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Boeing Video On Open DV Window At Takeoff  
User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 6696 times:

Apologies if this has been posted before.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_87KqdX7PE

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFlyfisher1976 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 804 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 6671 times:

The 777 footage is very cool. i wonder what the altitude was when he opened it?

User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6596 times:

He isn't kidding about the noise. I flew a DC-9 about sixty miles with the window open. I was at cruise at 250 knots at about 6000' on a short ferry flight, flying with a training captain who was getting me ready for upgrade. I could look straight ahead out the CV window and not feel any breeze at all. The Jepp plate clipped to my yoke hardly fluttered. But the noise was astonishing! About the same, in my memory as standing behind Niagara Falls.


Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 6568 times:

Has that ever happened during cruise at the flight levels and typical cruising speeds?

I'd presume the pressure differential would make that pretty much impossible, but I could be wrong.


User currently offlineMender From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6539 times:

Why on earth does Boeing feel they need to put a "window Not Closed" decal on the window frame?

Is it actually possible for the window to be open enough to read this decal and the pilot not know the window is open?


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8942 posts, RR: 40
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6534 times:

I'm sure putting your head out the window would not be a good idea either. . . LOL!

Great video, thanks.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineJamesbuk From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 3968 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6531 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 4):

Try listening to the vid, the guy says, "This sticker is so that when you are winding in the window, you look out of the side, if the sticker is still visible then the window is not sealed properly"

Great video!!

rgds --James--



You cant have your cake and eat it... What the hells the point in having it then!!!
User currently offlineBAe146QT From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2006, 996 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 6523 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 4):
Why on earth does Boeing feel they need to put a "window Not Closed" decal on the window frame?

You live in the UK and you have to ask? I presume you don't watch television and don't see the "No-win, no-fee adverts" - we sue as much as the Americans now.

Don't get me wrong Mender - I'm on your side. But if someone can screw up and blame it on someone worth suing, they will.

Quoting 777236ER (Thread starter):
Apologies if this has been posted before.

Thank you T7 - it was very interesting. I had no idea how this worked on different aircraft. Fascinating how it has evolved from brute force in the 737 to a geared winder in the 7N7 birds.

Kinda makes you want to ask, "Why didn't you lot think of this before?"



Todos mis dominós son totalmente pegajosos
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 6469 times:

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 7):
Fascinating how it has evolved from brute force in the 737 to a geared winder in the 7N7 birds.

True, but aren't those later windows also much larger?



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 6459 times:

Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 3):
pressure differential would make that pretty much impossible

Right, notice the narrator specified "unpressurized" flight. Let's say the sliding window is 24" by 30" and you are pressurized to 8.6 PSID. That would put 6192 pounds of pressure against the window. Try lifting that with a four inch lever and one hand. Even with only a quarter pound of differential it would be 180 pounds.

Am I mistaken or does the NG have a bit more clearance between the window handle and that protrusion above it. I'd swear I've jammed a finger in that space a time or two.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineMender From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 6440 times:

Quoting Jamesbuk (Reply 6):
Try listening to the vid, the guy says, "This sticker is so that when you are winding in the window, you look out of the side, if the sticker is still visible then the window is not sealed properly"

With the aircraft on the ground and the window unlatched gravity will open the window. I cannot see that the window will remain in the forward position but unlatched at flying speed.

If the window was open far enough to see this sticker then I would notice there was a whacking great hole in the side of the cockpit. I wouldn't need a sticker to tell me this, no matter how pre-occupied I was flying the thing. I can understand the latched/unlatched placard on the upper latch mechanism but not this open sticker.

Quoting BAe146QT (Reply 7):
You live in the UK and you have to ask? I presume you don't watch television and don't see the "No-win, no-fee adverts" - we sue as much as the Americans now.

Next you are going to tell me there is a placard on the 767 seat base that say the seat must face forward and be locked for take off and landing (or words to that effect). If someone is going to try to fly an aeroplane with the seat facing the wrong way then I don't want to use the toilet after him/her.

Don't get me wrong. I am not having a go at pilots. I'm having a pop at Boeing and their lawyers. What an insult to everyone’s intelligence.


User currently offlineJamesbuk From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 3968 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 6417 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 10):

But if you only see a little bit of the sticker, then your going to have presurisation problems. He said it in the video its there so you can make sure its fully locked, the window latch at the top works on the same principle as a public toilet door occupied sign, if the bolts closed itll say closed. (or so im told)

Rgds --James--



You cant have your cake and eat it... What the hells the point in having it then!!!
User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 6226 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 10):
Next you are going to tell me there is a placard on the 767 seat base that say the seat must face forward and be locked for take off and landing (or words to that effect).

I don't know about the 767 but there is just that on the DC-10. The one good thing about lawyers is that they have helped the sticker industry immensely.  Smile


User currently offlineSanjet From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 180 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6129 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 10):
Next you are going to tell me there is a placard on the 767 seat base that say the seat must face forward and be locked for take off and landing (or words to that effect

Actually a lot of aircraft do have a placard stating that seat must be locked during take off and landing.



