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737 Shutting Down Engine Before Stopping  
User currently offlineCoolpilot From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 21 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3747 times:

I noticed on my last trip on a 737-700, as we turned to pull into the gate at KBWI the right side engine was shut down completely and the left one was left on until we were parked and the seat belt light was turned off. Is this normal?

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Yes.


09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3733 times:

No need to taxi on two engines, might as well shut one down on taxi-in. Gets the shutdown checklist started sooner.

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3702 posts, RR: 34
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3724 times:
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Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 2):
No need to taxi on two engines, might as well shut one down on taxi-in. Gets the shutdown checklist started sooner.

It is more a case of fuel conservation


User currently offlineJamesbuk From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 3968 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3707 times:

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 2):
down on taxi-in.

He said when they turned into the gate area, so when they turn and start lining up to jetway and this would be so that the trucks that load and unload the plane from the right side can get roughly into postion while the crew go through the engine shut down check.

rgds --James--



You cant have your cake and eat it... What the hells the point in having it then!!!
User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3704 times:

Quoting VC-10 (Reply 3):
It is more a case of fuel conservation

Especially in today's airline business...it is more economical to taxi on one engine to save fuel.


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3692 times:

Quoting Coolpilot (Thread starter):
Is this normal?

Yes, and it's for fuel conservation and to allow the #2 engine to spin down earlier so that when the aircraft blocks in the ramp folks can get right to work.

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 2):
Gets the shutdown checklist started sooner.

I don't have a checklist in front of me, but wouldn't this occur only after both engines had been shut down?


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3669 times:

Not only its for conservation of fuel, its for safety purpose, the cargo pit doors are on the right side of the fuselage. Its so that the rampers dont get sucked in, even though there is still pressure coming into the engine inlet. Thats based upon the SOP at AS.


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineCoolpilot From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3634 times:

Ah, that would make sense safety wise since the SWA groundcrews move in as soon as the plane is in position. I guess they wait until the final turn because I would imagine that it would be difficult to steer with only one engine. I know 747s do it all the time with 4 engines, but is it hard to control a 2-engine aircraft with only 1 engine?

User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4211 posts, RR: 37
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3604 times:

It's not difficult to steer with only one engine. I taxi out and in single engine the majority of the time in the CRJ. A hard right turn-out from a hardstand is the only really hard thing to do while respecting ground thrust limitations if you're single engine.


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineBarney Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 970 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3598 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 6):
I don't have a checklist in front of me, but wouldn't this occur only after both engines had been shut down?

Correctamundo.

The procedure goes something like this:

As long as the braking action is at least good -#2 engine cut-off.

Once stopped, set parking brake, seat belt sign off.

Chocks are put in place, ground power connected, #1 engine cutoff.

Brakes released, parking checklist read/completed.

Burrito/Starbucks run commenced.



...from the Banana Republic....
User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3595 times:

Alot of airlines will shut #2 down after crossing an active runway to save the precious $$$ of burning fuel needlessly!


Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineNonfirm From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 434 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3586 times:

It helps preserve the life of the rampers and save the company money on fuel.  airplane 

User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3500 times:

Quoting Aogdesk (Reply 2):
Gets the shutdown checklist started sooner

Damn, forgot my little tongue in cheek smiley. For those thinking i was serious about the checklist, I wasn't. Fuel fuel fuel.


User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1654 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3492 times:

Such an operation was very common on piston propliners. It not only saves fuel but it saves on engine time, as well.

Suppose that you shut down the #1 and #4 and it takes 10 minutes to taxi in on the remaining two engines. In a six-stop day, that saves two hours of engine operation.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 15, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 3423 times:

It can save some Expensive ATF & also helps having the RH side Engine shutdown faster so Service crews can commence work faster.
Out here there have been occasions when the Inbd Engine to a turn Ahead has been shutdown a minute or two prior to Taxiing into the Bay.

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineHighFlyer9790 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3118 times:

Same thing happens sometimes to my knowledge while taxiing to the active for takeoff-if its rush hour and you are #15 for takeoff, its much better to only burn the fuel needed for one engine.


