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Aircraft Toilets  
User currently offlineAislepathLight From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 562 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 17105 times:

I have many a times standing in the lavs, wondering how airplane toilets work. Recently I have noticed that you have air coming in through the vents in the door, meaning to me, that there is some vacuum or low pressure part, but don't fully understand. I have decided to turn to you, a.netters, and need your help on understanding aircraft lavs.

So how do they work?


"We have slain a large dragon, but we now live in a jungle filled with a bewildering variety of poisonous snakes."
82 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1480 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 17095 times:

It was explained to me that the modern airliner toilets flush by opening a valve to the outside which allows the pressure from inside the cabin to force the waste down into a holding tank. SO, really it's just by utilizing the already present positive cabin pressure.


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17055 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



I had a WN maintenance guy explain how the system works, but I don't remember the details. I do, however, remember him describing how some engineers at Boeing flushed an object of some kind in the forward lav, and clocked the time it took for it to reach the aft holding tank.

They then converted the time and distance into miles per hour, and although I forget the figure, I remember the maintenance tech wrapping the presentation up by professing "That's one fast turd".




Quoting AirWillie6475 (Reply 4):
The guy above has some serious errors.

Relax. It's not your duty to call attention to them, or call him out on them. Just ignore it and get on with life.  Smile




2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17032 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 6):
It's not your duty to call attention to them, or call him out on them. Just ignore it and get on with life

I'm doing him a favor, if he wrote like that on something serious like a resume the employer will just pass right to the next person.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31692 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 16998 times:

Waste of Thread space on Teaching English....Folks......Lets concentrate on the Topic.



Normally there are Two Types.The Recycling type & the Vaccum type.

The Former has the Water treated with DDD [Dye,DisInfectant,Deodrant] in a Tank below the Commode.A reversible motor is used to port the Water around the commode when the Flush is operated.The Waste & water drains back in the Tank.

The Vaccum type uses Vaccumm compressor or Ambient air depending on the Altitude to create a low pressure after a bit of Water is sprinkled on the commode.The waste is collected in a Tank [On B737 located in the Aft Cargo Compt].

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4036 posts, RR: 33
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 17002 times:

I have met three types of aircraft toilets.
Type 1.
B737-2/3/4/5, DC9 B757 type where you sit on a tank of fluid. When you operate the flush this liquid which usually starts out blue but turns brown after a while! is circulated by a pump. The whole unit is self contained and drained via an external connection, one at a time.
Type 2
Tristar type which has a tank at the front, and another at the rear. Each tank serves up to five toilets but otherwise works the same as type 1.
Some tristars have type 1 toilets as well at L2 R2 doors.
Type 3.
Vacuum toilets. The tank is at the back of the aft freight. It is kept at a pressure below the cabin in flight by being open to the outside. When you operate the flush a tiny amount of fresh water is squirted intio the bowl and then the whole lot is sucked back into the tank. Below 10000ft their is a pair of vacuum pumps which run when you operate the flush lever to suck the fluids aft.
Ventilation.
the air you hear going past the door is ventilation. All toilets have a vent fan which sucks air out of the toilet and sends it overboard. There is typically a pair of vent fans at the back near the outflow valve. On our B757 the intake to these fans is down in the bowl so you sometimes hear the little flaps banging away when their springs are getting old.


User currently offline2enginesonly From Netherlands, joined Jun 2005, 91 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 16970 times:

There's another one Steve.
The old funnel and hose as used in our Coastguard Cessna 404......aim, shoot and score !!!!  Smile

Arjan


User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 16969 times:

Can you dump the tank in flight. Perhaps over oceans.

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17075 posts, RR: 66
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 16948 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 14):
Can you dump the tank in flight. Perhaps over oceans.

Nyet. But I'm pretty sure that's what they did back in the day.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineFlyMatt2Bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 16942 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 9):
please talk about aircraft toilets now?

Here's a fun scenario! What happens when one of the heated waste tubes collapses. Two days ago we were into the 6th hour of a 9 hour flight and one of the waste tubes collapsed. The position of the failure conveniently knocked out all available vacuum flush toilets. I guess I have to purchase a camper toilet to carry around in the future in the event this occurs again. The toilets are readily available...does anyone know where to purchase those super heavy duty bags? Yikes.

