Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Weight Of B737 Emergency Exit...  
User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 25
Posted (7 years 12 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5957 times:

Flying home from manchester earlier today, I was sat in the exit row, next to the escape door... I was wondering how heavy is that door and would it take more than one person to get it outside the aircraft?

Once the hatch is open, how do you escape from the wing? should you slide down the flaps or is there an emergency slide?

Thanks!


Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (7 years 12 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5953 times:

Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
Flying home from manchester earlier today, I was sat in the exit row, next to the escape door... I was wondering how heavy is that door and would it take more than one person to get it outside the aircraft?

The placard on the door should have said the weight... my guess, 20-30lbs.

Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
Once the hatch is open, how do you escape from the wing? should you slide down the flaps or is there an emergency slide?

Most smaller planes you slide down the flaps.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (7 years 12 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 5907 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 1):
The placard on the door should have said the weight... my guess, 20-30lbs.

Now I hate to admit this having sat in the exit row countless times, I've noticed it on the 737 classics and other fleet types (752/753, ERJ for instance)...do the NGs have a placarded weight, or since they're pull-n-go is there no weight to speak of?

As an aside, anyone have video of opening an NG exit? From what I've heard, they open with enough force to pull you out of the aircraft if you make the mistake of hanging on.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (7 years 12 months 20 hours ago) and read 5849 times:

Are you referring to the Classics or NGs.If its the Former I think 10-15kgs,as you need to pull it indoors as its a plug type.On the NGs no such issue as its power asisted outward opening upwards.
The Escape path is go aft & slide on the TE flaps.Unless theres a fire.Theres no Emergency Slide only an Emergency Rope thats hooked to the upper side of the wing,as a handhold.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMiamiair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 12 months 20 hours ago) and read 5842 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 1):
The placard on the door should have said the weight... my guess, 20-30lbs.

You win the prize... 35 pounds. (ref: 737 CMM 52-26-01)


User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 12 months 20 hours ago) and read 5840 times:

Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
I was wondering how heavy is that door and would it take more than one person to get it outside the aircraft?

Ive heard of people taking souvenir's of their flight, but come on....!


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (7 years 12 months 19 hours ago) and read 5833 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 3):
Are you referring to the Classics or NGs.If its the Former I think 10-15kgs,as you need to pull it indoors as its a plug type



Quoting Miamiair (Reply 4):
You win the prize... 35 pounds. (ref: 737 CMM 52-26-01)

10-15kgs = 22-33lbs.How about sharing It. Smile
BTW what about the Weight of the NG Emergency Exit doors.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineMiamiair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 5820 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 6):
BTW what about the Weight of the NG Emergency Exit doors.

50 pounds = 22.7 Kgs


User currently offlineShamrock_747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 5673 times:

Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
I was wondering how heavy is that door and would it take more than one person to get it outside the aircraft?

I've operated one before and it is very heavy. A small person with little arm strength would probably struggle with it but in a real emergency with adrenalin pumping I'm sure just about anyone could do it.

Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
Once the hatch is open, how do you escape from the wing? should you slide down the flaps or is there an emergency slide?

There is no slide at the wings. In an evacuation you would have to jump off the back of the wing or slide down the flaps.


User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 5608 times:

I mght be paranoid again, but why are these questions about emrg exit handling popping up now?

New plans to bring a plane down? Or just doing research about methods?

Ok, I'll creep back to my guard dog house now....



The conveyor belt plane will fly
User currently offlineTWAL1011727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 629 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 5581 times:

Quoting Shamrock_747 (Reply 8):
Quoting Kaddyuk (Thread starter):
I was wondering how heavy is that door and would it take more than one person to get it outside the aircraft?

I've operated one before and it is very heavy. A small person with little arm strength would probably struggle with it but in a real emergency with adrenalin pumping I'm sure just about anyone could do it.

Comair had a EMB120(Brasilia) do a gear up landing at MCO. The pilot stopped the A/C perfectly on the centerline of the runway. Granted the EMB120 door isn't that big but a pax seated in the emergency exit row opened the exit(when told to) and tossed the exit out the opening. It landed in the grass - 60 feet away from the A/C !!
Yes....adrenaline is amazing stuff. Grandmas have lifted cars off their grandchildren before.

