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US Vs Metric Units On A/C  
User currently offlineCoal From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2016 posts, RR: 9
Posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 5563 times:

After looking at this pic


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Photo © EDDL Photography



I started wondering which units on the a/c's system could be different in US and Metric. Surely all a/c measure height in feet, speed in knots, and temp in celsius.

Which systems would be different?

Coal


Nxt Flts: VA SYD-CBR-SYD | VA SYD-OOL-SYD | JQ SYD-MEL | VA MEL-CBR-SYD | DL SYD-LAX-ATL-MIA | B6 FLL-DCA-BOS | DL BOS-L
80 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAndrej From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 927 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 5447 times:

These preferences are airline specific and differ among airlines. For example engine temps, can be also measured in fahrenheits as well as outside temps. Also fuel on board are measured in Kilos or pounds. There are many other preferences airlines choose when they are ordering new airplanes.

Cheers,
Andrej


User currently offlineLH648 From Kazakhstan, joined Sep 2006, 577 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 5399 times:

As 319 is "software" plane, is it not possible easily switch to metric system?...


I hate Lufthansa
User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4817 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 5326 times:

Quoting Coal (Thread starter):
I started wondering which units on the a/c's system could be different in US and Metric. Surely all a/c measure height in feet, speed in knots, and temp in celsius.

Which systems would be different?

Well Russian aircraft operate entirely in metric.

Its a pity that aviation hasn't converted over.
Imperial measurements are so antique and inefficient!
At least temps are in Celcius.
As for speed and distances, it depends what you are talking about...
because in aviation these are actually usually in Nautical Miles or Knots (nm/h). Nautical miles are neither metric nor imperial, they are degree based (ie divide the earth up into degrees,minutes etc. But things like runway lengths and altitude should have all been switched over to metric a long time ago. It is only because of the USA/UK that we still have Imperial measurements...the rest of the world uses metric for everything else.



56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlineFrancoBlanco From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5252 times:

Basically weight (fuel and payload) and temperature can be either displayed in Metric or U.S. units (°C/°F and kgs/lbs). Regarding weight it is rather important to know which units you are using (see the Gimli Glider), hence the sticker on the aircraft in question.

I am sure that it is not that difficult to change the software on a modern Airbus, on the other hand there is no switch or whatsoever in the cockpit. Maybe it's possible to change it on a 777 via the maintenance console behind the F/O seat, can anyone of the 777 specialists confirm that?

Air Berlin has added that specific A319 only recently, so there may have not been time yet to perform the change. If you click on the reg of that aircraft, you'll see that it still has the original Independence Air interior.

Sebastian


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3998 posts, RR: 34
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Quoting FrancoBlanco (Reply 4):
Maybe it's possible to change it on a 777 via the maintenance console behind the F/O seat

No its not that easy. It is controlled by pin programming. i.e. you have to physically move the pins in a multi plug so that they connect to the kgs output instead of the lbs output from the fuel quantity computor. It could be accomplished during the first maint stop, once the SB has been approved.
When I worked for GF we leased some TWA Tristars. We changed all the fuel gauges to Kgs instead of lbs to make them the same as the rest.


User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5688 posts, RR: 44
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5184 times:
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If the second country to adopt the metric system had completed the change over then the last country to adopt would have been forced into changng as well!


If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineEDDL From Germany, joined Dec 2002, 738 posts, RR: 16
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5175 times:

Thank you for bringing this up (it's my photo).

Looking on the large version I see the fuel figures are measured in lbs. I am not sure about the temperature (C vs. F). Note the calculators next to both side sticks ...

Quoting LH648 (Reply 2):
As 319 is "software" plane, is it not possible easily switch to metric system?...

I have asked this myself, shouldn't be too difficult to change measuring units in maintenance checks.

Phil / EDDL


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17015 posts, RR: 67
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5148 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 3):
It is only because of the USA/UK that we still have Imperial measurements...the rest of the world uses metric for everything else.