121
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4022 posts, RR: 33
Reply 17, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3084 times:

Quoting Barney Captain (Reply 10):
Chocks are put in place, ground power connected, #1 engine cutoff

But make sure that the ground handling rules dont say that the rampers must not approach an aircraft with the beacon on!


User currently offlineBarney Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 970 posts, RR: 13
Reply 18, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3063 times:

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 17):
Quoting Barney Captain (Reply 10):
Chocks are put in place, ground power connected, #1 engine cutoff

But make sure that the ground handling rules dont say that the rampers must not approach an aircraft with the beacon on!

I'm not 100% sure what you're referring to, but our procedure allows for the ground crews to approach the a/c while the #1 engine is running (or both for that matter) for the purposes of hooking up the ground power.



...from the Banana Republic....
User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 19, posted (7 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 3047 times:

Quoting HighFlyer9790 (Reply 16):
Same thing happens sometimes to my knowledge while taxiing to the active for takeoff-if its rush hour and you are #15 for takeoff, its much better to only burn the fuel needed for one engine.

And hope you don't get the call to wander past all others as you're number next, position and hold! Whoops.......now what, minute to start, 2 to heat!  embarrassed 



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineTWAL1011727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 631 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2787 times:

To take this further...some airlines leave the APU off til external power is hooked up...saves on APU cycles too.

With the majority of airlines they have a 1 minute cool down before they are allowed to shutoff an engine.
Generally stated (in TWA flt manual)any ops below 80% N2 is included in the cool time.
Most will delay shutdown til they cross multi runways and get on the ramp.

KD


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29802 posts, RR: 58
Reply 21, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2754 times:

Quoting Coolpilot (Thread starter):
Is this normal?

It is for noise abatemnet.

A ramp rat going through the compressor section makes one hell of a racket.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4022 posts, RR: 33
Reply 22, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2753 times:

Quoting Barney Captain (Reply 18):
but our procedure allows for the ground crews to approach the a/c while the #1 engine is running (or both for that matter) for the purposes of hooking up the ground power.

But I hope they must wait until the aircraft is stopped first. There have been two rampers run over by aircraft this autumn!
How does the ramp worker know that the aircraft has stopped before he approaches it to hook up ground power? What all aircraft need is a parking brake light on the noseleg facing fwd (like B757/767/777 A320) so everyone can see that the brakes are on before approaching the aircraft. There are too many incidents on the ramp with parking aircraft with engines running. Everyone is in a hurry to start work. We recently had a ramp worker walk out to Nbr1 engine on an A319 to place the cone in front of it. The cone was sucked up into the running engine!
I personally believe in no one approaching the aircraft until the engines are off and the beacons are off. But how do you cope with the case where the APU does not start on arrival?


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 23, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 2684 times:

Quoting TWAL1011727 (Reply 20):
Most will delay shutdown til they cross multi runways and get on the ramp.

Still that would take min Two minutes which is Adequate cooling time at Idle.

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 22):
We recently had a ramp worker walk out to Nbr1 engine on an A319 to place the cone in front of it. The cone was sucked up into the running engine

Is there any training provided.I'm surprised.

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 22):
I personally believe in no one approaching the aircraft until the engines are off and the beacons are off. But how do you cope with the case where the APU does not start on arrival?

Out here chocks are placed only after Parking brakes are set & Engines are shutdown.If tha APU is u/s in day ops is not a problem.Its only during nights when the GPU would need to be connected prior to Engine shutdown,but thats a rarity.
On Freighters even thats not an issue.If its dark for a few minutes its ok.Safety comes first.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineN243NW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1637 posts, RR: 20
Reply 24, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 2676 times:

Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 22):
We recently had a ramp worker walk out to Nbr1 engine on an A319 to place the cone in front of it. The cone was sucked up into the running engine!

From the looks of it, the ramp worker was fortunate not to get sucked in himself!

-N243NW Big grin



B-52s don't take off. They scare the ground away.
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