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Ever Notice That Some Planes Seem To Fly Smoother  
User currently offlineBucks918 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 69 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 3570 times:

Is it me, or do some planes just fly smoother than others? I flew on a 767 the other day and we were jerking all over the place, and this happens a lot with me and Boeings...yet when I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother, except for something I like to call the drop and drive on the Airbus. Did you ever notice that when it comes time to decent on an A320, the power seems to cut out all the way, and you start a steep decent? What is that??

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineOutlier From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3517 times:

Quoting Bucks918 (Thread starter):
Is it me, or do some planes just fly smoother than others? I flew on a 767 the other day and we were jerking all over the place, and this happens a lot with me and Boeings...yet when I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother,

Well Bucks918, its likely that what you were experiencing is an atmospheric phenomenon many aviators call "shakey shakey."

Visit your local Be A Pilot center and they'll explain it to you.
http://www.beapilot.com/indexfl.html


User currently offlineAvi8tir From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 410 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3510 times:
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Quoting Outlier (Reply 1):
Visit your local Be A Pilot center and they'll explain it to you.

hahaha. ya, that should do it!



*Long live the Widget*
User currently offlineFlyDreamliner From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2759 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3484 times:

Quoting Bucks918 (Thread starter):
I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother,

Yep, it must be those european designed suspensions.



"Let the world change you, and you can change the world"
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2148 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3452 times:

I think the B737-800 is a very smooth plane. I fly it a lot over the northern Atlantic, the Pyrreneas and the Alps. The MD80s are also very smooth. The B757-200 feels more rough while the B747-100 and B747-200 are both very smooth.

Good planes all of them, though the B757-200 is my favorite of the above.  Smile

cheers

Asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17017 posts, RR: 67
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3415 times:

Obviously a heavier aircraft will tend to be smoother because of Newton's second law of motion. Inertia makes it harder to move the plane.

As for differences between a 320 and a 737, you will probably find greater differences within the same aircraft depending on where you are sitting. For example, I refer to the back end of long aircraft as the whiplash zone because the fuse flexes more there.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3391 times:

Quoting Bucks918 (Thread starter):
this happens a lot with me and Boeings...yet when I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother

Maybe the European airplane is designed for those quaint cobblestone airways?



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineNonfirm From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 434 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3378 times:

I have been in bad weather on the 737 and the MD-80 and the MD-80 is far more stable than the 737 in bad weather. airplane 

User currently onlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17017 posts, RR: 67
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3375 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 6):

Maybe the European airplane is designed for those quaint cobblestone airways?

Yeah. But in the Middle Ages when they built them traffic was much less than nowadays.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3374 times:

Quoting Bucks918 (Thread starter):
Is it me, or do some planes just fly smoother than others? I flew on a 767 the other day and we were jerking all over the place, and this happens a lot with me and Boeings...yet when I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother, except for something I like to call the drop and drive on the Airbus. Did you ever notice that when it comes time to decent on an A320, the power seems to cut out all the way, and you start a steep decent? What is that??

How often do you fly?


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 3354 times:

Well I've flown a few different types of aircraft and with two exceptions I never flew one that I thought behaved in any unexpected or surprising way in turbulence.

The two exceptions were the Huey with its 48-foot rotor disk, with a light load, and I no longer even remember what it was about it that was noteworthy, and the DC-3 with its 95 foot wingspan and weight in the high teens or low twenties. It seemed to me (very subjective) to get 'pushed around' by turbulence. It rode it okay but the movements seemed large.

Problem is to compare them you'd have to fly them through IDENTICAL turbulence. Now turbulence is, by definition, turbulent. That means it is unpredictable, changes from minute to minute, and so on. I've had some of the smoothest rides of my life in standing lenticulars - in defiance of conventional wisdom about them.

Beyond a few constants like wing loading and stiffness (Electra comes to mind) there really isn't much you can generalize about.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9001 posts, RR: 75
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3345 times:

Quoting Nonfirm (Reply 7):
I have been in bad weather on the 737 and the MD-80 and the MD-80 is far more stable than the 737 in bad weather.

MD80 has a higher wing loading.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3214 times:

Quoting Bucks918 (Thread starter):
I flew on a 767 the other day and we were jerking all over the place, and this happens a lot with me and Boeings...yet when I fly A320's or A319's they seem much smoother, except for something I like to call the drop and drive on the Airbus

Main Entry: tur·bu·lence
Pronunciation: 't&r-by&-l&n(t)s
Function: noun
: the quality or state of being turbulent : as a : great commotion or agitation b : irregular atmospheric motion especially when characterized by up-and-down currents c : departure in a fluid from a smooth flow

All in jest, of course. Like aforementioned, some airplanes might be more stable in turbulence from the passengers' perspective. But really, the "drop and dive" and 767's being bouncy...that's just turbulence and you'd feel it on any other airplane.

[Edited 2006-07-29 17:33:10]

User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1645 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3107 times:

I think that you are very correct in saying that the "ride" in turbulence differs among passenger aircraft.

Wing loading and wing flex have a lot to do with what you feel in the passenger cabin. For my money, the B707 was a champion in this respect; you'd see the wingtips flexing and the engines nodding in the chop without a single bump reaching the cabin. There was almost the same shock absorber action going on with the B727.

My first flight in a B737, back in the early 1970s, felt more like a Model-T on a dirt road, in comparison.

The all-time stiff-winged bone-rattler had to be the Lockheed Electra; seemingly high wing loading but zip wing flex and shock transmission like hitting a steel girder with a baseball bat.


User currently offlineAC320tech From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 197 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3012 times:

It really all depends on turbulence.

All Airbus aircraft (exception to A300 and A310) have a turbulence dampening system that engages when the aircraft is clean (no flaps, slats, or gear) and over 200kts. Turbulence only is felt for a few seconds.


User currently offlineMikkel777 From Norway, joined Oct 2002, 370 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3001 times:

Quoting Zeke (Reply 11):
Quoting Nonfirm (Reply 7):
I have been in bad weather on the 737 and the MD-80 and the MD-80 is far more stable than the 737 in bad weather.

MD80 has a higher wing loading.

The 737, especially the 736, has a too weak yawdamper for it short lenght, and tends to fly sideways in turbulence. Large wing and short airplane is a bad combination.
Anyway, MD80/90 and 753 are probably my favorites in rough weather.


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2886 times:

Its almost entirely based on the airplane's wing loading... with runners up being the airplane's built in stability and the effectiveness of its systems (autopilot, yaw damper, ..)

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