The UK is officially metric, with a few exceptions. The three countries in the world officially still using Imperial are USA, Myanmar and St. Lucia. The US Military is metric (apart from aviation?).

The reason the US has been able to keep Imperial for so long is because of its enormous domestic market. The same "tactic" would not have worked for a small country that exports a large proportion of production.

Will the US ever go metric? I think so, but it will take a long time. Also, computerization actually makes dual standards easier since conversion can be pushbutton.

There are also big variations apart from the metric/imperial thing. For example, the international standard for dates is year/month/day but is not universally implemented. The international standard for decimal notation is the comma; same here. The standard for low-beam headlights is used in all countries except the USA. The list goes on.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineCoal From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2016 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5129 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
The reason the US has been able to keep Imperial for so long is because of its enormous domestic market.

 checkmark 

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
Will the US ever go metric? I think so, but it will take a long time.

Ummm... I don't think so. Canada did, but their population is only 1/10th of the US'. Still, it cost them a lot of money. People in the US are as confused with the metric system just as the rest of the world is confused with imperial.

Coal



Nxt Flts: VA SYD-CBR-SYD | VA SYD-OOL-SYD | JQ SYD-MEL | VA MEL-CBR-SYD | DL SYD-LAX-ATL-MIA | B6 FLL-DCA-BOS | DL BOS-L
User currently offlineCPHGuard From Denmark, joined Jun 2006, 278 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5109 times:

Am i wrong, when i say the new Boeings are metric ???

I remember an incident where a 767 made an emergency landing due to fuel starvation. As far as i remember it was due to a miscalculation, based on the airplane being metric.

But i could be wrong.

Regards
Thomas


User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5688 posts, RR: 44
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5083 times:
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Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
The three countries in the world officially still using Imperial are USA, Myanmar and St. Lucia. The US Military is metric (apart from aviation?).

Not quite true, The USA was the 2nd country in the world to adopt the Metric systrem, an act of congress in 1860 decreed that all govt business be conducted in the Metric system and and a further act in in 1873 (Ibelive these dates are accurate but may vary by a year ir so) adpoted the metric systema s the official units of measure in the USA, they just never really enforced it.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
The standard for low-beam headlights is used in all countries except the USA

Curious about this one??



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineTeamAmerica From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 1761 posts, RR: 23
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5047 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 3):
Imperial measurements are so antique and inefficient

I also prefer metric, but let's not be snobs about it. Antique is not a bad thing, and metric (S.I.) is not new. As for efficiency, imperial units such as feet or gallons are more easily halved/quartered etc. . The metric system excels for scientific pursuits, but on the level of human commerce the imperial system can be quite convenient.

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 3):
But things like runway lengths and altitude should have all been switched over to metric a long time ago. It is only because of the USA/UK that we still have Imperial measurements...the rest of the world uses metric for everything else

Please don't assign blame. There is an obvious safety issue in converting things like runway lengths. Given that the system works as-is, why change it? Using feet may be an anacronism, but so what? It's just a number. So long as the meaning is understood the units are of no significance, and no politics should attach.

Quoting Coal (Reply 9):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
Will the US ever go metric? I think so, but it will take a long time.

Ummm... I don't think so. Canada did, but their population is only 1/10th of the US'. Still, it cost them a lot of money. People in the US are as confused with the metric system just as the rest of the world is confused with imperial

I pray you are wrong. Our failure to get with the program is hampering our products in the world market. As for the US population being confused, there is no excuse for this. The metric system has been taught in our schools since the 70's! People are too stubborn and foolishly attach emotions to issues like this.



Failure is not an option; it's an outcome.
User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5031 times:

Converted loads of A/C from US to EU and I can tell it's a lot of work.
Some parts contain both standards and then it's just a matter of program pinning.
Other parts need a software change which is not bad either.
Biggest and most time consuming problem is that all overhead switch on/off notations are the other way around which requires the replacement of all lighting panels, 180 degree switch rotation and/or wiring changes.



