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VC-10 Hydraulic's And Control-Surfaces  
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 9 months 1 hour ago) and read 5299 times:

The VC-10 had a rather interesting hydraulic layout if I recall... anyone know more?

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 9 months 1 hour ago) and read 5297 times:

This may be of interest to you:

http://www.vc10.net/Technical/hydraulics.html


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 9 months 1 hour ago) and read 5290 times:

Thank you. Was the electrically-driven hydraulic pack system successful?

Andrea


User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 9 months ago) and read 5274 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 2):
Was the electrically-driven hydraulic pack system successful?

I am not sure. I will try to find out though.


User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5235 times:

Actually they worked quite well.They weren't something that was changed that often.

If I remember correctly, the main issues we had was with the autopilot servo motors that were connected to the PFCUs.


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 4001 posts, RR: 34
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 5223 times:

I do remember pushing the steps around the aircraft to check the hyd quantitys on a weekly check.
There was no EICAS to look at!, you had to go and look at every little tank and check the level.


User currently offlineVC10 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 1408 posts, RR: 16
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5211 times:

The PFCU system was a very reliable system, after a few initial problems, and in the 10 years I was with the VC-10 I do not recall them being a problem. The biggest problem was if something went wrong with the elevator PFCU as they were so high from the ground, and I always remember the feeling of relief after working on one, using a cherry picker, on the ramp at LHR . It was good to get down in one piece, Prior to the introduction of the VC-10 BOAC had to build a special overhaul workshop for them where the air was finely filtered as the limits on the PFCU components was very tight.

littlevc10


User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3701 posts, RR: 34
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5211 times:
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Quoting Blackbird (Reply 2):
Was the electrically-driven hydraulic pack system successful?

Well, they are using it on the 380!


User currently offlineDH106 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 626 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5205 times:

Slightly off topic, for those with an eye for detail - the the VC10 has always struck me as unique in that it doesn't seem to have any secondary nose gear doors - meaning the small ones that remain open when gear is down and covers the area where the leg itself extends through. Take a look at any VC10 piccie with the gear down and you'll see what I mean.

Is there a small 'hatch' that closes from the inside when the gear is raised to streamline the hole in the fuz through which the nose gear passes when down?



...I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate....
User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3701 posts, RR: 34
Reply 9, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5196 times:
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Quoting DH106 (Reply 8):
Is there a small 'hatch' that closes from the inside when the gear is raised to streamline the hole in the fuz through which the nose gear passes when down?

Yes, the strut door folds in two & goes up into the bay aft of the strut


User currently offlineDH106 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 626 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5186 times:

Quoting VC-10 (Reply 9):
Yes, the strut door folds in two & goes up into the bay aft of the strut

Ahhhh - thanks. Neat arrangement.
Love the VC-10 - a very asthetic aircraft. Excellent safety record as well.



...I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate....
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 11, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 5183 times:

Quoting VC-10 (Reply 7):
Quoting Blackbird (Reply 2):
Was the electrically-driven hydraulic pack system successful?

Well, they are using it on the 380!

Ok, but is that a yes or a no?  angel 


User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3701 posts, RR: 34
Reply 12, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5163 times:
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Quoting Blackbird (Reply 2):
Was the electrically-driven hydraulic pack system successful?

I've just remembered that it was used on the Vickers Valiant before the VC-10

And the Nose Gear Door

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.robinson16/Door.jpg

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.robinson16/Door2.jpg

Taken from 1962 vintage course notes


User currently offlineDH106 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 626 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5153 times:

Quoting VC-10 (Reply 12):
And the Nose Gear Door

Makes perfect sense now VC10 - thanks  Smile
I did manage a quick look at G-ARVM's nose gear before she was unfortunately cut up and did see a bit of the blue painted door face behind the leg!
Seems fairly simple and doesn't need a lot of space - wonder why no other airliners used a system like that.



...I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate....
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 5120 times:

I think that hydraulic pack system sounds a hell of a lot better than the systems we used on our jets.

User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks ago) and read 4954 times:

I don't know why this didn't occur to me back then: I thought electrical systems have a higher incidence of failure than hydraulic systems?

Andrea K


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 4784 times:

Did those electrical hydraulic packs have mechanical linkages like an ordinary hydraulic powered plane, or was it fly-by-wire?

Andrea K


User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 4770 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 16):
Did those electrical hydraulic packs have mechanical linkages like an ordinary hydraulic powered plane, or was it fly-by-wire?

They are both. Mechanical for normal use and electrical for autopilot.


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4647 times:

How did it achieve such reliability using an electrically powered hydraulic system. From what I remember, electrical systems have a far higher incidence of failures. What made it reliable enough if applicable, even if it was just dumb luck. :p

Thank you for your reply, Saintsman


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