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Test Flight True Or False?  
User currently offlineLastordu From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 367 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2690 times:

I don't know if this is true, but my Dad loves to tell a story that one day his flight was delayed do to some sort of mechanical problems (I don't know what that was, sorry.). His said that the pilot came out and tolled them that they would leave just after he did some tests. My Dad says that the pilot them went out to the runway and tookoff. The pilot came back and they boarded and the flight was fine? Is this true? Do they really do this kind of thing? If so want kind of thing do they do? Thanks for your time.


Thanks,
Nick


"Remember, Remember the 5th of November" from V for Vendetta
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2680 times:

These kinds of flights (what we call "test hops") are required after certain types of maintenance work are performed on the aircraft. This is by no means an all-inclusive list, but examples (on a 737) would be after a double engine change, or some work on the flight control system (including changing out surfaces, etc.). Some test hops require going up to normal cruising altitudes and switching off hydraulics and testing the manual reversion system. Other test hops are shorter in duration, like taking off, staying in the airport's traffic pattern, and then returning to land. Based upon what you've related, my best guess is that there was some flight control issue that may have involved flight control re-rigging, requiring a brief test hop once work was completed. Just a guess. It'd be unusal for a plane load of passengers to be waiting for the completion of a test hop, as in most cases, we'd just assign another aircraft, but then again, not all airlines have then readily available.

By the way, it's "told", not "tolled"...  Wink


User currently onlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6120 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2672 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 1):
By the way, it's "told", not "tolled"...

I'm sure they had to pay their fare somehow.  Wink



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2659 times:

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 2):
I'm sure they had to pay their fare somehow.

Maybe with a tolltag?  Wink


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2624 times:

Unless a Mx test/work requires an In Flight Test.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineNZ1 From Australia, joined May 2004, 2277 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2543 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

NZ had a spell last year where we doing this evry week. Not a biggie really.

NZ1


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2523 times:

Story sounds kind of 'fishy'. Test flights take a lot of planning and paperwork on the side of the airline and I doubt highly you could do one off the gate. I've personally released several planes out for a test flights and in most cases it takes a good hour just to make all the phone calls and get all the paperwork and fax's in order. In every case, the airlines Ops Manual requires a maintenance entry into the log book to release the plane for it's test flight.

It sounds to me like they just did a swap...

[Edited 2005-10-30 14:01:25]


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineVC10 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 1412 posts, RR: 15
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2511 times:

Depends what sort of test flight you are talking about, a performance test flight for " C of A" reasons takes a lot of planning, but a flight purely for a one off maintenance check can be done much quicker.
In the late 1960s a BOAC VC-10 in Africa suffered an engine starter motor failure and there was no spare. All passengers and Cabin Crew were disembarked and the aircraft did [ with approval] a 3 engined take off and then started the windmilling engine in flight. Landed loaded passengers / cabin crew and then off to Nairobi where the faulty starter was changed.

little vc10


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2502 times:

I've had to do any number of them over the years. Not that big a deal. It does take some time, but I don't recall the paperwork taking much longer than with any other writeup. Whatever permit required always seemed to be ready by the time they had the plane buttoned up anyway.

About half the time they seemed to happen at an out-station and we did the test flight and ferried to another city to place the plane back in service. In such cases the passengers had already departed on a later flight or on another carrier.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2498 times:

Quoting VC10 (Reply 7):

Interesting.Any added data/link available on that.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVC10 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 1412 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2484 times:

Hawk ,
I am sorry but there is no link for this other than in my head , and perhaps in some old dust covered manual on "what to do if this happens"

I suppose these sort of unofficial manuals are not used these days, but were quite common early in my career, as what with poor communications, compared to these days , a large route network and lack of spares, crews
[ when away from base] were expected to adapt/ modify or even invent procedures so as to get the aircraft back into the air.

I know a B747 tried a windmilling start at Bombay, however they tried it whilst doing a fast run down the runway. Result no start and aircraft off the end of the runway.

I have done one of these runway starts myself but that was on a piston/prop airliner and by positioning the blade pitch and some help from the infirm starter the engine was running by 60 kts and on a long runway that gives you plenty of room to coast to stop and get the engine oil warmed up

However that was all in a different age and things like that do not go on today-----or do they ??????


 devil 

little vc10


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 11, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2477 times:

Quoting VC10 (Reply 10):
I know a B747 tried a windmilling start at Bombay, however they tried it whilst doing a fast run down the runway. Result no start and aircraft off the end of the runway.

When was this.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVC10 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 1412 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 2434 times:

Hawk , From memory it was a BA classic 747 at Bombay and the year a bit harder for the old memory to pin point, but about 1985 to 87. Perhaps some one else can be knowledgeable as to the date

little vc10


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (9 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 2411 times:

Quoting VC10 (Reply 12):

Just can't find the records on that.Any link available.It was before I started off in Aviation,I was still in School/College then.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3087 posts, RR: 20
Reply 14, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2361 times:

Changine flight control doesn ot always need a flight test. You can change the elevator....flaps....spoilers....with out one. But you need a flight test for the primary... ie: the Alerons and Rudder. You also need it for a double engine change. Other than that most test flights tend to be when you are chasing an nagging recurrent snag / and / or company policy.

One time we called one because we had a spoiler float that we could not nail on the ground but in the air it was always written up.

Having said that we did not do them in between daily sked flights it was after the days flying was all over. There is a lot of work involved with a test flight. you do not just taxi out and do it from the gate. YOu dad probably say the ac leave the gate ans then a short time saw another aircraft from the company take off.

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineLastordu From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 367 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2340 times:

I just talk it over with my dad and he said that it was some sort of flight controls. I don't think that it was a swap because it was here at RDU. So I think that it would be faster just to do a test flight rather than wait for a nother plane. With that in mind I did ask him could it be a swap? He said no he talked to the pilot before and after.


Nick



"Remember, Remember the 5th of November" from V for Vendetta
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2339 times:

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 14):
You can change the elevator....flaps....spoilers....with out one. But you need a flight test for the primary... ie: the Alerons and Rudder.

The primary flight controls are the Elevator, Aileron and Rudder. Pitch, Roll and Yaw control. All others are secondary controls.

Most modern airliners have hydraulic powered flight controls. The actual surface can be change without disturbing the rigging. Therefore, no special tests are required after a control surface is removed and replaced, other than a surface travel check to insure there is no rubbing or binding.


User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3087 posts, RR: 20
Reply 17, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2330 times:

I am only speaking for here in Canada. And here we HAVE to test fly if an Aleron or Rudder is changed, Hydraulic or not (Atleast on B727 and 737, which is what my experience is on experience on). However, we do not have to test fly for any other flight control including elevator.

In most cases it takes multiple hours to change flight controls so I stand by the your Dad is mistaken.

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
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