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Tying Down Light Aircraft  
User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3495 posts, RR: 4
Posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 10638 times:

I am trying to learn how to properly tie down a plane. Can anyone give me a site that shows a good lesson as to how to make the proper knot (in the rope) to hold a light aircraft?


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User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6343 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 10653 times:

I (and several others) might be able to offer advice...are you talking about using ropes or chains for the tying down?


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User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3495 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 10647 times:

The airplanes I will tie down will use rope already anchored on the ramp.


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User currently offlineMissedApproach From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 713 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 10622 times:

You may want to poke around the internet for some sailing websites, they're sure to have some excellent & useable knots. Here are some:
http://www.tollesburysc.co.uk/Knots/Knots_gallery.htm
http://www.sailingusa.info/sailing_knots.htm
Now, as for applying them to an aircraft...well, I can't be much help there I'm afraid.



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User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3146 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 10606 times:

A good hitch will do the trick. Make sure the rope is nice and tight before adding the knot.


DMI
User currently offlineJarheadK5 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 216 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 10603 times:

Jeppesen teaches the bowline knot in their A&P textbooks.

You might try this as well:
http://www.airventure.org/2006/planning/tying_down.html

[Edited 2006-09-29 06:05:09]


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User currently offlineMrChips From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 927 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 10567 times:

A set of heavy duty nylon cargo tiedown straps for pickup trucks can do a good job too, especially if they have a friction-based lock - just as strong as (or stronger than) rope, takes 10 seconds per side and no need to learn knots.


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User currently offlineFutureUApilot From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1365 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 10541 times:

Learning to Tie down a plane isn't hard, but you really have to have someone show you. Head on down to your local FBO and have a line guy show you. Once you learn the knot, your all set!

-Sam



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User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 10505 times:

At BGSU, we kind of cheat. We have these nylon straps with hooks at either end, and a unique tightening device. All I have to do is attach one hook to the airplane, and the other, to the ground, and push a button on the device and pull until I get the tightness I want. If I decide to fly the airplane later, then I push a button on the device and push the extra slack into it, and then remove the hooks.

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 10502 times:
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Many people get the knots right, but leave the airplane in an unsafe position. Here's what I mean:


This airplane is positioned improperly. Without chocks, it would roll backward 6 or so feet and the tiedowns would all become loose. This would allow the airplane to move around in high winds.




--------------------------------------------------


This airplane is positioned properly. Because it is positioned behind the wing tie-downs, it is properly anchored in both directions. Even if this airplane wasn't chocked, it wouldn't roll forward or backward, because the wing and tail tie-downs are opposing each other.






2H4





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User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 10492 times:

Hi JAGflyer, Buzz here. I saw a recent magazine article AOPA Flight Training and there was a section on tie-downs and knots. You might find it on line.

A paragraph in the 1947 Aeronca Champ manual cautions pilots to tie down the aircraft anytime you leave it... empty weight is about 800 lbs or less, so these are pretty much Classic Ultralights. I keep my distance from helicopters.

g'day


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6343 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 10475 times:

Just to add additional info to what everyone is saying here (and I used to be a lineboy  Wink ), the objective of tying down an aircraft is 1) make sure the plane stays on the ground during a gust of wind 2) make sure the plane can't be moved by the wind and 3) make sure the rope/chain slack is secured in such a way that it can't get blown into the aircraft itself on a gusty day (#3 is the one I call line personnel on all the time when I take a rented 172 cross-country...).

If there is a lot of slack rope/chain left over after tying the aircraft down, tie the rope/chain off using a single knot spaced every 18 inches or so (half a meter for you metric dudes  Wink ). Most chain tiedown setups have an extra hook in the chain for tying off the slack or adjusting a high-wing tiedown for a low-winged aircarft, but I've encountered ones that don't.

Also, if you make the rope so tight that it is pulling the aircraft, back off-the aircraft owner won't be too happy when they come back out to the plane.

Remember, treat every plane like it's your baby. You will be rewarded with complements by aircraft owners, and word spreads fast about poor line service (check out airnav.com and the FBO comments at your favorite airport!).



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6343 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 10469 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 9):
2H4

Boy, the pilot of PH-JNP needs to do a better pre-flight, the reason he isn't moving is that he left the tiedowns on  Wink Big grin



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User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 10421 times:

One trick I used to use back in the day when I was flying general aviation a lot... tie the two wings down first, then using the tail tiedown rope, pull the airplane back to snug up the wings nicely before tying the tail down. Makes the airplane very snugly tied down compared with just tying 3 knots.

User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 10 months 1 day ago) and read 10396 times:

Those walmart nylon straps are the cheaters...I usually always manage to pinch my hand in them. Gimme a good set of nylon ropes and you're good to go.

At some military fields I've gone into with the T-34, all there is he standard chains to tie it down..fun trying to put them through the GA-standard eyelets without totall destroying the paint.

DeltaGuy


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 15, posted (7 years 10 months 22 hours ago) and read 10373 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR



Also, if you want to go the extra mile, remember the nose tie-down on many Cessnas:





2H4





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User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3495 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (7 years 10 months 21 hours ago) and read 10370 times:

One of the more experienced rampers showed me how to do the tie down. A few people have shown me but I didn't get it really until today. We make one knot, "lock it" by doing another knot, repeat that knot a bit lower and then do another basic knot (just a quick figure eight as back up). I'll figure it out after I do it a few times. All the rampers do it the same way. Only the students/pilots do it different. :p I still prefer chocks. We die down each wing and the tail. No tie down at the olio.

I am doing my high school co-op at an airport as a line guy. So I gotta know how to tie down a plane

[Edited 2006-09-30 05:00:38]


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User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 17, posted (7 years 10 months 21 hours ago) and read 10361 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR




Quoting JAGflyer (Reply 16):
I am doing my high school co-op at an airport as a line guy.

Congrats on the co-op...you'll love it! Although you'll certainly experience your share of sub-zero kerosene-soaked windchill misery, you'll learn a ton and will be glad you jumped on the opportunity.

Keep a camera handy and have fun!  Smile



2H4





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User currently offlineFlyMatt2Bermud From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 18, posted (7 years 10 months 16 hours ago) and read 10334 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 15):
Also, if you want to go the extra mile, remember the nose tie-down on many Cessnas:

I had forgotten all about that nose tie-down! Thanks 2H4! Also, I think you should patent the bright (remove before flight) red tie down ropes in your photo examples!!



"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward" Leonardo Da Vinci
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 19, posted (7 years 10 months 11 hours ago) and read 10315 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR




Quoting FlyMatt2Bermud (Reply 18):
I think you should patent the bright (remove before flight) red tie down ropes in your photo examples!!

You know, come to think of it, I've only ever seen non-white tiedown ropes once. They were bright yellow. Because they were made from a hard plastic-like material (and not fabric), knots wouldn't hold at all. You may be on to something, though....it seems logical to make tiedown ropes a bright color.



2H4





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