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 14):
Can you dump the tank in flight. Perhaps over oceans.

Offshore rules on waste dumping don't apply to aircraft (maybe aircraft carriers). Dumping does occur unintentionally when the blue water leaks out and freezes into a mass then drops off when the temperatures increase on descent. Just ask the people who live West of O'Hare.

Checklist:
[x] spellcheck
[ ] grammar check ???



"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4036 posts, RR: 33
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 16939 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 14):
Can you dump the tank in flight. Perhaps over oceans

No, but on vacuum systems there is a level sensor that shuts down the system when the tank is full. There is an override button for this sensor. You can then typically operate the flush one more time, and if the tank is full then the waste comes out the breather!!. Seen it happen on the ground.

But the totally separate grey water drains from the toilet and galley sinks go straight out overboard via heated drain masts.


User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 16913 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 6):
I do, however, remember him describing how some engineers at Boeing flushed an object of some kind in the forward lav, and clocked the time it took for it to reach the aft holding tank.

They then converted the time and distance into miles per hour, and although I forget the figure, I remember the maintenance tech wrapping the presentation up by professing "That's one fast turd".

If I remember correctly, didn't BA unravel a whole roll of toilet paper from a toilet/lavatory near the back of a 747 all the way up to the front, and then flush it. I believe the paper was downed in a few seconds.


User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1729 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 16909 times:

Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Reply 16):
What happens when one of the heated waste tubes collapses

Waste tubes are not heated  yuck 

As far as my personal experence, I've never seen a collapsed waste tube.
(could happen, I guess, but...)

The waste tubes used in a typical vacuum system are 2 inch diameter titanium or stainless steel with a wall thickiness between .020 and .035 inch.

Quoting AislepathLight (Thread starter):
Recently I have noticed that you have air coming in through the vents in the door,

In most cases, there should always be some air entering the lav from the cabin. There are usually two air lines attached to a lav. One providing positive air flow into the lav from either the conditioned air system or the gasper system. The other air line is connected to the lav/galley vent system and this extracts the sticky air and sends it to the outflow valve area.

The lav/galley vent airflow leaving the lav should always be more the the cond air or gasper air coming in. In addition to keeping much stinky air from entering the cabin, this is to pass the FAA smoke penetration testing requirements. This test involves putting smoke into the lav and assuring that none leaks into the cabin. To further complicate things, the air being extracted from the lav should not be alot more the air being introduced or when you put smoke into the lav to test the smoke detection system, it can be extracted too quickly and you fail that required test.

Other airflow within the lav can come from the sink drain, when this is open the pressure differential between the cabin and the outdoors cause air to flow out of the lav to the drain mast via the grey water drain system.

Old blue juice style lavs will also have the holding tank under the throne connected to the lav/galley vent system to assist with stinky removal.

Tod


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31692 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 16909 times:

Quoting 2enginesonly (Reply 13):
The old funnel and hose as used in our Coastguard Cessna 404......aim, shoot and score

Thats one Important Toilet  Smile

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 14):
Can you dump the tank in flight. Perhaps over oceans.

Not on todays Aircraft.

Quoting Bri2k1 (Reply 18):
Any Link

You are the smarty according to most,you tell us mere mortals  Smile

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1729 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 16905 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 6):
engineers at Boeing flushed an object

Canned dog food and IIRC it's over a hundred miles an hour.

Tod


User currently offlineFlyMatt2Bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 16882 times:

Quoting Tod (Reply 20):
Waste tubes are not heated

In fact on this model aircraft the fantastic newly designed vacuum system has a waste tube that is made of a synthetic material and the tube is heated. The manufacturer says the heat is the culprit that has compromised the rigidity of the tube allowing it to collapse under pressure. They have recently had a rash of these instances and when I contacted $hit support on the SAT phone at 30W they told me there was nothing I could do inflight and we were #3 to report the failure in three weeks. There is a bulletin that replaces the original tube but disconnects the heating element until a permanent fix can be approved.

No frills flights are one thing but no lav....unacceptable.



"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 16, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 16877 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR




Quoting Tod (Reply 22):
IIRC it's over a hundred miles an hour.