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5002 times:

Quoting CPHGuard (Reply 10):
Am i wrong, when i say the new Boeings are metric ???

I'm afraid so. It's an option, not a standard.  Smile

Quoting CPHGuard (Reply 10):
I remember an incident where a 767 made an emergency landing due to fuel starvation. As far as i remember it was due to a miscalculation, based on the airplane being metric.

Yes...

Quoting FrancoBlanco (Reply 4):
Regarding weight it is rather important to know which units you are using (see the Gimli Glider), hence the sticker on the aircraft in question.

... but I think the miscalculation wasn't just between metric and imperial weights, it was between fuel weight and fuel volume.


User currently offlineEDDL From Germany, joined Dec 2002, 738 posts, RR: 16
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5002 times:

Quoting Aviopic (Reply 13):
Biggest and most time consuming problem is that all overhead switch on/off notations are the other way around

Any reason for this?


User currently offline3201 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 4982 times:

It's almost universal to use C for temperature and NM for distance. Beyond that, most individual airplanes are either "pounds" or "kilos," and use those units consistently. Plenty of airlines have mixed fleets between lb and kg aircraft, although usually (but not always!) a single aircraft type has a single unit. Flight levels are still in "feet" (they're pressure altitudes, not geometric) for most of the world, but in China, Russia, and some other places, the flight levels are numbers of meters, but ICAO filing strips still show the feet equivalent. One of the oddest things about the units used is mixing feet for altitude with C for termperature -- you never do that in university, it's either all metric or all English, and the tables in the back of textbooks are all useless, you gotta do your own conversions.

Quoting CPHGuard (Reply 10):
Am i wrong, when i say the new Boeings are metric ???

They can be whichever -- still gotta support both as a manufacturer.

One more quick random point: NM actually make sense, vs. KM, since they have a relevant physical meaning (think degrees of latitude)


User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 17, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4954 times:

Quoting EDDL (Reply 15):
Any reason for this?

Don't know really, not even whether this is standard for the US or just limited to a few US airliners.
Anyway the rest of the world standard is "flip up = on" and "down = off" which required modification of all ex American Airlines and US Airways F100's leaving the US.



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 18, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4914 times:

Quoting 3201 (Reply 16):
NM actually make sense, vs. KM, since they have a relevant physical meaning (think degrees of latitude)

I know it's what you meant but, more specifically, 1NM = 1 minute of lattitude.


User currently offlineZRH From Switzerland, joined Nov 1999, 5566 posts, RR: 36
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4896 times:

Quoting TeamAmerica (Reply 12):
As for efficiency, imperial units such as feet or gallons are more easily halved/quartered

????? This is bullshit. You have a liter which is 100cl or 1000ml. The half of it is 50cl or 500ml. Half a gallon is what? Or a meter has 100cm or 1000mm, the half of it is 50cm or 500mm. What is a half foot or yard. At the metric system you always can add or take a zero. It is most easy to calculate. But for example with the imperial system a foot has 12 inch, etc. Much more difficult to calculate.


User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4880 times:

Quoting EDDL (Reply 15):
Quoting Aviopic (Reply 13):
Biggest and most time consuming problem is that all overhead switch on/off notations are the other way around

Any reason for this?

European switches have always been Up = Off and Down = On. In the USA, it's the other way around.

Mark


User currently offlineEDDL From Germany, joined Dec 2002, 738 posts, RR: 16
Reply 21, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4880 times:

Quoting Aviopic (Reply 17):
Don't know really, not even whether this is standard for the US or just limited to a few US airliners.
Anyway the rest of the world standard is "flip up = on" and "down = off" which required modification of all ex American Airlines and US Airways F100's leaving the US.



Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 20):
European switches have always been Up = Off and Down = On. In the USA, it's the other way around.