Will Fly For Food!
User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 962 posts, RR: 51
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 6093 times:

Quoting Mender (Reply 10):
With the aircraft on the ground and the window unlatched gravity will open the window.

No, it won't.

The force of gravity is perpendicular to the track along which the cockpit windows can open. In the example of the 737-900, it was a parallel force (that of building aerodynamic resistance) that pushed the unlatched window open. Gravity had nothing to do with that (or any other) window opening.

Quoting Mender (Reply 10):
If the window was open far enough to see this sticker then I would notice there was a whacking great hole in the side of the cockpit.

Don't get me wrong. I am not having a go at pilots. I'm having a pop at Boeing and their lawyers. What an insult to everyone’s intelligence.

And you would think that, wouldn't you? But it's there nevertheless.

There are also no smoking signs around fuel depots. There are "slippery when wet" signs in bathrooms. There are high voltage signs on substations and long distance transmission lines. There's a frickin warning lable on coffee that the beverage is hot.

We don't need you to telling us the obvious anymore than we need Boeing telling us the window is open.  eyebrow 


User currently offlineThrottleHold From South Africa, joined Jul 2006, 655 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 5902 times:

Quoting DfwRevolution (Reply 14):
No, it won't.

The force of gravity is perpendicular to the track along which the cockpit windows can open

Yes it can.
The window track is not quite horizontal, but sloped slightly downwards and aft.
I once had the cockpit wondow slide open on landing at about 60kts, all by itself.


User currently offlineTod From Denmark, joined Aug 2004, 1724 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 5883 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 12):
The one good thing about lawyers is that they have helped the sticker industry immensely.

The lawyers should not get all the credit. There are FAA Interior Compliance DER's out there that have definately done their share.

Tod


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5882 times:

Quoting DfwRevolution (Reply 14):
There are also no smoking signs around fuel depots. There are "slippery when wet" signs in bathrooms. There are high voltage signs on substations and long distance transmission lines. There's a frickin warning lable on coffee that the beverage is hot.

We have scooters in the office (yes, small IT company). My colleague just bought a new one and it has a HUGE sticker about wearing a helmet, not riding in a half-pipe, not jumping...



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineSudden From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5882 times:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Reply 12):
The one good thing about lawyers is that they have helped the sticker industry immensely

Soon we will have stickers outside the frame, telling pilots "cockpit this way" followed by an arrow.  Wink

Aim for the sky!
Sudden



When in doubt, flat out!
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5879 times:

Quoting Sudden (Reply 18):
Aim for the sky!

Whoa whoa! You need a disclaimer on that statement. Something like "This statement is in no way an encouragement or a suggestion to aim at anything. Do not aim at people or objects. Use the safety."



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineSudden From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5863 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 19):
Whoa whoa! You need a disclaimer on that statement

I get a sticker for it.  Wink

Aim for the sky!
Sudden



When in doubt, flat out!
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 21, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 5857 times:

Quoting Sudden (Reply 18):
Soon we will have stickers outside the frame, telling pilots "cockpit this way" followed by an arrow.

Hell, last time I went skiing I saw some guy wearing a sweater that had "HEAD" and an up-arrow "۸" design embroidered on it. Honestly, who needs that kind of help getting a shirt on?

Quoting ThrottleHold (Reply 15):
The window track is not quite horizontal, but sloped slightly downwards and aft.
I once had the cockpit wondow slide open on landing at about 60kts, all by itself.

Picking as little nit as possible I'd suggest that if you were accelerating through 60 knots that acceleration, partially unweighting the window from the down-aft sloping track had at least as much to do with it sliding open as gravity had.

Kind of like releasing the brakes on a Twin Beech and having the transponder land at the last row of seats. (kind of embarassing when the passengers hand it back forward to you!)



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineThrottleHold From South Africa, joined Jul 2006, 655 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5844 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 21):
Picking as little nit as possible I'd suggest that if you were accelerating through 60 knots that acceleration,

Nope, I was decelerating through about 60 on the landing roll.


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 23, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5842 times:

Quoting ThrottleHold (Reply 22):
Nope, I was decelerating through about 60 on the landing roll.

Thereby demonstrating the value of "educated" guesses.
 Sad



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineThrottleHold From South Africa, joined Jul 2006, 655 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5838 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 23):
Thereby demonstrating the value of "educated" guesses

Entirely forgivable! A little knowledge is a dangerous thing!


User currently offlineMender From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 25, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 5800 times:

At the risk of adding more fuel to the fire I'd like to say I'm enjoying this thread. Quite a lively debate going on for a change.

By the way 10 points to ThrottleHold

Quoting ThrottleHold (Reply 15):
Yes it can.
The window track is not quite horizontal, but sloped slightly downwards and aft.

I know the 757, and the 767 tracks are not horizontal. Same goes for the 737 so I guess that applies to the 707 and the 727 by default. Unlatch the windows and they usually fully open by themselves.

Quoting DfwRevolution (Reply 14):
There's a frickin warning lable on coffee that the beverage is hot.

This is exactly what your adverage Maccy D's customer needs. I know, I've seen enough of them wobbling about ;0)


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