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Tips For An Aspiring Mechanic  
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4198 times:

Hi there, folks. Nik here again.

I understand many of you boys (and hopefully girls) are mechanics and/or aircraft technicians.

I need some advice: I cannot become a commercial pilot because of my eyesight, so I am thinking of becoming a mechanic.

What should I do in preparation for this career? What should be the best course of action? What airlines/companies should I look at for starting positions?

Thanks,
Nik


I need a drink.
90 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCdfMxTech From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1338 posts, RR: 27
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4179 times:

You're probably better requesting the assistance from someone who works in Canada (since thats where it says you hail from). You'll probably get a more accurate picture of what to expect. Things differ dramatically from country to country.

User currently offlineZvocio79 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4176 times:

How about becoming a teacher at a middle school somewhere.
You can only become a mechanic if it is your vocation, if it is in you.......if you do it as a second choice, you may not think that's what you want for living.
1st. love what you do.
2nd do what you love.

you'll understand one day when is like 3 degrees out there and you gotta change a fuel control unit or something on the ramp.


User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 4171 times:

Quoting Zvocio79 (Reply 2):

I understand what you're trying to say here, Zvocio. However, I feel that even if I'm changing a fuel pump at -25C here in Calgary or wherever in Canada, I am going to try and enjoy it, even at -25.

I have enjoyed planes ever since I was a young child. However, since I cannot fly them for a living, I have decided that fixing them would be just as good and satisfying.

I hope I did not uh, try and confuse you there sir, and if I did, numerous apologies.



I need a drink.
User currently offlineMohavewolfpup From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 4163 times:

I know a plane (especially a jet engine powered plane) is different then cars, but experience on cars is pretty good imho. teaches you spacial skills, problem solving (like how the f'#@!#! do I get the last spark plug on a ford 3.0 V6 on the passengers side near the a/c unit) and much more.

do you have any experience related to having a engine bolted in something?

oh yeah, while I think of it. try to figure out a way in this stupid post 9/11 zomg terrorism around every corner world to meet up with some plane mechanics. when I was canada it seemed a hell of alot nicer there, well when you got away from the retarded american TSA zones in the airport.

it may sound cool right now unbolting and bolting a new jet engine into a 737 or A380, but that's on the surface. are you prepared for tight schedules, demands, lack of tools/support, and alot more?

i've gone to repair something on a car, and had issues flare up like with a ford 4.0 V6 "oh this thermostat will be 20 minutes at the most" well, a day later..... the thermostat housing is held on by 3 bolts, the last bolt being on the bottom and a pain to reach (ended up hacksawing the end off a wrench to just make it specially fit, then bending it at a weird angle) only to have the bolt strip out. crappy aluminum block.

off comes the clutch fan, out comes the radiator, etc etc so the broken off bolt can be drilled/tapped out and then repaired :p

i'm sure a CFM series engine or a rolls royce or anything with a turbine or prop bolted in/to it has some hellish aspects to it. case in point:

Quote:
"Though the Wright R-3350 would later become a trustworthy workhorse in large piston-engined aircraft, early models were beset with dangerous reliability problems, many caused by demands that the B-29 be put in operation as soon as possible. It had an impressive power-to-weight ratio, but this came at a heavy cost to durability. Worse, the cowling Boeing designed for the engine was too close (out of a desire for improved aerodynamics), and the early cowl flaps caused problematic flutter and vibration when open in most of the flight envelope. The 18 radial cylinders, compactly arranged in front and rear rows, overheated because of insufficient flow of cooling air, which in turn caused exhaust valves to unseat.

These weaknesses combined to make an engine that would overheat regularly at combat weights, particularly during climbs after takeoff. Unseated valves released fuel-air mixtures during engine combustion that acted as a blowtorch against the valve stems. When these burned through the engines disintegrated and caught fire. A fire that was not immediately contained in the forward part of the engine by fire extinguishers became impossible to put out. An accessory housing manufactured of magnesium alloy in the back of the engine would often catch fire and produced heat so intense it burned through the firewall to the main wing spar in no more than 90 seconds, resulting in catastrophic failure of the wing.

