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How High Can A 747 Fly?  
User currently offlineFLLDTW744 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 23 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Hey guys, just a quick simple question....how high can a 747 fly?


-for all of you high school students- Why try 100% when you can try 90% and still get an A?
121 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMD11LuxuryLinr From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1385 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting FLLDTW744 (Thread starter):
how high can a 747 fly?

Which one?



Caution wake turbulence, you are following a heavy jet.
User currently offlineFLLDTW744 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 23 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

a 747-400...whats the altitude limit


-for all of you high school students- Why try 100% when you can try 90% and still get an A?
User currently offlineUNDBoeingNut From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

I would assume it would be between 45,000 and 60,000 feet, but this is speculation because I am sure that it depends heavily at those altitudes on OAT, density altitude, pressure altitude, weight, etc... All aircraft performance variables. Hope that helps...most places I looked at say that it is unknown...I wouldn't really wanna be the one that tries to get this bird to go as high as it can then just to guess what it does when it loses speed and stalls out at the top... Wink


AE
User currently offlineAntiuser From Italy, joined May 2004, 657 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

If I recall correctly, the service ceiling of the B744 is FL410 (41.000 ft), but of course that depends on weather/environmental characteristics.


Azzurri Campioni del Mondo!
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting FLLDTW744 (Reply 2):
a 747-400...whats the altitude limit

Certificated ceiling is 45,100'. Won't do it after a MTOW takeoff.


User currently offlineUNDBoeingNut From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

I did a quick check and a few different websites listed the service ceiling at 41,000 and another few at 45,000...take your pick couldn't find anything on Boeing.com but I occationally have to root around for things on that website....anyway


AE
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

I only have about 8000 hours PIC on the 400, so I'd think my response should just about cover the answer.

User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

I thought I heard somewhere that when a 744 is at MTOW, it usually can't climb beyond 35,000 until they start burning off that fuel....

User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

I've heard of 747-SPs that topped 51,000 feet, high enough to provoke problems of fuel freezing in the wing tanks.

User currently offlineSevenheavy From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 1153 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting GQfluffy (Reply 8):
thought I heard somewhere that when a 744 is at MTOW, it usually can't climb beyond 35,000 until they start burning off that fuel....

If a B744 is opertating at MTOW its optimum initial cruise altiude is more likely to be in the region of FL290-330, depending on conditions. The aircraft will then step climb as it burns off fuel/weight.

Bear in mind that at any weight the aircraft will have a "maximum" and "optimum" cruise altitude.

In "normal" passenger operations you would be very unlikely to fly higher than around FL410, although very rarely up to FL430 is used if conditions permit.

This is just some addiotional information. As PhilSquares stated the actual maximum certified altitude is 45,100ft.

Regards



So long 701, it was nice knowing you.
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

I don't believe it's in service anymore by any major airlines, but the 747SP cruised at FL550 to FL600. It was designed to fly at those altitudes and achieved it's performance specs. by doing so. Much longer range as a result.

User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

Wow! FL600! That's pretty high up.

A certain converted airliner has been used to launch rockets into space, serving as a "first stage", so to speak. If the 747 can get up to FL600, I should think that it would be a pretty good first stage for a rocket. I don't remember if the converted airliner was a 747, though.


User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 32767 times:

Don't hold me to FL600 on the SP...I thought it could cruise that high, but the more I think about it, it was probably closer to FL540 or 550.

Concorde on the other hand easily did FL550-FL600, but of course we're talkinb about a completely different airframe and powerplant.


User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 13):
Don't hold me to FL600 on the SP...I thought it could cruise that high, but the more I think about it, it was probably closer to FL540 or 550.

No problem. It did sound a bit high, since I've always thought of airliner altitudes as around FL300 to FL400. In fact, I've always been impressed by the USAF F-15's max ceiling, which is around 60K ft., as I recall.

BTW, the F-15 has also been used as an A-Sat (anti-satellite missile) platform.

I guess the only more impressive aircraft (besides the X-15 and similar aircraft) from the standpoint of altitude would be the USAF (Lockheed) SR-71 Blackbird, which basically goes to near-space. (Although, I do remember reading that a Soviet-era interceptor (MiG-25 Foxbat, I think) could reach up to 100K ft., which isn't shabby, either.)

