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Engine Failure Checklist 737 Series Question  
User currently offlineJulianUK From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2006, 105 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 5 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 9598 times:

Can anyone give me an idea of the checklist for a single engine failure for a 737/757 aircraft? Who would do what first and if it was not a fire but could not be restarted who is doing what at what stage? I am interested in whether you have to start trimming the aircraft straight away, or taking the autopilot/autothrottles off and flying manually?

And worse of all if this failure occurs either on approach or rotation where does the check list fit in while doing all the rest of things that happen with approach/rotation - would you be calling V2 etc or go straight to check list for engine failure?

J

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineClumsy From Turkey, joined Dec 2005, 3 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 5 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 9531 times:

Let' s be superficial...
(for 737)
During take off after you pass minimum flap retraction altitude you speed up your airplane, put your plane in clean configuration, adjust thrust and proceed with normal SID or Engine out SID while doing Engine Failure and Shutdown checklist. If conditions permit you may request Engine In-flight checklist.
During cruise just disconnect A/P and A/T, adjust your thrust and rudder trim, call for descent altitude and speed, turn out off the airway, call for Engine Failure and Shutdown checklist, if conditions permit you may request Engine In-flight checklist and eventhough you re-start the engine land as soon as possible to the nearest suitable airport.
While landing if you decide to land put flaps back into 15 degrees, increase speed 20 kts and land; or execute a go- around with flaps 15 ...
Every company has its own procedures based on Boeing one' s.
HTH
With my best regards,


User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (8 years 5 months 21 hours ago) and read 9491 times:

Boeing recommends that you do not procede with any NNC (non normal checklist) if you are in the departure/arrival phase of flight, or if it jeaporsizes air safety..

in the case of an engine failure during takeoff, we don't do anything that much differnt, fly the plane, speed it up, clean it up and then procede with an engine fail shutdown checklist...which is very basic...it tells you to close the throttle, cutoff the fuel, switch off the a/c pack for the failed side, start the APU and replace the failed BUS with it and finally balance ur fuel.....

that takes about 30 seconds to do all that



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (8 years 5 months 20 hours ago) and read 9483 times:

Aydin, do you shut down the APU as soon as the generators are online or do you leave it running longer?

Since it takes a long time to get it online I'd thought that you leave it running for safety reasons in bad weather climbs or descents.



The conveyor belt plane will fly
User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (8 years 5 months 15 hours ago) and read 9452 times:

hey there, good question. If we have dispatched with 2 normally working CSDs and the engine comes back online, it is normal practice, at least from what i've seen, to leave the APU on for a little while, just incase the engine craps out again. All that will depend on the conditions for failure...if it was a harmless flameout i,e a situation that permits a restart, then the APU can be switched off fairly soon. Depending on the a/c the APU can come online in a range from 30 seconds, and sometimes it takes up to 1.5 minutes! just depends on how she feels LOL.

At night it is common practice at our airline to switch the APU on, during final approach, in case we go around and have an engine failure, we have a crucial element...electricity! Even in the sim it's nerve wrecking when electrical faults start coming at you, eventually causing u to fly on DC stanby power with only a handful of instruments working....

nothing is a gurantee in this world....you can lose one engine, thus losing the generator, then you can lose the generator in the other engine.... anything can happen, so the APU consumes little fulel at altitude, about 17kg/hour and on the ground somewhere around 150 kg/hour...basically nothing much

please send any other questions i can be of assistance with



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (8 years 5 months 14 hours ago) and read 9445 times:

Thanks! In the flightsim (xplane) the 737NG APU start is 81 seconds (can't be variable unfortunately) so I leave it on from pushback until FL180.

I'll start it during final too.

We (I cooperated on it) based much of our info on the "737NG Cockpit Companion" by Bill Bulfer http://www.fmcguide.com/catalog/

Official Boeing documentation was used for performance matching.

I love the 737  Smile



The conveyor belt plane will fly
User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (8 years 5 months 12 hours ago) and read 9428 times:

the 737 is the backbone of commercial aviation....im really glad that i fly the -400 series and still have a chance to see some round dials and conventional instruments  Smile

you can use the feelthere wilco -3/4/500 series too, it's a good way to fly on fs9



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (8 years 5 months 11 hours ago) and read 9421 times:

Thanks  Smile
Since I have a macintosh, MSFS is no option. But I'm very happy with Xplane and the way aircraft are moddable and can be built from scratch.

Have you tried it?

I'm desperately fishing for real 737 pilot's input on the simulated version... :p



The conveyor belt plane will fly
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