This problem would not be fully cured until the aircraft was re-engined with the more powerful Pratt & Whitney R-4360 'Wasp Major' in the B-29D/B-50 program, which arrived too late for World War II. Interim measures included cuffs placed on propeller blades to divert a greater flow of cooling air into the intakes, which had baffles installed to direct a stream of air onto the exhaust valves. Oil flow to the valves was also increased, asbestos baffles installed around rubber push rod fittings to prevent oil loss, thorough pre-flight inspections made to detect unseated valves, and frequent replacement of the uppermost 5 cylinders (every 25 hours of engine time) and engines (75 hours).

Pilots, including the present-day pilots of the Commemorative Air Force’s Fifi, describe flight after takeoff as being an urgent struggle for airspeed; generally, flight after takeoff should consist of striving for altitude. Radial engines need that airflow to keep cool, and failure to get up to speed as soon as possible could result in an engine failure and risk of fire. One helpful technique was doing a rolling start, rather than a braked start, and checking the magnetoes while already in motion."

even though that is a very ancient example (radial engines in a B29) I bet some actual jet engine mechanics or even piston fired mechanics could chime in with some interesting similar stories.

think for a moment using the above as a example. you hire in at a company that has boeing B29's. can you see yourself in 6 months, 2 years, 5 years, 20 years, 30 years replacing 5 cylinders in the engines every 25 hours of flight time and whole new engines every 75 hours?

suppose it's a busy company, and those times are reached very quickly, and you are on a team to do that all week all the time. we aren't talking about say reaching those flight times in 3 months, it's measured in days, not months or years.

if after reading this, you are ready to pickup a tool chest and run to the nearest B29, stop. that's good, but not too many are around anymore  

if you think you would be "ugh, good heavens. i don't want to do that in -24 weather, in 20 degree weather" (trying to give it to you in canadian terms of measurement, even though I snickered when the radio dj I heard on a toronto station said it's 14 outside and I'm thinking it's damn warm for being 14 degrees (about 80 degrees over this side of the border) on high stress demand schedules, etc then it may not be the job for you.

I'm not a mechanic myself on airplanes, but I do imagine there is a turnaround time for alot of planes as they are money and saying "screw this, i'll figure out the oil leak in 2 weeks" isn't good enough when that can cost a airlines thousands a day,hour,minute, whatever.

i'm not trying to scare you, just give you some facts that might be true of the industry.

reach for the sky if it's your goal and you can picture yourself with dirty fingernails and soaked in jet fuel, hydraulic fluid, and whatever fun fluids are flowing around in thousands of aircraft as we speak flying over our heads!

[Edited 2007-01-05 11:12:21]

[Edited 2007-01-05 11:18:15]

User currently offlineMX757 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 628 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4154 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Thread starter):
What should I do in preparation for this career?

Are you prepared for working midnight shift and having the middle of the week off? And working holidays for the next few years?

Do you have a tool kit? If not you might want to start purchasing tools now.

Quoting WestJetForLife (Thread starter):
What should be the best course of action?

Find an aircraft technician/engineer school near you and enroll asap.

Quoting WestJetForLife (Thread starter):
What airlines/companies should I look at for starting positions?

Judging by your username I think maybe West Jet??? Smile

If West Jet won't hire you due to lack of experience there is a large aircraft overhaul facility at YXX called Cascade Aerospace. You use it as a stepping stone to get to bigger and better paying jobs.



Is it broke...? Yeah I'll fix it.
User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3078 posts, RR: 20
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 4136 times:

Go talk to the instructors at S.A.I.T. It is where I went. I no longer fix airplanes but I do not regret it.

At the same time i do not miss it. In Canada, expecially working for 7F in the Arctic it can be a brutal job. You may enjoy changing the fuel pump at -25 when you are new.