Yeah, that sounds about right. For some reason, I'm thinking it was 104 mph, but I'm not certain.

Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Reply 16):
The toilets are readily available...does anyone know where to purchase those super heavy duty bags? Yikes.

RV and camper supply stores come to mind...I think one is called "Camping World"...but you might also check Cabela's or Gander Mountain...




2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1729 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 16834 times:

Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Reply 23):
In fact on this model aircraft the fantastic newly designed vacuum system has a waste tube that is made of a synthetic material and the tube is heated.

Thanks for the correction. thumbsup 

What model of aircraft?

Unless the tubes were right up against the skin, why would a waste tube be heated? Even the 744 upper deck waste tubes that run right down the frame, nearly touching the stringers for over 100 inches are not heated.

Tod scratchchin 


User currently offlineFlyMatt2Bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 18, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 16772 times:

Quoting Tod (Reply 26):
In fact on this model aircraft the fantastic newly designed vacuum system has a waste tube that is made of a synthetic material and the tube is heated.

Thanks for the correction.

What model of aircraft?

BD700 Global Express XRS & 5000
The Global Express 5000 and XRS models came out in 3RD QTR 05 with many new and updated systems. The airline style vacuum toilets were introduced and I have no idea who would have thought a non-metal tube would be satisfactory in such a high pressure system.

Quoting Tod (Reply 26):
Unless the tubes were right up against the skin, why would a waste tube be heated? Even the 744 upper deck waste tubes that run right down the frame, nearly touching the stringers for over 100 inches are not heated.

Good question and I can only theorize as an operator. The Global Express aircraft operate up to FL510 and (depending upon the stage length) regularly above FL450. Perhaps they were concerned that the colder temps at those altitudes may have created a potential freezing issue.



"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offlineSkyslave From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 44 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 16745 times:

All these toilets sound too complex. Why not just have a suction tube that fastens to your anus, and fires your fecal matter out into the wild blue yonder? I mean, with all the advancements in laser targeting, we could surely get that turd within a 1 block radius of a pond or lake... or something. Am I right?

edit: Oh, and have it make that delightful *KAPOOT* sound after it exits the aircraft.

[Edited 2006-08-25 22:23:09]

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8956 posts, RR: 60
Reply 20, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 16738 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR




Quoting Skyslave (Reply 28):

I'd say it would be more efficient to harness the methane and use it to power the APU.




2H4





Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineFlyMatt2Bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 16733 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 29):
harness the methane and use it to power the APU

Then that would properly identify where the P U in APU came from in the first place.



"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offlineDoug_Or From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3424 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 16702 times:

On the subject of airborne lav science. A 737-900 can suck up a legnth of toilet paper extending to the cockpit door from the rear lav in a single flush.


When in doubt, one B pump off
User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 16660 times:

Ahhhh TP Racing  Smile I've heard so much about it and yet not been blessed with the chance to do it myself. On the first/last flights of the season when our 767s are flying empty 1 crewmember will take 1 loo roll and place it in the aft right lav and unroll it all the way forward and another crewmember will do the same on the opposite, they then see which one is the quickest.

Still there is also the olde "Tug of war", on the later 757 with the airflow system, take a loo roll and place one end in the mid left loo, and the other end in the lav on the opposite side of the isle, have a crewmember in each press at the same time and see which one got the most roll.

Anyway I've not done that, but I have a few questions and points.

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 12):
Type 1.
B737-2/3/4/5, DC9 B757 type where you sit on a tank of fluid. When you operate the flush this liquid which usually starts out blue but turns brown after a while! is circulated by a pump. The whole unit is self contained and drained via an external connection, one at a time.

I never knew that it was recycled, I guess it does explain a lot though.

Is it possible to have 5 LAVs on a 757-200, 2FWD and 3MID/AFT? I mean with a Type 1 I think it is but with the type 3 system.

Also, on most of our 75s we have type 1 lavs installed, and have 1fwd and 3 by doors 3, 2 on the left and 1 on the right. Are those 3 mid ones sharing a single tank?