KD


User currently offlineCM767 From Panama, joined Dec 2004, 654 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 5329 times:

Quoting Shamrock_747 (Reply 8):
I've operated one before and it is very heavy. A small person with little arm strength would probably struggle with it but in a real emergency with adrenalin pumping I'm sure just about anyone could do it.

If I recall correctly that was not the case on a 737 accident on Manchester, and I believe that's why on the NG, the over the wing doors swing out. A woman was trapped when the door fell on her.

Please correct if anyone has a better recollection of that accident.



But The Best Thing God Has Created Is A New Day
User currently offlineJamie757 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 5306 times:

Forgive the question, but during an overwing evacuation, is there not a risk of encountering jetblast from an engine that may still be running? Is the evacuation command given after engine shutdown? What if an engine cannot be shut down?

Rgds.


User currently offlineAtlamt From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 240 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 5286 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 6):
BTW what about the Weight of the NG Emergency Exit doors.

But the NG doors are hinged at the top and are spring loaded to open once released. So even though it's heavier it's much eaiser to open and get out.



Fwd to MCO and Placard
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1472 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 5281 times:

Quoting Atlamt (Reply 13):
Forgive the question, but during an overwing evacuation, is there not a risk of encountering jetblast from an engine that may still be running? Is the evacuation command given after engine shutdown? What if an engine cannot be shut down?

Yes, the risk is present, but in almost all evacuation "scenarios" I've been trained in, the pilots run through the emergency evac. checklist which is pasted on the control column and includes engine shutdown.

Generally, Flight Attendants wait until the evacation command from the Flight Deck which would occur once engines were shut down (i.e the Captain felt it was safe to commence evacuation).

The only time we are told to begin an evacuation UNcommanded from the Flight Deck is when another crew member has commenced an evacuation, or when we detect life threatening conditions in the cabin (at which point) we would repeatedly ring the FD with a series of chimes on the interphone signaling the need to evacuate and once the A/C came to a complete stop and engines shut off, we would commence the evacuation.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineBobster2 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 5253 times:

Quoting Jamie757 (Reply 12):
Is the evacuation command given after engine shutdown?

Sometimes the evacuation is initiated by the passengers, even while the plane is still moving. When there's smoke, the passengers tend to panic and all the flight crew's training goes out the window, so to speak.  Smile

One time an engine made a long bang during the boarding process at the gate. Passengers went out the overwing exits and they jumped out the rear doors. Flight attendants had to step aside to keep from getting trampled.


User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1472 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 5244 times:

Quoting Bobster2 (Reply 15):
Sometimes the evacuation is initiated by the passengers, even while the plane is still moving. When there's smoke, the passengers tend to panic and all the flight crew's training goes out the window, so to speak.

Depending on how many pax were panicking I would simply give the FD the EVAC signal and initiate the evacuation myself....once the A/C stops of course.

Once mass hysteria sets in it's pointless to try and stop it, far easier to simply follow through. As far as flight crew training going out the window...I'm sure it has happened, but we are DRILLED repeatedly so it's second nature to go into your evac mode. Granted no evacuation is likely to be textbook (ie your exit my be a hole in the fuselage and NOT an actual exit) but you still know what needs to be done.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineMarkHKG From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 5244 times:

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 14):
we would repeatedly ring the FD with a series of chimes on the interphone signaling the need to evacuate and once the A/C

Or on other aircraft the evacuation alarm is sounded. Usually makes a loud *beep beep beep* noise along with a flashing EVAC light on some crew panels.

Quoting Bobster2 (Reply 15):
Sometimes the evacuation is initiated by the passengers

The 727 is apparently NOTORIOUS for scaring the passengers into starting an uncommanded evacuation. The torching of the APU can been seen by the pax and some well intentioned people may start opening exits.

Quoting Bobster2 (Reply 15):
Flight attendants had to step aside to keep from getting trampled.

In one unwarrented evacuation case, a pax physically LIFTED the flight attendant OUT OF THE WAY (although she was telling him to stop), put her aside, and opened the floor level exit...yes, while the engines were running. This was publicized after 9/11 since it was pointed out that sometimes you NEED TO LISTEN TO YOUR CABIN CREW instead of taking "heroic" action!



Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
User currently offlineBobster2 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 5242 times:

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 16):
As far as flight crew training going out the window...

That part of my message was meant as an innocent joke. I was picturing passengers going out the window and "going out the window" has a double meaning.  Smile


User currently offlineTheJoe From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 61 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 5172 times:

Most of my experience has been working on 737-300, -400 and -800's. The plug door on the classics are quite awkward to handle, even installing them and removing them for maintenance purposes without any pressure at all! I imagine that it would be a lot harder for a passengers under pressure who have never removed it before in their lives!

I believe the door on the "New Gen" is a much better design in my opinion. They are spring loaded, so all a passenger would have to do in an emergency is pull the handle, and the door will spring open! With regard to what Lincoln posted on Tue Sep 26:

"As an aside, anyone have video of opening an NG exit? From what I've heard, they open with enough force to pull you out of the aircraft if you make the mistake of hanging on."

I have opened them many times before, I'm about 6'1 and 95kg so I've never found myself across the other side of the hangar. They do pack a bit of force though, so if you only weighed 45kg and wasn't expecting it, you may find yourself out on the wing a little faster than you first thought!

The only question this new design poses is what is to stop a curious passenger from pulling the handle in cruise? Obviously this type of door is not a plug type like in the older aircraft. Pressure differential would stop anyone from removing it when they shouldn't. Even with only about 2psi differential pressure, there would be about 1000 pound of force holding that door in! From memory I think the door on the -800 has a mechanical lock which is engaged by the aircraft air-ground logic, or something similar. Don't quote me on that, I'll have to check the AMM!

Once you have the door is open, you've gotta get off the aircraft! Sliding down the trailing edge flaps sounds easy enough, but it is still quite a height off the ground! So it may be quite difficult for the elderly and children to get off the aircraft, but they have decided it's not quite high enough to carry an over-wing slide like some of the bigger aeroplanes!


User currently offlineMarkHKG From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (7 years 11 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 5121 times:

Quoting TheJoe (Reply 19):
The only question this new design poses is what is to stop a curious passenger from pulling the handle in cruise?

Actually, the NG overwing door has an in-flight lock that keeps the door secure in-flight...it is automatically disengaged once the plane lands again. (Numerous factors control the lock, like throttle position, etc.)



Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
User currently offlineTroubleshooter From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 423 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (7 years 11 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 5117 times:

See also this thread for the NG flight locks:
B737 NG Overwing Exit Lock (by MarkHKG Sep 17 2006 in Tech Ops)



This job sucks!!! I love this job!!!
User currently offlineTheJoe From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 61 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (7 years 11 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5075 times:

Quoting Troubleshooter (Reply 21):
See also this thread for the NG flight locks:
B737 NG Overwing Exit Lock (by MarkHKG Sep 17 2006 in Tech Ops)

Thanks for that! Some interesting reading... I couldn't remember exactly how the door lock logic worked, but it's all coming back to me now!


User currently offlineTroubleshooter From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 423 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (7 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5025 times:

Quoting TheJoe (Reply 22):
Thanks for that!

You´re welcome!



This job sucks!!! I love this job!!!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Weight Of B737 Emergency Exit...
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Water Coming Out The Emergency Exit? posted Wed Oct 25 2006 01:39:29 by Mohavewolfpup
Emergency Exit Slide Videos posted Mon Oct 2 2006 06:52:56 by UAL757
Weight Of A340's Centre Bogey? posted Mon Jul 31 2006 19:56:41 by Zvezda
Empty Weight Of 787-9 Vs A359. Whats Wrong! posted Tue Apr 4 2006 17:03:34 by AirA380
Weight Of A Jersey Barrier posted Mon Feb 27 2006 22:52:59 by Cancidas
Weight Of Paint? posted Thu Jul 14 2005 12:11:40 by Thaigold
Flt&Gnd Modus On The Pressurisation Panel Of B737 posted Mon Oct 18 2004 12:23:24 by PilotIce
Average Weight Of A Pax posted Sat Apr 24 2004 11:11:28 by A380900
Weight Of An Engine? posted Sat Jan 24 2004 08:43:40 by Kaitak
Emergency Exit Path Lighting posted Sat Sep 13 2003 07:58:15 by Bigphilnyc

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format