[Edited 2005-12-23 07:49:58]

[Edited 2005-12-23 07:56:48]

User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 14):
I guess the only more impressive aircraft (besides the X-15 and similar aircraft) from the standpoint of altitude would be the USAF (Lockheed) SR-71 Blackbird, which basically goes to near-space

Don't know about the LA area, but if you're ever in the Portland (PDX) area, be sure to check out the Evergreen Air Museum on Hwy. 18 in McMinnville, about an hour southwest of the city. They have an SR-71 there that you can walk around. THAT is an amazing airplane, bar none. That airplane alone probably is on the top #3 list for reasons we won the Cold War.


User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 15):
They have an SR-71 there that you can walk around. THAT is an amazing airplane, bar none. That airplane alone probably is on the top #3 list for reasons we won the Cold War.

The Blackbird is like something out of Star Wars! In fact, Star Wars might have been influenced by its radical design.

Heck, if the Skunk Works could have built the Blackbird in secret, maybe those rumors about a Mach 6 Aurora are true. Who knows?

Thanks for the tip concerning the museum! Sounds great.

Still, as a civvie, I'm much more likely to fly in a Triple 777, a 747, or even an Airbus than an SR-71.  Wink

Which raises the question -- I wonder if, ten or fifteen years from now, if/when we develop the next SST, we'll finally be able to reach near-space as passengers. They keep on talking about hypersonic passenger vehicles, but it seems that, constantly, it's nothing but talk.

Oh well.


User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16976 posts, RR: 67
Reply 17, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 16):
Heck, if the Skunk Works could have built the Blackbird in secret, maybe those rumors about a Mach 6 Aurora are true. Who knows?

Going way OT here. Anyway I'm all for Aurora being possible, but I just wonder where they would hide the cost. It's one thing saying "black" in the budget, it's quite another hiding the kind of sums we would probably be talking.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Related question: I know it could be classified, but maybe it's not. At what altitude can a VC-25A cruise (if necessary)?


View Large View Medium
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Photo © Kevin Van Bunnen - Brussels Aviation Photography



Mark


User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 11):
I don't believe it's in service anymore by any major airlines, but the 747SP cruised at FL550 to FL600

Not even close! I have about 500 hours in the SP and can't remember what it's ceiling was, but that wasn't it! IIRC, it was 45100 too, but don't hold me to that.

Someone mentioned fuel freezing. Actually, it's a occurance in all the 747s.


User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 14):
BTW, the F-15 has also been used as an A-Sat (anti-satellite missile) platform.

The Eagle can "zoom climb" to 90,000 ft plus....


User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 21, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

According to the B747 Type Certificate Data Sheet the maximum altitude for all models is 45,100 feet.

User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16976 posts, RR: 67
Reply 22, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 18):
Related question: I know it could be classified, but maybe it's not. At what altitude can a VC-25A cruise (if necessary)?

I'm gonna go with 45100 feet. Is there really a point in going higher? You're higher than ground based SAMs anyway. Also, you can't escape from AA missiles since all the interceptors can fly way higher, fly faster and turn tighter. So there's no point going to 55000 or whatever. Might as well fly the same profile as the civilian variants.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineDw747400 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 1257 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 18):
Related question: I know it could be classified, but maybe it's not. At what altitude can a VC-25A cruise (if necessary)?

The E-4Bs can apparently climb to well over 50,000 feet, and have done so in service though it is not typical. I'd imagine VC-25A physically could do the same, but I've never heard anything specific about it.



CFI--Certfied Freakin Idiot
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (8 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Dw747400 (Reply 23):
The E-4Bs can apparently climb to well over 50,000 feet

I rather doubt that! The empty weight of the aircraft is a good 100,000 lbs. heavier than the 747-200B. So, unless it had virutally no fuel, it's not going to get that high.