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17075 posts, RR: 66
Reply 24, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 16641 times:

Quoting Doug_Or (Reply 31):
On the subject of airborne lav science. A 737-900 can suck up a legnth of toilet paper extending to the cockpit door from the rear lav in a single flush.

Sounds like a fun experiment. Next time, bring a camcorder and share the fun! Big grin



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
25 Post contains images Bohica : How about this. In the lav stick a bit of toilet paper in the lav while still on the roll. Flush the toilet and see how fast the roll spins while its
26 Post contains images HAWK21M : Heard this was done Practically too regds MEL
27 TristarSteve : No individual tanks. If you see the servicing panel door open which is on the centreline under the belly, then look for one yellow drain handle for e
28 TristarSteve : The British Airways 10 old A320 from 1988 are fitted with individual type 1 toilets. So the fwd toilet has a servicing panel under and just fwd of L1
29 Post contains images HAWK21M : On our Freighters there is just ONE Lavatory,Servicing is more longer Interval scheduled regds MEL
30 Post contains images FlyingColours : Thanks Steve, I'll take a look the next time I'm down there Phil FlyingColours
31 Post contains images CURLYHEADBOY : It used to be formaldehyde, but nowadays they use compounds that are less irritating and toxic from inhalation, such as glutaraldehyde and quaternary
32 EMBQA : There are two basic types. Recycling and Vaccum. Recycling is found on smaller regional aircraft. E145, CRJ, Saab, ATR, Dash8..etc. It's just a holdi
33 Bobster2 : CO2 solid + heat --> CO2 gas Very simple. Water in the toilet provides the heat. Gas takes up much bigger volume than sold. Expanding gas forces wate
34 Post contains images Starlionblue : As I recall, the "old BA 320s" were taken over from British Caledonian. In contrast with the newer 320s at BA, they were the rare -100 version. Perha
35 CURLYHEADBOY : True, I stand corrected.
36 Post contains links 320tech : Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 11): Waste of Thread space Any Link regds BRI Waste of Thread Space
37 TristarSteve : All A320 have vacuum as standard. But in 1987 vacuum toilets were a new idea and not very reliable so BCAL went for the option of recycling toilets.
38 777WT : Thanks for reminding me that morning I worked on 2 nose wheel R&R on a ERJ-170. I had my toolbox on the r/h side by the nose. While I took the ac out
39 777WT : Someone tell em what a "rocket motor" does in the lav system? I watched mythbusters and they were doing tests on an tiolet system to see if it's possi
40 HAWK21M : Ram Air & Pack Air are seperate,Very Unlikely that Coffee smell would arise from there.A mess on the Heat Exchangers could be a possibility leading t
41 Lincoln : I'm not sure if it's related, but on the ex-Presidential 707 at the Musuem of Flight in Washington there's (still) a note in one of the galleys from
42 HAWK21M : Some older B737s had the Fwd Toilet sink drain greywater drain into the Commode tank instead of an overboard drain. regds MEL
43 Post contains images FlyingColours : We are told not to pour Milk, Cofee, Tea, Juice etc down the galley sinks because it clogs the pipes, instead we have to pour them down the toilet. B
44 TristarSteve : No it is definitely to stop clogging. Most galley sinks have filters and these get blocked with coffee grounds and wine and milk. They are essential
45 OlegShv : I've seen a documentary on building the A380 recently. They showed the tests for their toilet system. It's of vacuum type, and it only takes a couple
46 Tod : JL gave Boeing a lot of grief over this when the received their first 744. Due the flat fuselage shape, the forward (STA 860) drain mast discharge te
47 HAWK21M : The risk is capacity.same can overflow if not monitored. regds MEL
48 CRJ900 : On the CRJ700/900, does the blue-juice lavs have a common collecting tank below the rear cabin or is all the waste stored under each lav bowl as it ha
49 Bri2k1 : Are these numerous drains open to the atmosphere all the time? If so, I can see why they would need to be small, as they would place an additional lo
50 Tod : On the commercial aircraft I deal with, the drains leave the aircraft via either two of three drain masts. Each of these mast either have one or two
51 474218 : Air Canada L-1011-1's had heater blankets installed on their waste tanks. The heaters, which only operated on the ground, prevented the fluid from fr
