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Take Off Roll Call Outs  
User currently offlineCruzinAltitude From United States of America, joined May 2004, 415 posts, RR: 1
Posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6689 times:

I have a quick question for any Pilots (or people who know way to much about aviation to not be a pilot). . .

As the flight crew advances an airliner down the runway, what is called out just before "V1 Rotate" and what is called out just after "V1 Rotate?"

Thanks in advance for your responses.

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSeanp11 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 290 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6690 times:

"V1" and "Rotate" technically are seperate callouts. :p


Perhaps the callout you are talking about is the one for 80 kts. That is when the rudder becomes active.


User currently offlineCruzinAltitude From United States of America, joined May 2004, 415 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6687 times:

Thats true, they are seperate call outs. Im just wondering what is the call out right before, and right after.

User currently offlineCruzinAltitude From United States of America, joined May 2004, 415 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6681 times:

Is it "V1" "Rotate" "V2"?

and if so, what does V2 mean?


User currently offlineOnetogo From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 314 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6662 times:

Callouts of "airspeed alive" followed by "80 knots ... V1 ... Rotate (some say 'vee are') ... V2" are pretty much standard on all flight decks from what I've seen.

User currently offlineCruzinAltitude From United States of America, joined May 2004, 415 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6646 times:

Great, thanks for the info.

User currently offlineSeanp11 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 290 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6637 times:

V2 is the minium safe climbout speed. The aircraft can fly after this speed.

User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6003 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6632 times:

V1 = maximum speed that a takeoff may be aborted if an engine is lost.
Vr = speed at which rotation should occur
V2 = minimum flight safety speed. This is the minimum speed that will allow the aircraft to climb out on one engine.

There are many, many other V speeds as well, but that's not the scope of this thread.

[Edited 2006-03-03 03:50:23]


Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6589 times:

The call outs also vary greatly from company to company.

On the 727 and ERJ for ex, V1/Vr were/are typically the same number - unless a V1 reduction is made. This would be due to a contaminated runway, for example, in which an earlier decision speed helps mitigate the probability of executing a rejected take off.

cheers-


User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6573 times:

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 8):
The call outs also vary greatly from company to company.

That's true, we just make the 80kt call, V1 and rotate, no V2 call in the MD-11.


User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6003 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6559 times:

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 8):
The call outs also vary greatly from company to company.

V speeds are figured from performance tables set by the manufacturer. I've never heard of 'airline specific' speeds.



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6528 times:

Goldenshield, here are 2 examples...

Embraer certifies and flys the ERJ in the landing config at the top of the white arc for an approach speed. Most ERJ operators in the US add 5-10 kts to this value for their ref and target speeds. This varies from airline to airline. Cont EXpress, before the XJT days, was white arc plus 10 for both values (which were separated by 5 kts). About 3 years ago, they went to "white arc" plus 5 kts due to the fact that 5 kts makes a big diff for a transport category a/c in terms of landing distance, which corresponds to revenue. Because these values were published in FAA approved manuals, the new values had to reapproved by the FAA, but are certainly airline specific.


User currently offlineGoBoeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2693 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6528 times:

Northwest uses:

80 knots
checks

100

120 (if needed)

140 (if needed)

Vee one

Rotate, ## degrees

Positive rate
gear up


User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6003 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6522 times:

Most airlines use Aerodata now anyhow, and since they are FAA approved, it's pretty much irrelevant anymore. :P

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 11):
5 kts makes a big diff for a transport category a/c in terms of landing distance, which corresponds to revenue.

5 knots makes a big difference in terms terms of landing distance, which corresponds to SAFETY.



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6516 times:

The 2nd example is takeoff performance...Boeing never published a comprehensive, reduced thrust takeoff profile for the 727. Why? Because it was fleet specific. NWA had a fleet that consisted of a/c from several manufacturers (Hughes Airwest, Republic, Eastern, etc) with thrust combinations that were too expansive for Boeing to consider. NWA used JT8D-9s, -15s, -17s, and 17 Aprs... and was approved for an Intermix for those engines, meaning an a/c could have 3 different dash types on the same a/c.

If you've followed this so far, then you'll follow the rest. That variation was airline specific, therefore the V speeds were as well. Not a huge difference, but a significant difference...