25 KDTWflyer : Slightly off topic.... but.. the air breathing altitude champ, the MIG-25. Altitude: 123,523 ft. (37,650 meters) Aircraft: E-266M ) (Mig-25) Pilot: Al
26 HaveBlue : The MiG-25, while able to attain altitudes of over 100,000', could do so only in a zoom climb profile, it could not maintain that altitude. The SR-71
27 Post contains images WILCO737 : Hello guys, I must say it is really funny that people doubt the answer of a pilot of the 747-400 with 8000 PIC on it! I am flying 737s and it is funny
28 Post contains images Jush : You didn't win! Regds jush By the way isn't there a funny joke about the blackbird? Blackbird: Request FL600 ATC: If you can climb that high your req
29 Post contains links and images LeanOfPeak : View Large View MediumPhoto © Scott Carmichael
30 Post contains links and images September11 : even better View Large View MediumPhoto © Joe Corrigan
31 Post contains images WILCO737 : well, Concorde, yes, but quesion: are the engines of the Concorde comparable to the engines of a lets say 744? Answer: no they are not! And the profil
32 Mir : I have been on a Learjet 23 at FL510... -Mir
33 Post contains images Matt72033 : he said FL550-6000
34 Mir : I know, but FL510 is kind of close. -Mir
35 Dw747400 : I'm have nowhere near your background with the 747 (obviously!) so I'm not going to try and argue this is a fact. However, the 50,000+ number came fr
36 PhilSquares : I'm telling you it's an aerodynamic impossibility! There is no way the E4 can make it to that altitude. The empty weight of the aircraft os over 100,
37 Post contains links Molykote : Among parameters that matter to the operation of an aircraft FL510 is quite a different world than 55k-60k. Edit: http://www.pdas.com/e2.htm Standard
38 Lehpron : B-52 Stratofortress' were capable of cruising at FL680. While flying higher is better for the engine, is there a danger of UV rays when flying too hig
39 Mir : Quite a range of information there, but unfortunately I have no idea what it means. Any explanations? -Mir
40 Matt72033 : alt is altitude in thousands of feet. sigma is density divided by sea-level density. delta is pressure divided by sea-level pressure. theta is temper
41 AerospaceFan : 90K ft. for an F-15? That's pretty awesome. As is 123K for the MiG-25. Still, have a soft spot for the SR-71 (and who doesn't?), not to mention the X-
42 Starlionblue : Hmmm, but the X-15 cheats! The thing needs to take off and land under it's own power, wouldn't you say? In related trivia, under FAI criteria, Yuri G
43 SkySurfer : Not to nitpick or anything, but the highest altitude reached by an F-15 was 103K feet back in '75. Obviously it was a high speed climb from low level.
44 Post contains images LeanOfPeak : Far more relevant than that is that the X-15 is a rocket.
45 Post contains links EMBQA : You are correct Sir... http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory...c4862570130061c913/$FILE/A20WE.pdf[Edited 2005-12-27 01:06:14]
46 Post contains images Starlionblue : Oh yes indeed. Non-airbreathing. But then again the X-15 is a winged craft... On the other hand even capsules like Apollo generate some lift. The arg
47 Gigneil : One of the main reasons Concorde had turbojets rather than fans... the need to cruise at up to FL650. N
48 Molykote : A "quick simple question" that PhilSquares answered in Reply 7... Half the fun of a.net is seeing where these threads end up!
49 CON207 : Here's one for you just whilst we are on this subject... What was the maximum ceiling of the 747SP? Sue
50 474218 : As I stated in Reply 29 the maximum altitude for all models of the B747 is 45,100 feet.
51 Tom12 : aerosite.net claims that the ceiling for the SP is only 390 Thoams
52 474218 : Page 9 of the Boeing 747 Type Certificate Data Sheet states "maximum operational altitude 45,100 feet", aeroite.net is incorrect. http//:www.aftd.com
53 JayinKitsap : I would think there are several controlling variables, I probably missed several. Temperature at altitude - freezing of liquids, brittle fracture of m
54 MD-90 : I would think that the highest altitude commercial jets have ever been certified to is 51,000 feet (Concorde/Tu-144 aside). Only a very few business
55 Post contains images Lehpron : From what I hear, the YF-12 outperform even that. There are several models that came out of that program, but the highest speed and altitude I have e
56 Post contains images BEG2IAH : Moon, Mars and beyond... BEG2IAH
57 HAWK21M : Wasn't the YF-12 set the trend for the SR-71 Programme. regds MEL
58 MD-90 : The YF-12 became the A-12, which was the designation for the CIA's fleet. It was superior to the SR-71 because it only held one crewmember, had a high
59 Post contains images HAWK21M : YF-12 SR-71 Both look very Similiar.Apart from the nose. regds MEL