52 Post contains images Tod : Slow-cooking poop Ribbon heaters on 747 grey water and 767 potable water fill tubes have also gone up in flames. In some cases it was caused be debri
53 DC8FriendShip : It is stored right below where you sit. The tank is not very big, maybe 10 -15 gallons. In heavy checks we pull the entire lav out, including the wal
54 Post contains images CRJ900 : Great, thanx Next question: can those lavs be put anywhere in the cabin as they are "self-contained" or must they be installed where they are on most
55 DC8FriendShip : Technically speaking, yes they could be moved to another location and made to work. But the service point, dump tube, and handle assembly would all h
56 Tristarsteve : On the B777 the grey water drains are closed off by a motor operated valve. A head of pressure in the pipe causes it to open to let the water out and
57 HAWK21M : Dumping Grey water in Air should not be a problem.Some Earlier B737s do that thru their drain masts.As long as its not Lavatory water no ones complai
58 Tod : Just about ever plane does. Even the 777. What the valve accomplishes is that it cuts down on the cabin noise caused by whistling drains. In the past
59 Sprout5199 : After reading this thread(WHY? I do not know), I know more about aircraft sh!tters than I really wanted to know. On the same token, on the ship I was
60 TristarSteve : Well I learnt something today. I have just flown on an Icelandair B757-200 with vacuum toilet system. TF-FIP. Definitely a dash 200 and definitely a
61 Tod : I don't know which ones got the vacuum system, but the data I have for the vacuum toilet assembly shows the 757 applicibility being added in 1997. TF
62 TristarSteve : Thanks for that.
63 HAWK21M : Most of the later versions have adopted the Vacuum type. regds MEL
64 Tod : Do the converted freighters you've seen keep the vacuum system or replace it with a blue juice lav up front? Tod
65 HAWK21M : The Ones We work on have got the recirculation type in the Fwd Lav.The Rest are deleted.Makes sense on a freighter. regds MEL
66 Post contains images FlyingColours : Yup a few of ours have the vacuum type, they are a lot more forgiving if you happen to drop something in there (I lost a bev pot lid in a recycle one
67 HAWK21M : Wouldn't it be the other way. regds MEL
68 FlyingColours : Well if you drop something into a vacum one you simply don't flush and go get a pair of gloves, instead of the recycle where it goes straight down th
69 Post contains links ZKEYE : See this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-CfVzx3sro and this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChOqoMmWAkc&mode=related&search= and this http://www.yout
70 HAWK21M : This trick has been tried out in Mx & works great on the Vaccum types. regds MEL
71 Brewha : Is there a formula designers use to estimate the lav waste storage capacity requirements? For example if I had a model that holds 500 people and has l
72 Starlionblue : Here's a little movie showing the test installation of the waste system on the A380. It is quite a good visualization of the system. Note the little p
73 JoseKMLB : As a ramp agent, I would just like to ask for your help by not throwing cans, diaper's, cups, and shyt down the lavs because its a real pain in the as
74 HAWK21M : Also Don't drop your cell phone in the Tank too regds MEL
75 Brewha : Does anyone know what the standard commercial wide-bodied toilet storage tank capacity is? Those tanks on the 380-800 look like two, 25-gallon tanks -
76 Acidradio : My old employer had a "lav control" desk in operations. Pretty neat idea, especially in a hub where you have so many lavs which need to be taken care
77 EMBQA : Most aircraft recycle the fluid as the waste passes through a solids separator....another joy to clean and inspect. The fluid just gets reused.....
78 TristarSteve : Our B777 have 3 waste tanks. The fwd and mid hold 83galls and the aft 63 galls of waste. Each is connected to 4 toilets. The reason the aft is smalle
79 EMBQA : Ooops.I stand corrected. I forgot the 'fresh water' comes from the potable tank[Edited 2008-07-04 08:49:12]
80 BWilliams : Man, that's gotta be a shitty job... Very interesting information, all... probably more then I need to know about air-johns, but interesting none-the
81 COTPARampGuy : Shhhhh, don't tell MX or CO but that is the truth.
82 HAWK21M : Any Aircraft type that drains the Potable sink water to the Recirculating liquid Lavatory tank or are all drained overboard via drain mast or port? re
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