Thank you for the information!

Phil / EDDL


User currently offlineTeamAmerica From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 1761 posts, RR: 23
Reply 22, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4851 times:

Quoting ZRH (Reply 19):
????? This is bullshit. You have a liter which is 100cl or 1000ml. The half of it is 50cl or 500ml. Half a gallon is what? Or a meter has 100cm or 1000mm, the half of it is 50cm or 500mm. What is a half foot or yard. At the metric system you always can add or take a zero. It is most easy to calculate. But for example with the imperial system a foot has 12 inch, etc. Much more difficult to calculate

Excuse me, but its not bullshit. Most imperial measures originated from commercial usage, and "ease of use" was the only justification for the units. If you look at an english ruler, you see 12 inches. You can easily divide that into halves, thirds, or quarters...that is exactly why the foot was broken into 12 subunits; ease of division with no math required. I'm not arguing that imperial units are superior, just that they are not so bizarre as some suggest.

I'm an engineer. I do all my work in metric. I insist others do the same, which makes me very much out of step here in the US and causes me endless issues with vendors. The only difference between us, if any, is that I place no emotional stake in imperial vs. metric.



Failure is not an option; it's an outcome.
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17015 posts, RR: 67
Reply 23, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4826 times:

Quoting StealthZ (Reply 11):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 8):
The standard for low-beam headlights is used in all countries except the USA

Curious about this one??

Absolutely. In the rest of the world, the low-beams do not leak any light above a certain defined level. So you will never get glare as you are approaching from the front of another car (unless you are crawling on hands and knees). In the US, low-beams shine some light above this level. Basically, the US system moves the one filament (out of the two) to a position where it will shine out of the casing in a downward direction. This still allows glare upwards since some light bounces off the bottom of the reflector. The traditional rest of the world system blocks light from reflecting upwards in low-beam operation, although modern lamps are a bit more advanced than that.

There are pros and cons to both. US low-beams shed more light but are worse for oncoming cars. Rest of the world low-beams are the other way around. Also, the US system renders the creation of a specific low-beam emission more difficult. Needless to say, there are passionate proponents on both sides.

I am used to the European system, so driving in the US at night is a bit disconcerting. I feel like I'm being blinded all the time. A habit thing I am sure.

There's some good info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headlights#Dual-beam_headlamps

Quoting CPHGuard (Reply 10):

I remember an incident where a 767 made an emergency landing due to fuel starvation. As far as i remember it was due to a miscalculation, based on the airplane being metric.

The Gimli Glider. As Mr L mentions, more of a weigh vs volume screwup than imperial vs metric.

Quoting TeamAmerica (Reply 12):
As for efficiency, imperial units such as feet or gallons are more easily halved/quartered etc.

That's just because they are used that way. In my experience, Americans use fractions more in commerce/construction/etc... Europeans use decimals. Just a habit.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineCEO@AFG From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 245 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4814 times:

As I live in the UK at the moment, I've found the switches in the UK are also on when down and off when up, which is the reverse compared to what I'm used with from Norway.

Another strange quirk which I simply cannot get my head round, is when debating the weight of a person here in the UK. It is not done in kilos or even pounds which I can roughly convert in my head by halving it, oh no. It's done in stones, whatever that is.

I even asked when someone said they were 10stones 4pounds, how much that is in just pounds, for me to get my head round the figure, even they couldn't convert it.

Metric is always easier, like ZRH said, it's just moving the komma.