60 Andz : I've personally been on the flight deck of an SP that went to FL410. This was on a scheduled flight that departed from 5,500ft elevation and landed a
61 Phollingsworth : I shall chime in to, hopefully, add some clarification. There are basically three types of "ceilings" (others do exist but are not nearly as meaningfu
62 PhilSquares : Actually, at 45100, you won't be at the differential limit. The 45100 is based on the ability of the aircraft to do an emergency descent to 14,000 in
63 Post contains images 2H4 : Wait a minute...wasn't there a past thread about a large number of birds flying in the cabin of an airborne airliner that might refute this? 2H4
64 HaveBlue : The A-12 was first. There was also the M-12 mothership, an A-12 with a D-21 Mach 3+ drone on its back. That program was cancelled after a mid air col
65 Phollingsworth : All I was saying is that the 41,500 is a certification, not absolute performance ceiling. This means that is could be, by definition, either max diff
66 Post contains images HaveBlue : True, depending on the source. When I was reading a quite in depth book or article on the Blackbirds it mentioned that both the M-12 and M-21 have be
67 Post contains links HaveBlue : Here it is, from one source: Two of the A-12's were modified to carry the D-21 ramjet reconnaissance drone on top of the aft fuselage. The 42 foot tit
68 474218 : There were two (2) factory built SR-71B trainers, they were 61-17956 and 61-17957. 61-17957 crashed just short of the runway at Beale AFB on 11 Janua
69 2H4 : FWIW, 61-17956 is on display at the Kalamazoo Air Zoo in Kalamazoo, Michigan. 2H4
70 LeanOfPeak : Cycles. Overbuilding the components that carry pressurization loads allows a greater number of cycles between inspections and repairs. Depending on h
71 PhilSquares : 1) Not to nit pick, but it's 45,100. 2) Why would want to be at max diff at 45100? Now you have no room for error should there be an altitude excursi
72 Post contains links Phollingsworth : Thanks, after typing it a lot I finally transposed the numbers. This makes sense when you are unsure of the performance of the materials and structur
73 Cedarjet : No it didn't. There's no way. OK, first of all, the 747 classics only go to level 450. As well as not being able to make it aerodynamically, there's
74 MNeo : When you take into account that military jets with a higher thrust to wieght ration than the concorde can bearly do FL1000, i really dont think that
75 HaveBlue : The only plane that could ever cruise at FL1000 was the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird and its sister blackbirds (A-12, YF-12). And only a couple of top li
76 Post contains images NW727251ADV : Another off topic aircraft but I'm surprised no one mentioned the American XB-70 Valkyrie...by far much cooler than the SR-71 (even though I love the
77 xaapb : Well I do asume max cervice ceiling is FL451, just saw on FlightRadar a Cargolux descending out of FL450.
78 Fabo : wtf necrothread revival. How much is the record? I think this does not break it, but comes close. last post before reviving 8 years 2 weeks 4 days 14
79 PGNCS : 45,100 is correct for the B-744. I don't know about the 748, but would expect it to be similar. It would have to be quite light to be close to that al
80 Viscount724 : How did you find such an old thread in order to reply to it? When people reactivate old threads such as this I think it would be courteous to mention
81 LH707330 : I think the 748 is 43k because it has a tougher time getting down from there.
82 Post contains images DocLightning : Given that the U2 topped out at about FL700, I doubt a 74SP could do FL600. Psh. You're just a 744 pilot. What would you know? The only remaining exa
83 Max Q : It is an old thread, great shame we don't see Phil Squares and many other professional Pilots of his experience on this forum anymore.
84 PGNCS : Indeed. I know why he (and others) left and understand it completely, but their expertise and depth of knowledge were so useful.
85 strfyr51 : What the airplane CAN Do and what it is certificated at are 2 different things, FL410 is as high as any USA passenger air plane can take revenue passe
86 francoflier : Yes, the 747-8 is certified to 43,100 ft. The new wing is indeed slicker and it can't descend from 45,100 fast enough in a depressurization scenario.
87 Max Q : That is completely incorrect. Plenty of US Carriers on regular service carrying revenue passengers have operated and still do operate above FL410 rou
88 BravoOne : A quick look at the B747-400 FCOM would confirm 45,100 is the max altitude for this aircraft. Along those same lines the 757-200 is 42,000 while the 7
