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Are Trijets Easier To Fly In Engine Failure  
User currently offlineNewagebird From Australia, joined Sep 2005, 64 posts, RR: 2
Posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4312 times:

Hey everybody,
I havent completed a twin engine endorsement therefore i have little understanding of the topic. I hear that in a twin engine, if u had an engine failure u had to apply full opposite rudder and then trim the aircraft to compensate for assymetric thrust.
With a tri-jet such as the MD-11 or L-1011, is it a lot more easier to fly if the port engine (for example) fails?
Also is it possible to fly with only one engine functioning in a tri-jet.
Thanks
rgds newagebird

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4312 times:
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Quoting Newagebird (Thread starter):
With a tri-jet such as the MD-11 or L-1011, is it a lot more easier to fly if the port engine (for example) fails?

Failure of a wing-mounted engine is going to result in asymetric thrust and drag regardless of the number of engines.

Failure of a tail-mounted engine on a tri-jet, however, will not affect the directional stability or control, because that engine is perfectly centered along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft.




Quoting Newagebird (Thread starter):
Also is it possible to fly with only one engine functioning in a tri-jet.

It would depend on a number of things. Particularly, aircraft weight.

By the way...welcome to A.net!




2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2543 posts, RR: 24
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4306 times:

Not really any different, since the centre engine does not affect the asymmetric yawing moment of the good wing mounted engine. Unless of course it is the centre engine which fails  Smile

On the basis that the L-1011, DC-10 and MD11 are really over-powered twins, you should be able to maintain height on one engine, though not full cruising altitude. Performance would depend on aircraft weight and ambient conditions. Obviously climbing, let alone takeoff, would be out of the question, however one engine on a trijet should get you safely to a nearby alternate.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4293 times:

Look at the wing engines on the DC-10 and MD-11, you will see that they are in close to the fuselage. This is to compensate for a wing engine failure. They are trying to keep the thrust as close to the center line as possible. The wing engines on the L-1011 are out further away from the fuselage. The reason the L-1011 can have its engines further away from the fuselage than the DC-10 and MD-11 is that the placement of the L-1011's center engine provides better center line thrust and the L-1011 has a much greater vertical stabilizer surface area then the DC-10 or MD-11. Failure of the center engine on any of the tri-jets does not produce asymmetrical thrust. Flying on two engines it is possible to maintain altitude (depending on weight and altitude) but with just one engine operative, you should be looking for a place to put it down fairly quick.

User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4238 times:

Examples,
L1011-100, RB.211-22B engines, AUW 200,000kg, ISA+10
Max altitude all engines operating, FL330
2 engines operating, FL190
1 engine operating, 6,000 feet

L1011-250, RB.211-524B402 engines, AUW 200,000kg, ISA+10
Max altitude, all engines operating, FL350
2 engines operating, FL260
1 engine operating, 12,000 feet

With both aircraft, with one engine inoperative, fuel burn increases 500kg/hour, approximately, with the 2 engine cruise speed of 440 KTAS


User currently offlineKevinl1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4214 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 3):
The reason the L-1011 can have its engines further away from the fuselage than the DC-10 and MD-11 is that the placement of the L-1011's center engine provides better center line thrust

And, should one fall off.... or grenade...the ship is still flyable!  Wink

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):
Failure of a tail-mounted engine on a tri-jet, however, will not affect the directional stability or control

I know of a UAL crew who had a hard landing in Iowa that might dispute this. razz 

Please, do not think I am bashing the DC-10. The 10 is a superb freighter and tanker. Just don't transport any PAX in one.  biggrin 

Pls. give me a minute to find my nomex underwear.  flamed 



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
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