1l
10dl
100cl
1000ml

1m
10dm
100cm
1000mm



"Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue." Steven McCroskey, Airplane!
25 Post contains images Coal : Hampering our products? Like which ones? If this is true, the world's products would be hampered in the US market. Yeah, but there are sooo many othe
26 Carduelis : Not that they're used in aviation, but can anybody remind me of the difference between a US Gallon and an Imperial Gallon? Something like a US gallon
27 AsstChiefMark : 5 US quarts = 1 imperial gallon
28 Post contains links Starlionblue : 1 stone = 14 pounds. Note that the plural of the weight unit "stone" is "stone". As I said, simply tradition and habit. In the US, our contactrors al
29 Post contains images David L : Some places in Europe cheat by having toggle buttons. Thank you Mr. Blue, or is that Mr. Lionblue, or Mr. Hunter?
30 TeamAmerica : You mean welcome to the place where intelligent people will argue about anything, no matter how small. My point was that the imperial system evolved
31 Starlionblue : Well, at least in the loony_bin forum. I tend to stay away from that one. This has not stopped carpenters on either side of the pond from being just
32 Post contains images Coal : Oh, like you? You still haven't answered my questions, you ungrateful jerk. Coal
33 TeamAmerica : True. Another problem with "US measures" is that there isn't a proper name for it, so we wind up using terms like "english" or "imperial" even though
34 Post contains images David L : Yes, the flight software. That's what was being discussed. I doubt very much that the manufacturing processes are optional.
35 Robsawatsky : The origins of the imperial system including inch and foot are hotly debated with no universally agreed upon etymology. While your assertion about "p
36 TeamAmerica : Yes, I agree. I did not mean to suggest "ease of calculation" at all. Just as you say, it's that the multiples of 2, 3, and 4 tend to be handy in com
37 Starlionblue : Agreed. And in Europe the "standard lengths" are simply different but probably just as intuitively practical. One of my favorite measurement standard
38 SlamClick : I can't think of any good reason to go to Celsius for temperature. It is just as bogus as Fahrenheit. We should adopt either Kelvin or Rankine, prefer
39 Post contains images David L : "Correct me if I'm wrong but..." weren't the UK components of Concorde manufactured to imperial units (or at least some of them) while the French com
40 Post contains images Starlionblue : Dear god yes. "Twice as hot" based on an arbitrary measure. Sometimes being a geek takes serious discipline. At least Celsius used to be based on the
41 David L : In everyday life it's a convenient scale relative to what we experience but it's clumsy when comparing the temperature of liquid helium to the temper
42 Post contains links and images TeamAmerica : Searching the forum archives I found a posting that said that Airbus uses "standard" fasteners, listing the sizes in metric (e.g. 6.35mm rather than 1
43 Post contains images Starlionblue : Ah yes. The decimal clock. Well, some things just refuse to change I guess. Ironically, the current method timekeeping is almost, but not quite, in s
44 Post contains images Zkpilot : Most countries around the world would say that today is the 08/09/06 ie the 8th of Sept 2006. Take a look at your passport next time... comma?? I've
45 Post contains images TeamAmerica : Agreed that metric is clearly superior for nearly all purposes. Not conceded that dividing by 10 is relevant to all things, which is entirely my poin
46 MarkC : First, let me apologize for getting back on topic. Some of the engine components are designed by companies that use metric. These are converted to US
47 Post contains images Starlionblue : Well, I was talking about the international standard, not what is actually used in a lot of countries. My passport is Swedish so it uses the the ISO
48 Kaddyuk : The airbus manuals show metric values... Its not just items in the Cockpit. All of my tools are UNF Imperial. 3/8ths, 7/16ths etc etc... If they chan
49 Post contains images Starlionblue : Not so sure. It might never end, or maybe it will. But it won't be settled in the next 20 years
50 CALPilot : That is not correct. Every Boeing, MD, airliner built in the US, for a US airline that I have flown is switch down for on. Every Airbus I've flown or
51 Post contains images Starlionblue : You mean "American standard way".
52 Tod : It isn't, they haven't. Tod
53 TheSonntag : In fact, the metre originally was also based with the earth in mind, even if the definition today is different. As Wikipedia states, "the circumferen