89 LH707330 : It was officially 45,100 as were the rest, but you could probably take them higher, I know the SOFIA lab goes up pretty high.
90 seabosdca : There are a lot of rumors floating around out there, of dubious validity, of E-4Bs hanging around up at 51,000. I'm very skeptical that anyone has eve
91 PGNCS : That is not correct. Max Q is wholly correct, and I too have been above FL 410 in a 757 and 767 with passengers in the back. I have also been told th
92 Viscount724 : And 42,100 ft. for the 747-8F.
93 francoflier : It was, until a modification of the flight control system software allowed it to be increased to 43,100 ft. So both the -8i and -8f are now certified
94 Western727 : Why was this the case, out of curiosity? And what was the nature of the software mod Francoflier mentions?
95 Caryjack : Which is what I did...until I came upon some lost posters. This isn't lost on me. In a selfish reflection, I should have added him to my RR list. It'
96 strfyr51 : What USA airline and what flight??
97 strfyr51 : I'd REALLY be interested in what the flight was Filed for, I lookk at flight plans a LOT and I've Never seen a flight filed for anything above FL410,
98 BravoOne : I have seen that statement in a Flight Deck pub from Boeing. Believe me Boeing takes a minimalistic approach at what they publish for general consump
99 PGNCS : First off, read what I wrote. You said this: That is incorrect. You did not put any conditions on your absolute statement that "FL410 is as high as a
100 Post contains links PGNCS : Feel free also to peruse this thread: B744 Cruising At FL430. Highest Ive Seen One. (by trnswrld Oct 16 2013 in Civil Aviation)
101 Post contains images HaveBlue : Thanks for your input PGNCS, some of us appreciate it My best friend flies 747's for a cargo outfit, I'll have to ask him what his highest is.
102 Post contains images PGNCS : You're most welcome. I try to be as accurate and informative as possible in my posts and I am glad you found them useful!
103 Max Q : Very well said PG.
104 Viscount724 : The current FAA type certificate data sheet for all 747 models (last updated December 10, 2013) doesn't show any exceptions to the 42,100 for the -8F
105 Western727 : Thanks for the correction. Like to reiterate my earlier question: why the "ceiling penalty" for the -8F?
106 Post contains links Viscount724 : See Reply 7 in this 2011 thread. Why Different Max. FL For 747-8I And 747-8F? (by 747classic Dec 17 2011 in Tech Ops)
107 Western727 : Thank you again; for others who might be interested, RoseFlyer in the thread referenced by Viscount724 offers a well-written answer to why the 1,000'
108 Post contains links and images francoflier : No idea why. Maybe the operator I'm familiar with is cheating then... The spoiler software modification has now been retrofitted to the 748F. At leas
109 Post contains images CCA : Here are the facts. 744 max certified altitude is 45,100', if the aircraft is light enough you can end up towards there. This is me returning empty af
110 OceanATC : ^That should seal it for any doubters. I remember having a Cathay cargo 744F flying across between Auckland and Melbourne a few weeks ago and it was u
111 by738 : The speed seems quite slow in those cockpit images...id that because of the height ?
112 7BOEING7 : The indicated speed of 224 is a true airspeed of about 475 -- zero wind 475 ground speed.
113 Starlionblue : To expand on that, indicated airspeed is a measure of the dynamic pressure as measured by the pitot heat and static port. As altitude increases, air
114 rwessel : I assume that either the .829 or the .835 is the Mach number? And which is it? Or why are there two? And isn't that a bit slow for a cruising 747 (sh
115 Starlionblue : Assuming this works like on a 737, then the top number, in magenta, is the mach number commanded by the autoflight system. The bottom number, in whit
116 CCA : Also to be mentioned is that in ECON the A/C flies slower with a tailwind and faster with a headwind. You want to spend more time getting the benefit
117 BravoOne : Keep in mind that when in oceanic airspace most cruise speeds are mach controlled for spacing so the ECON goes out the door with this restriction appl
118 Max Q : Completely true and a very good point.
119 Pihero : Whgat's nice about EFIS is that you have all the information you need : On post # 108, You can read on the PFD : CAS 232 kt / Mach .852 /44900 ft ( t
120 seven47 : I agree...it's definitely rare to end up going very high in the 747 with any significant load, unless you're on a very long stage length. I've been f
121 Post contains images Starlionblue : Pffft. Who needs EFIS when you can use a CRP-5? On a side note, I had a crusty old ex-RAF ATPL instructor who would teach the CRP-5 methods for "!#¤
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