply 7):
If you had 5 parallel runways you could just call them 9Left, 9Center Left, 9Center, 9Ceter Right, 9Right. LOL

It would be more like 9L, 9C, 9R, 8L and 8R.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 6):
offset by one Degree in naming.Remember C is still an option.

Not by one degree, but by 10 degrees. By one number maybe, as in 9 going to 8, but that represents 10 degrees, 90 to 80.



Here Here for Severe Clear!
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 12164 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 9):
Not by one degree, but by 10 degrees. By one number maybe, as in 9 going to 8, but that represents 10 degrees, 90 to 80.

Thats correct.
 bigthumbsup 
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9767 posts, RR: 27
Reply 11, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 12151 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

One should keep in mind, however, that though a 3rd parallel runway does not necessitate a different number, it is done anyway, especially in the case of airports with two distinct sets of runways that have the same heading. Examples:

LAX: 7L/25R, 7R/25L, 6L/25R, 6R/25L
DTW: 3L/21R, 3R/21L, 4L/22R, 4R/22L
PHX: 7L/25R, 7R/25L, 8/26
ATL: 8L/26R, 8R/26L, 9L/27R, 9R/27L (though with construction of another runway, I'm assuming there will be a 9L/27R, 9C/27C, and 9R/27L)
DEN: 16L/34R, 16R/34L, 17L/35R, 17R/35L

~Vik



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineJimpop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 12131 times:

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 11):
ATL: 8L/26R, 8R/26L, 9L/27R, 9R/27L (though with construction of another runway, I'm assuming there will be a 9L/27R, 9C/27C, and 9R/27L)

I was just wondering about this the other day. The new 5th runway in ATL is a bit of a distance from the 8/26 pair. I don't think it would make good sense to change 8R/26L to 8C/26C, just to re-establish 8R/26L as the new runway, as I think this would cause a bit of confusion (not that it doesn't exist already today  cheerful  Wink. Wouldn't this be a good reason for using 7/25?


User currently offlineTornado82 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 12091 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 9):

Not by one degree, but by 10 degrees. By one number maybe, as in 9 going to 8, but that represents 10 degrees, 90 to 80.

Why? You could put them at 86, and call those the 9L/R/C, and then at 84 and call them the 8L/R/C, right? 2 degrees of difference would be alot less problematic geographically/geometrically than 10.


User currently offlineBR076 From Netherlands, joined May 2005, 1086 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 12038 times:

Quoting Brokenrecord (Reply 4):
Haven't we all just said basically the same thing? :-P

It must have be something to do with your username Big grin



ú
User currently offlineATLAMT From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 240 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 12030 times:

Quoting Jimpop (Reply 12):
I was just wondering about this the other day. The new 5th runway in ATL is a bit of a distance from the 8/26 pair. I don't think it would make good sense to change 8R/26L to 8C/26C, just to re-establish 8R/26L as the new runway, as I think this would cause a bit of confusion (not that it doesn't exist already today cheerful Wink. Wouldn't this be a good reason for using 7/25?

The FAA allowed ATL to use 10/28 for the fifth runway. Left to right during an approach 10/28 makes the most sense. You've got 8L/R 9L/R 10 and 28 27L/R 26L/R.



Fwd to MCO and Placard
User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 12006 times:

Remember, there are other designations for runways aswell. E/W/N/S for the cardinal directions, G for glider, etc.

Feasibly, you could have 18W/36W, 18L/36R, 18C/36C, 18R/36L, 18E/36E.

At my local airport, we have two parallels, 8G/26G and 8/26. 8G/26G is a glider runway while 8/26 is the normal powered runway.


User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9767 posts, RR: 27
Reply 17, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 11940 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Flyf15 (Reply 16):
Remember, there are other designations for runways aswell. E/W/N/S for the cardinal directions, G for glider, etc

Interesting, I never knew that. SO E/W/N/S would designate the easternmost/westernmost/northernmost/southernmost runways? Or runways whose heading is directly east/west/north/south?

Meaning, would it be 9E/27W (due east/west), or 18E/36E (easternmost runway)?