In Canada all airlines will hire people as long as you have gone to an approved Transport Canada School. Some, if you get in the door in another dept may accept the correspondence program. I do not agree with it though.

I will say this. Think carefully. I wanted to fly as well and when that was not possible i figured i may as well fix them. They are NOT the same and one is not a great replacement for the other. While i liked my job i was not passionate about it. You need to be pasionate about it if you are going to do it for a career.

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 4133 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Thread starter):
I cannot become a commercial pilot because of my eyesight, so I am thinking of becoming a mechanic.

If you Love the Field.
If you are ok working long hours in the open in Bad weather.
If you are ok to get calls anytime of the night.
If you are ok Studying till you retire.

Then its a field for you.
I can tell you the DGCA regulations if you need.Pls tell me,as you seem to be from Canada.it would differ.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineWrenchBender From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1779 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4123 times:

Nik,
In and around YYC there are a lot of aviation related companies. Outside of the airlines AC, WS, CMA etc there are companies like Field Aviation, Eagle Copters, Borek, all doing heavy maintenance activities. Springbank has several companies doing heavy maint and component work, also Helitrades at Airdrie does helicopter component work. There are lots of opportunities out there but you need the schooling. SAIT has a great program I work with 2 guys that went there. Contact me by email (thru my profile) if you want to meet or need more info.

WrenchBender



Silly Pilot, Tricks are for kids.......
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 4101 times:

Yes....and always have something important that you have not attended to in the hopper so that when the crew chief gets that far away, misty eyed look and asks you if you want to go to tank school you can say sorry boss, I'm getting married this weekend. This may mean you have to say that your mother died...but this is an excuse you can use only 2 or 3 times a year.


It also helps to grow a mustache so you don't have to get respirator qualified.


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12217 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 4067 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting Mohavewolfpup (Reply 4):
I know a plane (especially a jet engine powered plane) is different then cars, but experience on cars is pretty good imho. teaches you spacial skills, problem solving (like how the f'#@!#! do I get the last spark plug on a ford 3.0 V6 on the passengers side near the a/c unit) and much more.

Back when I was in A&P school, we were told that car mechanics made some of the worst plane mechanics at first. Lots of bad habits that they need to get rid of. Such as using adjustable wrenches and stuff.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 9):
This may mean you have to say that your mother died...but this is an excuse you can use only 2 or 3 times a year.

One of my college professors had a "max one dead grandmother per semester" rule.



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 4060 times:

Gentlemen, I appreciate your input in this situation.

I understand the points of becoming a mechanic (midnight and holiday shifts, having the middle of the week off, having to change an engine or fuel plug at -25 in a blizzard, etc), but what job doesn't have its challenges?

I rarely, if ever, look at the negative side of a career, and even if I do, I find a way to get around it.

Yes, I have been getting in touch with the instructors at SAIT, and I will most likely be going to SAIT for my AME certification (since I heard SAIT's program was the best in Alberta).

Anyways, I appreciate all of the above statements; they've given me something to look on.

Cheers,
Nik



I need a drink.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 12, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 4058 times:

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 10):
Quoting Mohavewolfpup (Reply 4):
I know a plane (especially a jet engine powered plane) is different then cars, but experience on cars is pretty good imho. teaches you spacial skills, problem solving (like how the f'#@!#! do I get the last spark plug on a ford 3.0 V6 on the passengers side near the a/c unit) and much more.

Back when I was in A&P school, we were told that car mechanics made some of the worst plane mechanics at first. Lots of bad habits that they need to get rid of. Such as using adjustable wrenches and stuff.

i think the main difference is a mentality think. Many car mechanics turned aircraft mechanics can't get it into their heads that a plane can not just get off the road if something breaks down. Don't mind adjyustable spanners if you know how to use them properly (many aircraft hydraulics mechanics I know have one in their pocket).
It is mostly a quality thing.

