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Fuel Burn For Taxiing Aircraft  
User currently offlineRampoperator From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 9 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 21152 times:

Is there a list of fuel burn for taxiing aircraft (default engine).

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 21183 times:

Airlines tend to use what they call "Standard Figures" I think its about 1 Tonne of fuel at LHR for a B747-400. Two tons might be used at larger airports such as JFK. I will guess that the airlines will monitor the fuel usage during taxi and adjust the standard figure based on their findings


Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1572 posts, RR: 24
Reply 2, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 21153 times:

2 tons fuel for taxi !!? That must be one hell of a beast but I know nothing about the 747.

What I can comment about is for the planes that I used to fly and now I am flying.We used standart figures 130 kg for 737400, 150 kg for 737800, 280 kgs now for the A 320/321.



Widen your world
User currently offlineGrbld From Netherlands, joined Dec 2005, 353 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 21143 times:

It is a standard figure and also takes into account the fuel burn by the APU while in the turnaround and engine start. We use 200kg for the 737NG.

Grbld


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4014 posts, RR: 34
Reply 4, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 21099 times:

The flight planning system used by larger airlines adjusts the taxi fuel by airport and time of day. I see different figures all the time, but around 200kg for A320 and 400kg for B777, this with an average 10 min taxi.

User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 21091 times:

At SQ, on the 744 we use a standard of 1,000kgs. It's up to the Captain if he wants more for places such as LHR, ORD, JFK where there is a chance of a ground delay.

I'd say that 1000kgs is on the generous side.


User currently offlineOkie From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3061 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 21072 times:

Thanks for the answers

Using the 130kg figure using rough numbers that works out to about 40 US gallons.

Using the SWAG method (scientific wild a$$ guess) of 50% used by APU, gate time, temp, and apu load would obviously vary.

I would suspect a rough number of about 25% used by each turbine on a narrow isle twin or about 10 gallons saving for a single engine taxi.

@$2.00 per gallon about $20.00 per single engine taxi savings
@$2.50 per gallon about $25.00 per single engine taxi savings

So if you are talking a large fleet at 7 flights per day per aircraft using the $20 savings you are looking at $140 per day per aircraft. A large fleet would make a substantial savings.

Okie


User currently offlineJspitfire From Canada, joined Feb 2005, 308 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 21057 times:

For the Cessna 172 we estimate using 1.1 gallons for taxiing and the run-up. And for the Twin Comanche, which has virtually the same engines as the 172, we use 2.2 gallons.  Smile

Jason


User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 21001 times:

Well, its not uncommon at places such as JFK and LHR to have taxi times around the 40-50 minute mark.

Your APU will burn about 500 kgs per hour on a B747-400. Interestingly, on our aircraft, the engines are GE but the APU is PW  Wink.



Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
User currently offlineQANTAS747-438 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1966 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 20939 times:

500 lbs of gas for taxi-fuel for a 733, 735, 737NG for WN plus an additional 100lbs in engine one for startup fuel.


My posts/replies are strictly my opinion and not that of any company, organization, or Southwest Airlines.
User currently offlineCX flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6610 posts, RR: 55
Reply 10, posted (8 years 9 months 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 20925 times:

We allow for 500KGs on the 777. This accounts for about 30mins of APU (After fuel is on board) and for taxi fuel. We normally get away with using just less than this...but sometimes it can be more.

User currently offlineGoBoeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2700 posts, RR: 15
Reply 11, posted (8 years 9 months 23 hours ago) and read 20834 times:

A dispatch release from a B-747-200F flight I was on shows 3,000 pounds for taxi fuel and that was at JFK at 3:00AM.

Nick


User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4204 posts, RR: 37
Reply 12, posted (8 years 9 months 10 hours ago) and read 20734 times:

The CRJ-200/440 with GE CF34-3B1 engines will typically burn about 360-380 pounds per hour per engine. Taxi burn is planned between 200-800 pounds depending on the length of taxi and airport.

I utilize single engine anytime a long taxi is planned to double the amount of time I can taxi around before breaking into contingency fuel.



Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5003 posts, RR: 43
Reply 13, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 20672 times:

We use 200Kgs taxi fuel for the A319/320 and 300Kgs for the A321. For forecast long taxis or deicing, additives are applied.


Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 14, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 20666 times:

1500-2000lb for our MD-11

User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (8 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 20658 times:

DHC-8 uses about 260 lbs/hr per side for taxi. If you feather you can bring it down to 160 or so. We usualy taxi on 2 engines @ outstations where we have a short wait, but at the hubs we'll go out on 1.