54 Starlionblue : As TheSonntag mentions, the original basis for the metre is 1/1000000th of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator along the Paris Meridian.
55 Jetlagged : Boeing would happily build aircraft with switches up or down (and prossibly sideways) for on if asked. I've seen 747 Classics with a mixture of switc
56 Starlionblue : Weird. But I'm sure they come from separate traditions. What always amuses me is how for every design decision that was made, perhaps randomly, decad
57 320tech : On the Dash-8, switches are "on" towards the windscreen, a system I found very easy to learn. On the A320, up is "on" regardless of where the switch i
58 Post contains images Starlionblue : Well, by definition that nut is the "sh**ty one". Amen. Just like learning a language, learning a measurement system is best done before the teens. S
59 Post contains images Troubleshooter : ...I realised that I worked on this ship a few days before...
60 BoeingOnFinal : That is true. I worked formaly as a carpenter, and I though that the metric system was easy to use. Allthough for material thickness and wideness, we
61 Post contains images David L : Methinks you've left out a '0' there. There's where a thousands separator might have come in handy, e,g, 1/10,000,000th. I haven't "picked a good nit
62 Pihero : Right, David. One wee bit of history that has been lost is that the "revolution" metric system went as far as decimalising the trig : a right angle w
63 TristarSteve : We got stuck last year on an A320 interchanging the yellow and blue hyd pumps (for MEL dispatch). We got both the pumps out, but then had to change o
64 Post contains images David L : I have calculators that can work with grads but I never did find out why.
65 Post contains images Starlionblue : Damnit! Fine, going with ISO standard notation: 1/10 000 000. See? no need for confusing non-decimal commas. Having gone to French school, I actually
66 TheSonntag : You did? In which respect, did you have to solve tests at school using it? In Germany and Denmark, we never used it, I only remember that our teacher
67 Post contains images 777236ER : That's not really true. Celcius is defined in two ways. 0.01 degrees C is the triple point of water, and each 1 degree C step is defined as 1/273.16
68 Post contains images Starlionblue : It was when we were doing geometry. Like 4th-5th grade somewhere. Basically we had to be familiar with the concept. I can't recall if it came up in t
69 Post contains links WSOY : The Finnish Air Force recently converted their cockpits to Imperial from Metric for NATO compatibility. http://www.verkkouutiset.fi/arkistoj....php?i
70 HKA : Not sure if this has already been discussed above, but majority of mistakes in engineering calculations are done when converting from one unit system
71 Post contains images Asturias : As has been mentioned here before, the meter also had a direct physical meaning. 1 km being 1/10 000th of the distance from a pole to the equator. No
72 Post contains images Starlionblue : I recently measured some two-by-fours and noticed that they are not quite two by four. More like 1,8 x 3,7 or something. Weird but I'm sure there's a
73 Tod : 2x4 inch is the nominal raw stock size, final cut size controlled at 1.62 x 3.62 inch, but still refered to now by incorrect nomenclature anyway. Jus
74 Zkpilot : agreed. The reason for this is because it is a simple system that is interchangable easily. Hell even the US military uses it.
75 Pihero : Your comment introduces the-failed- attempt to use centesimal degrees , or "grads" by the fathers of the metric system. In other words, a right angle
76 Post contains images Jonty : officially yes, but I don't know anyone who actually uses it in everyday life! I'm one of the ones who was taught it at school, but I don't use it! I
77 Starlionblue : Oh sure. It's only really an issue for expatriates like me and those who have to work in multiple systems. As we see more internationalization of pro
78 Post contains images TheSonntag : No, but it is better than the KG definition, which is: 1 kg is the weight of the international kg prototype As said before, 1 metre was defined in an
79 Lincoln : Yeah...and every once in a while someone tries forcing the issue it it just gets people more confused and pissed off...not a good combination for a p
80 Zeke : Every unit that is in blue on the system pages can be changed. Common differences : lb and kg for mass and mass rates deg F and deg C for temps QNH i
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