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Tri-motor - What's That On The Wing?  
User currently offlineTimePilot From Switzerland, joined Sep 2005, 296 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6534 times:

In this photo here: http://www.aviaprints.com/images/birds/AP001-S-Ford-Tri-Motor-413.jpg (Sorry, I don't have my own photo.)

What is that small tube-like thing sticking out and down of the left wing? (far right side of the photo.) Is that for measuring air speed?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6118 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6525 times:

If I remember correctly from reading various things on sailplanes, it's there to provide a more rapid response from the pitot-static system on the static side, i.e.; the VSI will respond much faster here than in a standard pitot-static setup, which, for a sailplane, will allow the pilot to guage whether or not he is in an area of lift more accurately. I'm not sure what it's called, though.


Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6525 times:

Appears to be the pitot tube, indeed it does measure airspeed. As the Ford Trimotor hurtles through the air at speeds unmatched by anything but maybe a 1951 Studebaker pulling a horse trailer over the Grapevine, air is rammed into the open forward end of that tube and the resultant pressure reads as airspeed.

Search online for "pitot tube" images for schematics and so forth.

The Ford Trimotor holds a distinction. A flight from San Francisco to Reno back in the 20s flew at cruise speed into the top of a hill down near Auburn California - without any serious injuries.

Well, there might have been some, you know, spilled coffee etc.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineKPIE172 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 20 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6525 times:

Could it be a fuel overflow port? Seeing as it angled downward it looks like it wouldn't provide accurate direct air pressure for airspeed. Although it seems like it would be a good place for the pitot tube (out of the way of the prop wash).

Not sure though, I'm sure someone knows the right answer!

PS. Good to be here after 3-4 years of browsing  Smile



Blue side up!
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6525 times:

Quoting TimePilot (Thread starter):
What is that small tube-like thing sticking out and down of the left wing? (far right side of the photo.) Is that for measuring air speed?

Sure looks like a Pitot Tube to me... The Pitot Tube is indeed where the airspeed indicator reading comes from (the "Ram" pressure component at least!). I'm no tri-motor expert, however.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17172 posts, RR: 66
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6507 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 2):

The Ford Trimotor holds a distinction. A flight from San Francisco to Reno back in the 20s flew at cruise speed into the top of a hill down near Auburn California - without any serious injuries.

Well, there might have been some, you know, spilled coffee etc.

Oh the humanity! Big grin



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 6118 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6501 times:

Found it. It's called a "total energy probe," which is a variation of a pitot tube.

Picture of a variant here:

http://www.whiteplanes.com/images/showcase/toyota/toyota7.jpg



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 6457 times:

A close up:



Its a pitot tube for sure, but don't know why you'd want a total energy probe in a trimotor....

Maybe the bottom thingy is a static port?


User currently offlineATCT From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 2345 posts, RR: 38
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6441 times:

Looks like a Static Port/Pitot Tube combo. (I believe Piper Warrior's have a similar device...but square...been a while since ive flown one).


ATCT



"The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing." - Walt Disney
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2577 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6426 times:

Quoting KPIE172 (Reply 3):
Seeing as it angled downward it looks like it wouldn't provide accurate direct air pressure for airspeed.

It's angled down so that it is better aligned with local airflow. Placing it well forward of the leading edge will also provide more accurate readings. Ford clearly wanted it to read as many knots as it possible.  Smile



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 6310 times:

Hi Jetlagged, Buzz here. Well, if they wanted higher numbers then Henry Ford (or was it Mr. Edsel?) should calibrate the Airspeed in MPH instead of Knots. Back in the 1920's not many people over here uses kilometers per hour, but that would have given a significant boost in speed (grin)

Several 1930's airplanes had that 2 stage pitot probe. I haven't taken one apart so far. I guess it's out of the "local flow" from the props and nacelles up there.

g'day


User currently offlineTimePilot From Switzerland, joined Sep 2005, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 6087 times:

Thanks for everyone's answers  Smile

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