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineWheeltug From Australia, joined Jan 2006, 11 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 20349 times:

An interesting discussion  Smile I run a company that is developing a ground propulsion system which uses electric motors placed inside the front wheels to drive around (backwards and forwards) on APU power alone. Anybody want to hazard any guesses as to what the fuel savings might be for particular aircraft. I for one, don't know, I just started the job  Smile I'm just trying to figure out which aircraft model would be the best target for our first product: Big, but few flights or small but lots of flights.

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 17, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 20345 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Welcome to the forum, Wheeltug! Keep us posted on the progress of your product.

By the way....is this it?






2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineRsbj From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 152 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (8 years 8 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 20253 times:

The CFM56-7b on our 700's burn about 650 Lb/hr per engine with no bleed, and 690 with engine bleeds on. I think if you divide the certified thrust by 40 to 50, you'll be real close to ground idle fuel burn per hour on just about any modern high bypass fan.


I fly really fast and take a lot of chances.
User currently offlineDispatchguy From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1249 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (8 years 8 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 20085 times:

For the CRJ700; I have programmed into our SABRE flight planning system 250 lbs for everywhere but ORD during the late afternoon; then I have 400 lbs programmed in.


But, if you have a good gate close to 32L-T10, you get right out...



Nobody screws you better than an airline job!
User currently offlineWheeltug From Australia, joined Jan 2006, 11 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (8 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 19817 times:

That is it, although just a demo model. As another poster in another thread pointed out, it wouldn't exactly retract nicely.

I've taken a long time to respond because I've been hard at work learning as much as I can learn and putting together a new web site. Being as I'm not an aerospace guy by birth (just a finance guy by training, actually) I'd love it if people wanted to take a look at the new website before it went public to correct my mistakes. It's at www.wheeltug.gi/beta.

Many many thanks!

Joseph


User currently offlineYOW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 12 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 19359 times:

Quoting LongHauler (Reply 13):
We use 200Kgs taxi fuel for the A319/320 and 300Kgs for the A321. For forecast long taxis or deicing, additives are applied.

LongHauler or anyone else on here, do you allocate 200 Kgs across the board for 319/320s or do you allocate more for large airports like YYZ & YVR (say 250 kgs) and less ground burn fuel at smaller airports like YOW & YHZ say (175 kgs)?

How does an A320 compare to a 73G or 733?


User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (7 years 12 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 19245 times:

It's a fantastic idea...electric motors are great for generating gobs of torque from a very small package, and that's all you really need for groud ops on an airplane. It's hard to think of a worse way to move an airplane on the ground than a jet engine, really. Maybe several million mice on a very large treadmill...  Wink


There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4014 posts, RR: 34
Reply 23, posted (7 years 12 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 19242 times:

Quoting YOW (Reply 21):
LongHauler or anyone else on here, do you allocate 200 Kgs across the board for 319/320s or do you allocate more for large airports like YYZ & YVR (say 250 kgs)

When we get the flight plan it has a suggested taxi fuel that varies from 140kg up to 250kg. The flight planning computor has averaged out the taxi times for different airports at different times of day and suggests a mean. The pilot can then adjust this to allow for local conditions. (A320).


User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (7 years 12 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 19239 times:

Quoting YOW (Reply 21):
do you allocate more for large airports

Absolutely. We see 400+ lbs for LGA and sometimes 100 or less @ outstations.



When in doubt, one B pump off
25 Post contains links Alessandro : Wheeltug, thanks for the link just remove the dot in the end, www.wheeltug.gi/beta
26 N231YE : For a Cessna 172, taxiing for about 10 minutes, and including the run-up, I typically factor in 1 gallon.
27 Post contains links Dl757md : Just curious, I've never worked on the 744. I'm not sure how accurate the info I have on them is but the ICAO says the 747 APU uses 11 lbs/min or 300
28 Starlionblue : Unfortunately you're assuming that taxi on one engine uses half the fuel of taxi on two. I would think the number is a bit higher than that, but stil
29 Uadc8contrail : iirc ua895 takes a 2600lb taxi at ord and thats usually c16 to 32L full length
30 JetMech : I fully agree with you there Lemurs, the propulsive efficiency of almost zero whilst a jetliner taxis on the ground in no way makes up for the fantas
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