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Garmin G1000 On C172  
User currently offlineUnited737522 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 2258 times:

Hey everyone,

I don't post here often, but may be you can help me. I have the chance to take a class to learn the new G1000 glass panel displays. Our flight club is getting 3 new 172s with these avionics next week. Can anyone tell me what the big deal is between the standard king avionics and the G1000 besides the glass panel? Why is it that I have to take a class before piloting the new aircraft, and is it even worth going for?

Thanks so much!

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJoness0154 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 667 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2248 times:

Quoting United737522 (Thread starter):
Hey everyone,

I don't post here often, but may be you can help me. I have the chance to take a class to learn the new G1000 glass panel displays. Our flight club is getting 3 new 172s with these avionics next week. Can anyone tell me what the big deal is between the standard king avionics and the G1000 besides the glass panel? Why is it that I have to take a class before piloting the new aircraft, and is it even worth going for?

Thanks so much!

The glass cockpit is pretty much a totally different system than vacuum instruments.
The reason you have to take the class is because you can't just hop in the G1000 and expect to know how to operate it and set it up, tune the radio's, etc since its all integrated into 2 screens instead of seperate modules.
You'll learn what to do when you have an electrical failure, etc. The procedure is different in a glass cockpit airplane with regards to resetting everything, etc.
The first time you fly on instruments in a glass cockpit, it'll be nothing like using the standard 6 pack.



I don't have an attitude problem. You have a perception problem
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3139 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2233 times:

The G1000 has a TON of features that can be used but they take time to learn. I would highly advise taking the class.

There is a ton of difference in logic between Garmin and King's GPS models and this alone could justify a class. The G1000 has "soft keys" who's functions change based on the mode you're in. It even takes a few minutes to learn how the radios tune but once you do it's very intuitive. There are also issues with learning how the system function works should a screen fail.

I personally think that flight schools should teach students how to properly use whatever GPS may be in the cockpit. There are a ton of features in most of them that people don't know how to use and have no idea of what the unit does beyond the direct button.



DMI
User currently offlineJoness0154 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 667 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2229 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 2):
I personally think that flight schools should teach students how to properly use whatever GPS may be in the cockpit. There are a ton of features in most of them that people don't know how to use and have no idea of what the unit does beyond the direct button.

Agreed 100%. GPS is one of the best situational awareness tools there is. When I was working on my instrument rating, my instructor told me to load EVERY waypoint and approach into the GPS, even ILS and VOR approaches. The reason is SA. When doing DME arcs and whatnot, having the localizer line displayed on the GPS helps when turning in to intercept the actual localizer.

Also, I was taught to use the autopilot whenever possible, as it lightens pilot workload.

By using both of those pieces of (highly) underused equipment as much as possible, I found that it lightened my single pilot IFR workload drastically while maintaining a higher level of safety and awareness. I impressed my checkride examiner quite well.

Anyways, don't just expect to hop into a G1000 cockpit and know everything. The class is there to teach you how to use the systems properly and I would highly recommend it, otherwise you'll find yourself in trouble quite quickly



I don't have an attitude problem. You have a perception problem
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3139 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2217 times:

Quoting Joness0154 (Reply 3):
Also, I was taught to use the autopilot whenever possible, as it lightens pilot workload.

By using both of those pieces of (highly) underused equipment as much as possible, I found that it lightened my single pilot IFR workload drastically while maintaining a higher level of safety and awareness. I impressed my checkride examiner quite well.

I should add this disclamer to my previous statements:

Be very careful in how you view this. Having your head down punching buttons can often destroy your situational awareness more than helping. It's a double edge sword and you need to find a fine line between workload reduction, and increased situational awareness. I do like how you said "whenever possible" though!

Always remember, FLY THE AIRPLANE FIRST!!



DMI
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31573 posts, RR: 57
Reply 5, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2216 times:

An Opportunity to learn should never be lost.


LINK

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineJoness0154 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 667 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2204 times:

Quoting Pilotpip (Reply 4):
Be very careful in how you view this. Having your head down punching buttons can often destroy your situational awareness more than helping. It's a double edge sword and you need to find a fine line between workload reduction, and increased situational awareness. I do like how you said "whenever possible" though!

Yes yes, in fact I was more speaking across the lines of flying IFR, where you really don't have your head outside the cockpit much anyway. I only saw outside once on my IFR checkride. My checkride examiner made me do a 0-0 takeoff with the hood, but it was nice to have a 150 foot wide runway at DAB for it  Smile

Anyways, yes, if I'm just flying VFR, the 'direct' button will work for me, but if I'm IFR you'll see me doing the things above. Always keep your head outside the plane flying VFR!



I don't have an attitude problem. You have a perception problem
User currently offlineCrjonBeez From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 317 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2105 times:

Quoting Joness0154 (Reply 3):
Anyways, don't just expect to hop into a G1000 cockpit and know everything. The class is there to teach you how to use the systems properly and I would highly recommend it, otherwise you'll find yourself in trouble quite quickly

here! here! i've spent several hours playing with the garmin system and it's mind boggling how much you need to learn in order to properly take advantage of the technology in the system.

i would definitely suggest taking a class if possible. wandering around osh kosh this summer, EVERYBODY is pushing the G1000, especially mooney and cessna.


User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3139 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2093 times:

And Beechcraft, and Diamond. Columbia even offers a choice of the Avidyne or Garmin. Pretty soon every GA aircraft out there is going to come equipped with the G1000 or the FlightMax system. It's not that far off right now.


DMI
User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 13
Reply 9, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1994 times:

Take the class. I had an instrument student for a brief time who owned a Cirrus with the Avidyne (sp?) system, looked very similar to the G1000. Couldn't figure out what I was looking at for the life of me. Needless to say, I was really missing the steam gauges.



FSP


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 8643 posts, RR: 75
Reply 10, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1961 times:

I think any pilot would be foolish to not take such a class.

Glass cockpit, with digital airspeed and altimeter information is not that easy to transition to, pilots tend to get caught up in the accuracy of the information presented, and unable to correctly pick up trend changes.

This sort of equipment has many features, always try and keep you displays clean, don’t clutter up you displays, keep the selected scale sensible for phase of flight your in.

Know the features by memory that will help you in an emergency, direct to nearest airport etc. Use the technology to improve your situational awareness, terrain, aircraft, airspace, nearest airport, radio frequencies.

Don’t forget you basic flying skills, look outside, and use the technology to back up your visual navigation, don’t become an automation monkey.

Don’t use the technology to fly in conditions beyond you capabilities, assume it will fail at the most inappropriate time.

My advice for you is go to the class, and know that its still a 172, the pitch, power, and attitudes that you know from looking outside are more important than the new electronic equipment in the cockpit.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineBoeing Nut From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1936 times:

G1000 references.

I'm asking for just the DVD for Christmas even though I am not currently flying.


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