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Duct Tape+Airplane=Good To Go  
User currently offlineNewark777 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 9348 posts, RR: 30
Posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 21423 times:

Could anyone explain what exactly is going on in this picture? Is this guy actually duct taping the covering of the engine pylon? Funny picture either way.


http://www.collegehumor.com/pictures/1623039/

Harry


Why grab a Heine when you can grab a Busch?
31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWingscrubber From UK - England, joined Sep 2001, 845 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 21444 times:

You mean you didn't know engines are held on with duct tape? Big grin
Um, I'm guessing it's 'special' duct tape?



Resident TechOps Troll
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 21467 times:

Its aluminized (aluminum) tape also known as speed tape or 600 mph tape. The sheet metal mans friend. Been used for years. This guy appears to be using it to seal up a pylon.

User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 21437 times:

its speed tape! alumium duct tape!  Wink

User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 21420 times:

grrrr u beat me! lol......should have radiused corners really shouldnt it?

User currently offlineA319XFW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 21435 times:

It's probably speed tape.
Great stuff and extremely sticky. I remember trying to pull it off a doubler on a flap but just couldn't!


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 21414 times:

I remember this stuff as far back as patching bulletholes in helicopter rotor blades. The trick there was you had to start at the trailing edge, wrap it around the leading edge and back to the trailing edge, covering both entry and exit holes. Then you had to put a piece of tape the same length - and therefore the same weight at the identical station on the opposite blade for balance purposes.

This was only a valid repair for honeycomb construction blades as they should lose no mass and weight when a bullet passes through them.

This is only partly tongue-in-cheek.

I've seen it on many a leading edge on wing or tail. If you wanted to search the photos here it probably shows up in a few wing or tail closeups.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 21381 times:

He's probably covering a very minor delamination. Either that or the aft engine cone bolt is missing  Smile

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 21341 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD DATABASE EDITOR




Found some examples in the DB:


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Photo © Spencer Wilmot
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Photo © Eduard Brantjes




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Photo © Mario Nonaka






2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 21334 times:

When I was working at Douglas there were a few incidents of underwing doors being lost, mostly because the latches were not adjusted properly. When the aircraft was in a high angle of attack with the slats deployed, the negative pressure was enough to suck the door open and rip it off.
After one incident of this type on a Delta MD11, a door was replaced but instead of adjusting it properly the engineer recommended the use of aluminum speed tape to "seal it up" so they could go on another test flight.

Sure enough it sucked that door off as well. What happened the the engineer? Probably got a promotion and a bonus.


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 21307 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 8):
Found some examples in the DB:

In the first picture.. The panel he is protecting has an eroded edge and the tape will protect it from continuing to peel up and also protect it from moisture.. which for composites is a very-very bad thing

On the Airbus A340 it's covering some test wiring. VERY common on flight test aircraft.

On the USAirways 767 my guess would be covering edge composite damage to prevent moisture ingress, a very bad thing...and the tape, a VERY common short term fix.

On the Embraer 170.... Hump Seal Repair..!! The sealant used is dry to the touch, but must be protected to fly. I think the AMM allows 3 or 4 days like that until the tape must be removed.

In my 10 years I've fixed dozens and dozens of aircraft this way... fully legal and right in the FAA approved manuals..!!



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineNewark777 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 9348 posts, RR: 30
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 21271 times:

Thanks for all the info, learn something new every day!  Smile

Harry



Why grab a Heine when you can grab a Busch?
User currently offlineDColeMAN From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 274 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 21233 times:

Looks abit worrying, but if the FAA approve it then it can't be that bad...



 scratchchin 

Dale



Topless Women Drink 4 Free
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 21203 times:

Quoting DColeMAN (Reply 12):
Looks abit worrying, but if the FAA approve it then it can't be that bad...

Window Fay Seal repair... with a few flight under it. No worries.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineSfomb67 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 417 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 21050 times:

Although the tape in this pix is 600 MPH foil tape. Gray tape known as "duct" tape is "pit" tape when you enter aviation. I still call it pit tape at home, and everyone says "What?"


Not as easy as originally perceived
User currently offline777 From Italy, joined Sep 2005, 514 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 21009 times:

Quoting DColeMAN (Reply 12):
Looks abit worrying, but if the FAA approve it then it can't be that bad...

Exactly! As far as I know it has been used since 30+ years to do quick repairs waiting for the standard ones...

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 6):
I remember this stuff as far back as patching bulletholes in helicopter rotor blades. The trick there was you had to start at the trailing edge, wrap it around the leading edge and back to the trailing edge, covering both entry and exit holes. Then you had to put a piece of tape the same length - and therefore the same weight at the identical station on the opposite blade for balance purposes.

This was only a valid repair for honeycomb construction blades as they should lose no mass and weight when a bullet passes through them.

