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Lines On Top Of The Door  
User currently offlineKaitak744 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2368 posts, RR: 3
Posted (8 years 10 months 3 days ago) and read 4469 times:

Does anyone know what these lines are on top of each door? They all seem to at a different angle, and are present on almost all aircraft.


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19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 3 days ago) and read 4462 times:

They are just rain gutters that prevent rain water from getting in the door ways when the doors are open...

[Edited 2005-10-31 02:20:44]


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21564 posts, RR: 55
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 4406 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 1):
They are just rain gutters that prevent rain water from getting in the door ways when the doors are open...

 checkmark 

Not too much of an issue when using a jetway to board, but it makes a big difference when you're using open stairs.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineChiGB1973 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 1615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 4405 times:

Makes a big difference with a jet bridge at many places. At TZ, I noticed it kept a lot of water out. They are not an exact fit in most places. Of course, could have been the bridge operator too.

M


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 4372 times:

Quoting Mir (Reply 2):
Not too much of an issue when using a jetway to board

Not really true as jetways do not offer a rain tight seal.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineJsposaune From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 291 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4294 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 1):
They are just rain gutters that prevent rain water from getting in the door ways when the doors are open...

Correct, but more specifically, they prevent de-icing fluid from running down over the doors. Type I deicing fluid, heated to upwards of 170 degrees will damage door seals. De-icers are trained to spray the top of the fuselage, not directly at the door. Those little ridges will deflect the fluid away from the sensitive areas.

Hope that helps...
(first a.net post, by the way...hello, everybody!)



There are no stupid questions....only stupid people!!!
User currently offlineKaitak744 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2368 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4267 times:

Yup! thanks, that surely helped.

Quoting Jsposaune (Reply 5):
(first a.net post, by the way...hello, everybody!)

Welcome aboard!


User currently offlineLegendDC9 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4198 times:

Quoting Jsposaune (Reply 5):
De-icers are trained to spray the top of the fuselage, not directly at the door.

HA! That has to be one of the most optimistic comments regarding airport training I have ever heard. I would say I have seen it closer to: Here, deice this and keep it away from your nose and mouth.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4076 times:

Quoting Jsposaune (Reply 5):
first a.net post, by the way...hello, everybody

Welcome.
Amazing what a single piece of metal can achieve.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineJsposaune From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 291 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3992 times:

Quoting LegendDC9 (Reply 7):
Here, deice this and keep it away from your nose and mouth.

Hehe...I seem to remember my training a few years back...it included the question "um...you're not afraid of heights, are you?!?!"

Heck..a little type 1 never hurt anybody, as long as you don't make cocktails with it!!!



There are no stupid questions....only stupid people!!!
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12135 posts, RR: 51
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3981 times:

Quoting Jsposaune (Reply 5):
Quoting EMBQA (Reply 1):
They are just rain gutters that prevent rain water from getting in the door ways when the doors are open...

Correct, but more specifically, they prevent de-icing fluid from running down over the doors. Type I deicing fluid, heated to upwards of 170 degrees will damage door seals. De-icers are trained to spray the top of the fuselage, not directly at the door. Those little ridges will deflect the fluid away from the sensitive areas.

Hope that helps...
(first a.net post, by the way...hello, everybody!)

That is correct, and welcome aboard.

Quoting ChiGB1973 (Reply 3):
Makes a big difference with a jet bridge at many places. At TZ, I noticed it kept a lot of water out. They are not an exact fit in most places. Of course, could have been the bridge operator too.

The jet bridge awning will also collect rain water, but often is not sealed against the aircraft, thus the gutters still are useful.


User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4057 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3928 times:

On the picture of that ANA plane you can clearly see the imprints where the jetway sits against the aircraft. Very strange, the jetway must be filthy.

User currently offlinePositiverate From United States of America, joined May 2005, 1590 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3884 times:

One addendum: I have been told that the gutters are positioned at the angle the airflow goes over the airframe at that point. Thusly, they provide minimal if no drag.

User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (8 years 10 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3820 times:
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Quoting Positiverate (Reply 12):
One addendum: I have been told that the gutters are positioned at the angle the airflow goes over the airframe at that point. Thusly, they provide minimal if no drag.

Not sure about that, if you look closely at some aircraft you will see they angle in both directions over different doors.



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3728 times:

Quoting Positiverate (Reply 12):
I have been told that the gutters are positioned at the angle the airflow goes over the airframe at that point. Thusly, they provide minimal if no drag

Its more to do with the Aircraft Pitch on Ground & the Fuselage surface.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3658 times:

On the early L-1011's the rain gutters over the two forward doors were parallel with the top of the door. At some point (I don't know where) they were installed at an angle, with the front being lower than the back. This was done to improve drainage.

User currently offlineOldAeroGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 3502 posts, RR: 66
Reply 16, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3634 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 14):
Its more to do with the Aircraft Pitch on Ground & the Fuselage surface.

No, it really is a reflection of the local surface streamlines in cruising flight.



Airplane design is easy, the difficulty is getting them to fly - Barnes Wallis
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 17, posted (8 years 10 months 20 hours ago) and read 3480 times:


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Quoting OldAeroGuy (Reply 16):
No, it really is a reflection of the local surface streamlines in cruising flight.

I still feel its required while on Ground & not in Flight.For Eg Take the B737 Fwd Door Gutters.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineCCA From Hong Kong, joined Oct 2002, 831 posts, RR: 14
Reply 18, posted (8 years 10 months 14 hours ago) and read 3452 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 17):
I still feel its required while on Ground & not in Flight.For Eg Take the B737 Fwd Door Gutters.
regds

Exactly, it is inline with the local airflow in flight, just ask yourself where are A/C designed to be for the majority of their life on the ground or in flight?

The 747 is the perfect example to show the local airflow in flight. Door 1 from the minimal effect over the nose, Door 2 from the bow wave of the wing, Door 3 inline with the air flow over the wing, Door 4 as the flow evens out and Door 5 is even set up for the bow wave flow for the stabilizer. Even the main deck cargo door and it's negative pressure relief valve doors are done.

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You can see the local airflow dirt marks here.

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KLM seemed to have the perfect shots  Smile

Rgds CCA



C152 G115 TB10 CAP10 SR-22 Be76 PA-34 NDN-1T C500 A330-300 A340-300 -600 B747-200F -200SF -400 -400F -400BCF -400ERF -8F
User currently offlineLongbowPilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 577 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (8 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3325 times:
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Quoting LegendDC9 (Reply 7):
HA! That has to be one of the most optimistic comments regarding airport training I have ever heard. I would say I have seen it closer to: Here, deice this and keep it away from your nose and mouth.

Maybe that is the way they do it in your country.


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