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Thrust Levers Out Of Sync In Picture?  
User currently offlineJawed From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 482 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4707 times:

In this cockpit photo:

http://www.airliners.net/open.file?id=0943177

the two thrust levers for the engines are slightly offset, with the left one being pushed forward more. does that mean that the left engine was giving more thrust during this flight? why would that happen?

[Edited 2006-11-18 06:28:01]

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4695 times:

No it means that the thrust lever calibrations do not match each other. Quite common.


09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 25
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4675 times:

Quoting Ralgha (Reply 1):
No it means that the thrust lever calibrations do not match each other. Quite common.

Throttle Stagger shouldn't occour on the B767 because it has FADEC...



Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
User currently offlineTroubleshooter From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 423 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4672 times:

Quoting Jawed (Thread starter):
does that mean that the left engine was giving more thrust during this flight?

If you have a closer look to that picture you will see a N1 indication of 93,5% per engine so the thrust should be equal.



This job sucks!!! I love this job!!!
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5518 posts, RR: 14
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4661 times:

Quoting Kaddyuk (Reply 2):
Throttle Stagger shouldn't occour on the B767 because it has FADEC

I've worked on plenty of B767 that were not FADEC. I don't know if this one is or not. But EICAS shows the same thrust being produced (N1).



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2395 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4642 times:

Quoting Kaddyuk (Reply 2):
Throttle Stagger shouldn't occour on the B767 because it has FADEC...

Only one of our 20+ 767s has FADEC! That split is nothing compared to the good old JT9Ds on the 762s.


User currently offlineErj-145mech From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 306 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4607 times:

Less than 1/2 knob difference= in tolerance.

User currently offlineMD11Fanatic From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 81 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 4554 times:

What about the altimeters? The primary and backup altimeters have the same barometer setting but they're separated by 300 ft. What gives?

User currently offlineBoeingFixer From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 534 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 4547 times:

Quoting MD11Fanatic (Reply 7):
What about the altimeters? The primary and backup altimeters have the same barometer setting but they're separated by 300 ft. What gives?

That's common for the Pneumatic Standby Altimeter. It's called Hysteresis and is a mechanical phenomenon where the elastic properties of the bellows and mechanisms inside the altimeter produce errors. This happens after a fast ascent or descent and can also happen after a prolonged period in cruise at altitude.

Cheers,

John



Cheers, John YYC
User currently offline113312 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 574 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 4543 times:

Looking closely at the engine indications, the two engines are operating at nearly identical settings. The thrust lever stagger is typical.

The standby barometric altimeter is 300 feet higher than the captains indicator. However, this is also common. The Captain and First Officer altimeters are driven from their respective Air Data Computers and are highly accurrate. This degree of difference is common at that altitude.


User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2565 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 4538 times:

Quoting 113312 (Reply 9):
The standby barometric altimeter is 300 feet higher than the captains indicator. However, this is also common. The Captain and First Officer altimeters are driven from their respective Air Data Computers and are highly accurrate. This degree of difference is common at that altitude.

The ADC increases accuracy by applying correction for static port position errors. The standby altimeter has no position error correction.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1987 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4496 times:

I remember back in the good old days, i was flying in an AC 742 YYZ-YVR and i went into the cockpit and not one of the trust leavers matched, it was interesting to see for sure, another interesting thing about that flight is it was the first time i landed on 30 in YVR in a widebody come to think of it i dont even remember another time where i have seen a widebody land on 30 or 12... o well.


Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineAvt007 From Canada, joined Jul 2000, 2132 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4485 times:

I came back from YYZ the other day, and much to my surprise we landed on rwy12, in a 767. It was a very windy day, however.

User currently offlineZvocio79 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4483 times:

different part number............just kidding.........perhaps the triming.........look on eicas, the thrust ratin seems ot be the same for both.

User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4481 times:

Rigging power and speed set levers was pretty common practice on Garretts and PT6s. ....half a knob mismatch was considered pretty decent rigging.

The important thing was to get the decay rate the same on both engines. See, slapping the power levers back on the stops would set up a 700 fpm descent. If the engines did not spool down at the same rate this could cause a lot of heartache, particularly if it was something close coupled with a rapid roll rate like a MU2. That killed more than one pilot.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31692 posts, RR: 56
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 4401 times:

Quoting Zvocio79 (Reply 13):
different part number............just kidding.........perhaps the triming.........look on eicas, the thrust ratin seems ot be the same for both

The EEC would help preventing overboost.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
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