Also, are you willing to carry the full responsibility for everything you are doing? This literally means going to jail if you make a mistake and or having human lifes on you conscience.

Jan


User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 4055 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 12):
Also, are you willing to carry the full responsibility for everything you are doing? This literally means going to jail if you make a mistake and or having human lives on you conscience

I understand that is a major burden on mechanics, and therefore I have done my homework on this topic extensively.

I know (both through reading these forums and talking to an actual AME) about all of the aspects of becoming a mechanic, and even though I am still in high school, I am ready for them when the time comes.



I need a drink.
User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 4045 times:

Well, the industry has changed alot over the past 5 years. I walked away because the airline I worked for (17yrs) decided they wanted us to work for the money we were making back in 1992, and work rule, and benefit changes too.
It was hard having management telling us that an outsorce facility did better work than we did, but having to work on an airplane, that had just returned from an outsorce vender, for a week or so to get it ready for revenue service was really hard to take.....in other words they lied.

So plan on being poor, and all the bad things you have heard here associated with working on airplanes. The hours, and weather were not really a problem for me, because I loved airplanes, the satisfaction of knowing that I fixed the problem was the drug for me, yes there were others that could have fixed it, but it was the personal satisfaction knowing that I put "that" airplane up there this time, was what made the bad stuff insignifigant. When I realized that I neded a second job just to try and stay at my past income levels, and the fact that I won't cross a picket line, made the decision to walk away easy.

I miss airplanes, but not the stress that went with a hostile management team of "yes men", that had no respect of your knowledge, because they had no consept of what you knew.

So as you embark on this career, remember that many in your management team will try to force you to do as little as possible, then tell their bosses that they begged you not to do it that way when something goes wrong.



"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 4029 times:

Quoting Ex52tech (Reply 14):
I miss airplanes, but not the stress that went with a hostile management team of "yes men", that had no respect of your knowledge, because they had no consept of what you knew.

So as you embark on this career, remember that many in your management team will try to force you to do as little as possible, then tell their bosses that they begged you not to do it that way when something goes wrong.

Yessuh, you got a witness! Tell 'em preacher!

Any mechanic worth his salt has to know exactly when it is time to to down tools and tell the boss "I'm not doing that because I don't get paid to pencil whip bad stuff. I'm going home. Call me tomorrow and we can talk." If you puss out...just once...you'll never live it down.

A very wise man-a policeman-told me once: "Suck one c**k-just one little teensy weensy c**k just once, and to all the world you're a c**ksucker. Is that what you want to be?"

Remember that always. Let somebody else be that person.


User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3078 posts, RR: 20
Reply 16, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4020 times:

Also becoming an AME because you love airplanes is not good enough reason. It takes way more than that. That neatness wears off fast. You had better have had a past of mechanical work so you know. See thing is about airplanes, Jets that is, most of the job is just replacing parts. Ideally if you want to be the most challenged work on small aircraft, but then the money there is big time crap.

I can still change a wheel in my sleep on the B737 or go out with all the tools to do a B727 engine change and not have to climb down until the engine is on the ground, and I spent the last 3 years as a QA inspector and did not touch airplanes. It is very very repetative working in an airline environment.

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineMohavewolfpup From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4017 times:

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 10):
Back when I was in A&P school, we were told that car mechanics made some of the worst plane mechanics at first. Lots of bad habits that they need to get rid of. Such as using adjustable wrenches and stuff.

I never use those for every little thing on the car, it's retarded. there are alot of bolts on cars that are in aluminum heads or seized in cast iron blocks that require more control then a sloppy adjustable wrench provides. easier to round the bolt, break it off, damage other components when you lose a grip, etc.

break out a socket set or anything else but a adjustable wrench (crescent wrench) is always my rule. you get the job done quicker with a socket set then a stupid crescent wrench anyday.


User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4012 times:

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 16):

I understand where you're coming from, greasespot.

However, as I may have mentioned above, I don't look at the negative sides of jobs. I always think positive, even when the task at hand is grim.



