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MD 82 Wing Placement  
User currently offlineRodge From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 189 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2968 times:

Hi all,

Is there a tecnical reason why the sings on the MD 82 are so far back:

Eg:


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To me, they seem too far back.

Why?


Smile
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDH106 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 626 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2962 times:

Simple center of gravity reasons - heavy engines at the back.


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User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17068 posts, RR: 66
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2954 times:

If you look at the MD-90 you will see that the entire stretch from the MD-81/82/83/88 is forward of the wing, making this effect even more pronounced. This is to compensate for the added weight of the engines.


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User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2926 times:

Quoting DH106 (Reply 1):
heavy engines at the back.

Correct.

Also the T-tail is heavier than a conventional tail because the vertical fin must support the weight and dynamic loads of the horizontal stab. Also the APU and the packs are located back in the tailcone. There is an aft airstair and door in the pressure bulkhead all of which add weight back there.

If you could have an MD-80 fuselage, without the wings, the balance point would be very far back along the tube. In fact, the station where the wings are mounted reflects this.



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User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17068 posts, RR: 66
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2909 times:

The same design decisions are reflected in the placement of the 727 wing:

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As SlamClick says, lots of weight back there:

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[Edited 2006-04-24 17:48:03]


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineN685FE From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 451 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2772 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 4):
The same design decisions are reflected in the placement of the 727 wing:

Incorrect. The 727-200 fuselage plugs were added to body station lines 720 and 950, repeated six times and identified by the letter A through F. Each cover a distance of ten feet. Station 950 begins just aft of the main wheel well area.



psp. lead by example
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17068 posts, RR: 66
Reply 6, posted (8 years 6 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2724 times:

Quoting N685FE (Reply 5):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 4):
The same design decisions are reflected in the placement of the 727 wing:

Incorrect. The 727-200 fuselage plugs were added to body station lines 720 and 950, repeated six times and identified by the letter A through F. Each cover a distance of ten feet. Station 950 begins just aft of the main wheel well area.

I meant that compared with, say, a 737, the wing is further back.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21681 posts, RR: 55
Reply 7, posted (8 years 6 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2663 times:

The MD-11 (and DC-10) wing is pretty far back too. Again, heavy engine at the back that affects the center of gravity.

-Mir



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User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8309 posts, RR: 23
Reply 8, posted (8 years 6 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2607 times:

CRJ-900 is the same deal. As is the -700 for that matter.


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User currently offlineN685FE From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 451 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (8 years 6 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2522 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 2):
If you look at the MD-90 you will see that the entire stretch from the MD-81/82/83/88 is forward of the wing, making this effect even more pronounced. This is to compensate for the added weight of the engines.



Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 4):
The same design decisions are reflected in the placement of the 727 wing:

Since you only showed -200 in the pics you chose, I thought you suggested that the entire stretch was forward of the wing like you mentioned above.



psp. lead by example
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17068 posts, RR: 66
Reply 10, posted (8 years 6 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2498 times:

Quoting N685FE (Reply 9):
Since you only showed -200 in the pics you chose, I thought you suggested that the entire stretch was forward of the wing like you mentioned above.

Nah, I just think the -200 looks better  Wink



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineJeb94 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 604 posts, RR: 5
Reply 11, posted (8 years 5 months 3 weeks ago) and read 2351 times:

The 717 is a DC9-30 fuselage with a 5 foot plug added forward of the wing to compensate for the engines. The equipment in the tail compartment are smaller and lighter and in production versions the ventral stairs were eliminated. The prototype originally did have ventral stairs but they proved to be too heavy.

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