Hi SlamClick,
I found your contribution quite impressive, but I have a question for you:
since my father has been a Sea King copter pilot for decades, sometime I was used to go with him while he was performing the pre-flight check on the copter.
Each time I was so excited… the best part was when my father asked me to climb whit him to the inspection footboard near the main rotor…
During one of those pre-check I remember that, looking at the join between the main rotor and each blade there was a sort of “pressure indicator” subject to accurate check by the pilot before each flight.
If I remember well (at that time I was only 10-12 years old), he told me that this indicator it’s so important to be checked because, in case of loss of internal pressure due to an hole (for instance), your blade will stall and you will crash… Now I’m quite sure that the blades of the Sea King are made with honeycomb construction, so I’m a bit confused…
Maybe the Sea King has a different system or maybe my memory it’s wrong… what’s your opinion?

Cheers!


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31573 posts, RR: 57
Reply 16, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 20873 times:

Quoting DColeMAN (Reply 12):

Wont last long.Needs to be reapplied soon.
Very good to cover Fraying edges of panels.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineVzlet From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 829 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 20809 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 2):
speed tape or 600 mph tape



Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 3):
its speed tape! alumium duct tape!

These guys can probably get by with the 100mph variety:

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Photo © Mark Carlisle




"That's so stupid! If they're so secret, why are they out where everyone can see them?" - my kid
User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 18, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 20773 times:

Hi 777, Buzz here. Funny, i was a about 10 or 12 when my Dad was flying SH-3A's ... those Sea King helos. I used to read the NATOPS manuals for fun (Maybe that's how i became plane-crazy?)
I recall that was called the "BIM Blade Indicator", it had black and white stripes if the pressure in the blade was good, all white if it had leaked. So if there was a crack in the blade, the pressure would leak down and somebody would notice before the blade came apart.

Speed Tape... 600 mph tape.... vibration dampening tape: it's useful stuff for covering joints where you've sealed a panel on a cool night - the sealant won't set up when it's less than 50 degrees.
We also have Cargo Pit Tape, which is a heavy duty, flame resistant form of duct tape. You can't tear it with your fingers, have to use a knife. It's not aluminum like Speed tape.
g'day


User currently offline777 From Italy, joined Sep 2005, 514 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 20673 times:

Quoting Buzz (Reply 18):
Hi 777, Buzz here. Funny, i was a about 10 or 12 when my Dad was flying SH-3A's

... wow, what a coincidence! My father was flying the SH-3D/H version from 1973 to 1993... probably the most reliable copter in the world!!!


View Large View Medium
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Photo © Andrea Buzzacchi



before that date he was flying SH-34 and AB-204...

Quoting Buzz (Reply 18):
I recall that was called the "BIM Blade Indicator", it had black and white stripes if the pressure in the blade was good, all white if it had leaked. So if there was a crack in the blade, the pressure would leak down and somebody would notice before the blade came apart.

Yes, you should press a botton and wait the appearance of the black stripes!

Nice to have met you here Buzz!

Cheers  wave 


User currently offlineSinlock From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 1597 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 20635 times:

Just to pop in one more fact that hasn't been mentioned yet.....

Depending on the brand and the length/with of the roll, but the average roll costs around $70.00



My Country can beat up your Country....
User currently offlineYYZYYT From Canada, joined Apr 2005, 924 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 20569 times:

Quoting Newark777 (Thread starter):
Could anyone explain what exactly is going on in this picture? Is this guy actually duct taping the covering of the engine pylon? Funny picture either way.

NO!
It's a Gremlin... and look, he's tearing the engine duct tape apart!

YYZYYT

PS What do you mean you can't see him? He's right there!


User currently offlineErj-145mech From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 306 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (8 years 3 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 19712 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 10):
On the Embraer 170.... Hump Seal Repair..!! The sealant used is dry to the touch, but must be protected to fly. I think the AMM allows 3 or 4 days like that until the tape must be removed.

One hundred and fifty calendar hours on the DMI for hump sealant cure time.


User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3381 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (8 years 3 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 19617 times:

what in the sam hill is a calender hour?


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineReidYYZ From Kyrgyzstan, joined Sep 2005, 536 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (8 years 3 months 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 19590 times:

Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 23):
calender hour?

Time on the clock as opposed to flight hours.


25 L-188 : There have been more then one light plane in Alaska brought out of the bush, with more duct tape then fabric because a Moose, Bear, or brush took a li
26 Post contains images HAWK21M : Normal time by the watch. BTW why the term Sam Hill. regds MEL
27 JarheadK5 : I've heard duct tape (the regular, cloth, hardware-store variety) called a lot of things over the years... but never "pit tape". Interesting... That
28 Amtrosie : Actually there is more involved. As has been pointed out "speed tape" is an aluminum foil tape that is very strong, and will slice your finger to the
29 Sfomb67 : "Pit tape" is used to tape the seams of the Fiberglas panels used to line the walls and ceiling of the cargo pits. Also used to repair small tears in
30 MD-90 : Legend in Alabama has it that it's a location in hell. Also, our bandroom at my high school was located on Sam hill. Our director even had a custom S
31 Post contains images HAWK21M : Out here the terms used are very Different.Thanks regds MEL
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