I need a drink.
User currently offlineMohavewolfpup From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4011 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Reply 18):
I understand where you're coming from, greasespot.

However, as I may have mentioned above, I don't look at the negative sides of jobs. I always think positive, even when the task at hand is grim

that's a good ethic to have  Smile I think most of us here are just worried you have stars in your eyes, and the luster will be lost when you get dumped off in front of a DC10, 737, or 767 to fix the problem of the engines not turning over.

my brother was starry eyed about being a fireman, but it wore off quickly.

reach for the sky and may all your dreams come true!


User currently offlineWestJetForLife From Canada, joined Jun 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4008 times:

Quoting Mohavewolfpup (Reply 19):

Haha, yes. Don't worry, folks. I don't have "Stars in my eyes". After I get my first aviation job, the lustre will still be there.

As long as I don't get sucked into a turbine, crushed by gear bay doors or have a wing, tailplane or an engine fall on me, I'll be the happiest mechanic on the job.



I need a drink.
User currently offlineAogdesk From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 935 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4002 times:

Go for it. Go in with your eyes wide open, be willing to put up with some shit, and learn as much as you possibly can from anyone and anything. Even if turning wrenches doesn't turn your crank, you'll have a head full of knowledge and opportunities in the industry. With a little luck, you'll catch the eye of someone that appreciates your ambition and willingness to work, and who knows where it might go. Good luck!

User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3078 posts, RR: 20
Reply 22, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4001 times:

It is not that i am discouraging you. Just trying to let you know it is not a replacement for flying......The two jobs are different....

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineEx52tech From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 559 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3992 times:

Look, I laid out that little rant of mine because there are alot of people in positions of authority that will abuse it. I never compromised my skills or good judgement for the sake of the company, or some managers false impression that we might be buddies.

I just wanted to warn you that what I was telling you happens more than you might think. I worked for two major airlines (U.S. carriers) and did 4yrs in the USAF, so after 24+ years and two airlines I have seen the industry transition into something very different than it was.

If you have fabrication in your blood, then heavy structures work will be your utopia, those guys always impressed the hell out of me, making something out of nothing.

If you are good with your tools and are somewhat of a motor-head, you will probably do good with engines and systems. Troubleshooting sick engines was always my favorite. Doing an EVC, or EV-BC trim, and Fuel Control trim on a JT-9 was always really satisfying, the CF-6s were pretty cool too.

If instruments and electronics are your thing, you will like being a conehead......er....ah....I mean an R&E.

But whatever you do, don't let anybody tell you can't do something, if you want it go for it. I moved away from the industry because I wanted to be my own boss. Always remember, pilots fly airplanes, mechanics make them fly!!



"Saddest thing I ever witnessed....an airplane being scrapped"
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 24, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 3986 times:

Quoting WestJetForLife (Reply 20):
As long as I don't get sucked into a turbine, crushed by gear bay doors or have a wing, tailplane or an engine fall on me, I'll be the happiest mechanic on the job.

Wait until you'll have to do the first blue (brown) water juobs.
Getting stuck in an A320 section 18 ripping out the sh#t tank, lying on the frames and stringers, almost suffocating under the face mask, with sh#t dripping on you from the disconnected pipes.