Thanks,

~Vik



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2543 posts, RR: 24
Reply 18, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 11911 times:

Quoting Tornado82 (Reply 13):
Why? You could put them at 86, and call those the 9L/R/C, and then at 84 and call them the 8L/R/C, right? 2 degrees of difference would be alot less problematic geographically/geometrically than 10.

The runways aren't physically aligned on a different heading. Usually they will all have the same heading. It's only the runway designation which changes by one digit (10 degrees) either way. The approach plate will show the actual inbound heading to use to the nearest degree.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineTimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6772 posts, RR: 7
Reply 19, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 11903 times:

Quoting Flyf15 (Reply 16):
Remember, there are other designations for runways aswell. E/W/N/S for the cardinal directions, G for glider, etc.

Feasibly, you could have 18W/36W, 18L/36R, 18C/36C, 18R/36L, 18E/36E.

So does any airport use E/W or N/S instead of R/C/L?


User currently offlineLorM From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 409 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 11898 times:

ANC had an interesting runway number choice until this June or July. Previously the two parallels were 6L/24R 6R/24L, both with a 068 degree heading. The numbering was changed to 7L/25R 7R/25L. On one of the audio archives from the liveatc archives, a pilot asked the tower how the new runways were working out..... in jest of course.  Smile


Brick Windows
User currently offlineUnattendedBag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2323 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 11881 times:

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 11):
LAX: 7L/25R, 7R/25L, 6L/25R, 6R/25L

you sure about that? It should be 6L/24R and 6R/24L.



Slower traffic, keep right
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9767 posts, RR: 27
Reply 22, posted (8 years 10 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 11855 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting UnattendedBag (Reply 21):
you sure about that? It should be 6L/24R and 6R/24L.

Whoops, sorry about that. I thought I checked over all the runway numbers I typed, too. Oh well, thanks.

~Vik



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2420 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 11800 times:

LHR is one of the few recent examples where runways have had to be renumbered because of magnetic variation. They used to be angled 275/095 degrees, meaning they were numbered 28R/10L and 28L/10R. However due to magnetic variation the direction now is 274 degrees so they were renumbered.

http://www.airliners.net/discussions...eral_aviation/read.main/1832780/4/
Reply 13.



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2543 posts, RR: 24
Reply 24, posted (8 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11787 times:

Miami's runways were renumbered when the third parallel runway was added.

27L/09R became 27/09
27R/09L became 26L/08R

The new runway was designated 26R/08L

Not sure why they chose to designate the existing runways as they did, other than to ensure the two runways closest together (the new one and the old 27R/09L) had the same heading numbers.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
25 BuyantUkhaa : Well, everybody's talking about numbers, but the title says "naming" runways. To my knowledge, only AMS gives real names to its runways (Buitenveldert
26 ZRH : Yes, in Zurich the runways have names, I am not sure if they are official: 16-34 is "Blindlandepiste" (blind-landing-runway) because it was the runwa
27 Post contains images Bond007 : yes, and the question was .... Or didn't you actually read the question At least from an FAA standpoint anyway, runway naming implies the 'numbering'
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic How Do Airports Name Runways
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
How Do They Construct Runways So Straight? posted Sat Aug 20 2011 15:13:57 by AmericanAirFan
How Do Airlines Choose Diversion Airports posted Tue Apr 2 2013 12:09:27 by rwheele2
How Do They Count PAX (Airports/Airlines)? posted Sat Oct 8 2011 12:22:17 by B747forever
How Do Bizjets Get Slots At Major Airports? posted Fri Jun 27 2008 15:49:28 by QFA380
Why Do All 3 Major NYC Airports Have Runways 4/22? posted Fri Mar 30 2007 05:38:19 by CoolGuy
How Do Luggage Systems Work? posted Mon Mar 3 2014 15:58:38 by TriL1011star
United "Split Scimitar" Winglets - How Do They Work? posted Thu Feb 20 2014 10:33:10 by chicago757
How Do Airlines Gauge Ratio Of Entrees To Load? posted Sun Feb 9 2014 08:36:17 by AT
How Do Winglets Save Fuel? posted Fri Dec 6 2013 18:33:28 by DeltaXNA
How Do I Read This? posted Sun Sep 8 2013 12:12:25 by Grisee08

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format