User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6508 times:

Goldenshield,

So now maybe you agree w/ me? What's the biggest gag in the crewroom when the weather's bad?

"How's the weather at XYZ? Doesn't matter...we GOIN' anyhow!!!"

The airline business is based on $$$....the safety part comes from crews, maintenance, dispatch and ATC, among others...


cheers-


User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6003 posts, RR: 14
Reply 16, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 6424 times:

Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 15):
"How's the weather at XYZ? Doesn't matter...we GOIN' anyhow!!!"

That's a new one on me. Usually, it's "What can we break to get out of this trip?"



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 17, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6369 times:

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 10):
V speeds are figured from performance tables set by the manufacturer. I've never heard of 'airline specific' speeds.

I THINK what the post is referring to is what CALLOUTS do airlines use. This would/ could be airline specific. I can say that here we used to call 80, V1, rotate,positive rate AND V2 in the 727; in the MD-11 we don't call V2 because the FMS is going to guide you to V2+10 with all eng and V2 with an eng. out so it's a superfluous call. For app/ldg there are no airspeed calls(for us) except "Betty's" calls at 500', 50, 40, 30, ..etc.


User currently offline757dc10fltmech From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 47 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 6350 times:

Some callouts I have seen while riding as an observer on the DC10-30:

PIC: "Auto throttles on set take-off thrust."

The FE will then watch the throttles and engines to make sure they are at the proper TO thrust setting per the TRC when it is verified the FE calls out: "thrust set"



CAN DO!
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6003 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 6338 times:

Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 17):
I THINK what the post is referring to is what CALLOUTS do airlines use.

I think you may be right. It's all a matter of interpretation to what was said.



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineEssentialPowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 6317 times:

"The call outs also vary greatly from company to company." That was exactly the point I was making from the beginning.


Cheers-


User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6261 times:

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 16):
Quoting EssentialPowr (Reply 15):
"How's the weather at XYZ? Doesn't matter...we GOIN' anyhow!!!"

That's a new one on me. Usually, it's "What can we break to get out of this trip?"

Golden's right. It's all about getting out of the trip. Unless it's the last day, then it's all about finishing early.



09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4194 posts, RR: 37
Reply 22, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6245 times:

We have:

set thrust.... thrust set
80 knots... check
V1
rotate
V2
Positive rate.... gear up

The rest are Flight guidance callouts. Speed mode at V2+10-15, Heading or Nav mode at 400 feet, and the autopilot becomes and option at 600 feet.



Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 23, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 6236 times:

Quoting XFSUgimpLB41X (Reply 22):
Speed mode at V2+10-15

I presume (with a name like mine I can presume) that's Speed Mode between V2+10 and V2+15, rather than V2-5? (Pardon the ignorance!)


User currently offlinePihero From France, joined Jan 2005, 4402 posts, RR: 76
Reply 24, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6185 times:

During the takeoff roll it is better to have a quiet cockpit apart from the very important call outs :
Ready to go, the captain announces "Takeoff, V1 is xxx kts"
Once the thrust is set PNF announces "parameters stable"
PF calls out the FMA "Man Flex XX° SRS RWY NAV and A/THR armed "
PNF :
-100Kts (for ASIs xcheck and the signal that from now on we'll only reject for an engine failure or a severe structural damage)
-V1
-Rotate



Contrail designer
25 EssentialPowr : In the US it's typically called a "sterile cockpit." Some airlines use "parameters stable" others use "thrust set, xx.x%N1". The takeoff profile callo
26 PhilSquares : The takeoff callouts are really airline specific. For example, on the 744, the calls vary from a few airlines I've been involved with. For instance, s
27 EssentialPowr : "The takeoff callouts are really airline specific" ...I think we've made that point!
28 Post contains images PhilSquares : And your point is? Judging by the responses, that point, while written, hasn't been made.
29 EssentialPowr : I respectfully disagree. Did you take the time to read the entire thread? I think it's been rather well made, with examples, and in fact you restated
30 Post contains images PhilSquares : Like I said, judging by the comments, people either didn't read that or just didn't care. I didn't know this forum was restricted to one correct resp
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