Jan


25 Post contains images MrFord : I read you loud and clear over that one... had to change my A/C compressor on my 3.0, said to myself "must not be that hard, plus, I can see it from
26 Post contains images Greasespot : Yeah nothing like spending 23 hours on the open ramp in Iqaluit chaning a B727 inboard flap assembly and sheet metal repair plus cables.........When i
27 WestJetForLife : I understand that this job isn't as "glamourous" as becoming a pilot, nor is it a major substitute, but who cares? Being a mechanic, whether you're f
28 Zvocio79 : how about working holydays, X-mas, New Years, etc etc etc once i worked on Dec 31st from 7am to 12am evalution flight included.
29 Zvocio79 : ok WestJet....read this: it aint gonna be busy, you have to put up with a bounch of people from different groups and they all want to get their job do
30 Mohavewolfpup : now I can change it in my sleep, that was when I was 12. aren't the 2.8's the ones in camaros? I heard of a engine GM made that is such a pain in the
31 WestJetForLife : Well, sir. I appreciate that very much. You gave me an insight that is probably going to be the most useful in my future career. Getting the job done
32 Greasespot : You do. You are basically calling it a substitute....See your below starting question. I I can only answer on what is asked and the information given
33 777WT : They can only advise...if they tell you to sign it off so the plane can be dispatched, you tell them "no" and they have to abide by it. Because it's
34 Dougloid : Where Exactly Is That? a play in one act This actually happened. The names have been changed to protect the guilty. The scene is a small farmhouse on
35 WestJetForLife : Thank you all for your insight. It was all greatly appreciated. I still want to become a mechanic, and I will strive hard to become one, all because I
36 Turbonytro : Westjet this is lengthy but read it! I'm 35. I got into sales out of high school. My childhood was nothing but airplanes since I had 2 uncles with air
37 Zvocio79 : Just like you, people do what they like and like what they do.........despite the difference in work conditions I like airlines better, not to get sc
38 Turbonytro : Zvocio79 That kind of work must be AWSOME! I feel what you're saying. The pure electricity and power that you feel on a ramp like that has to be incre
39 WestJetForLife : I know people have their preferences, but really? Is there really any good paying jobs as pilots or mechanics out there that didn't get where they wer
40 HAWK21M : Take some time.Ponder over what your positives are.It'll help you make a good choice. regds MEL
41 Post contains images MrFord : Yeah, the (or one of the, in the early 80's) base engine of the Camaro, but also Cavalier, 6000's, FWD Grand Prix, name them. Not that bad to work on
42 Zvocio79 : Do it for love, people that work in aviation do it becuase the love the art of it....seen the 5:30am flight leaving on time is great satisfaction, so
43 WestJetForLife : I really don't care for money when it comes to work. As long as the bills are paid, there's food on the table and a roof over our head, I'm happy. Su
44 Post contains images Nonfirm : I would say just do it.The industry is in a down state now but when it gets good it is a great job to have.As far as they money and the hours they wil
45 WestJetForLife : I am going to do it, and I am going to be successful. No matter what everyone else says, I can and will be a good mechanic. Maybe one of these days, I
46 Dougloid : Well, it's a different world than being a pilot...which is OK. I've never been a pilot but I've known a lot of them, they're a mixed bag. A lot of th
47 Post contains links CanadianNorth : http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/maintenance/AARPB/AME/MRating.htm If you love airplanes and this list doesn't scare you away, I'd say have at er. I
48 Post contains images HAWK21M : Strong words.......Remember them when the going gets tough. Best of Luck. regds MEL
49 BAe146QT : Forgive the repost - I just feel it's important.[Edited 2007-01-09 12:45:15]
50 HAWK21M : In other words.No Shortcuts,& Follow the rules. regds MEL
51 Post contains images MD11Engineer : Greasespot, I just watched a documentary on German TV about the Mounties in Iqaluit (they also showed the airport). There seeem to be a lot of nice p
52 Jutes85 : You should also look into the military. We are currently looking for techs and the training would help you get a jump into the civy world if you choo
53 WestJetForLife : Yeah, I'm considering of joining the reserves at 17 and I may consider training with the military. Jutes, you actually have a great idea! Thank you ki
54 Lucky42 : Hello, I have a question your eyesight should not keep you from a pilot career as long as you are not going military. In the civilian world if you ha
55 Dougloid : TYou're on the Dougloid honor roll. Right on, brother. You got that right. We used to get a certain number of pireps from people who wanted to take t
56 WestJetForLife : Well, sir, I have a condition called searching nystagmus, which means my eye(s) can't focus properly. My left eye can't focus, which means my right e
57 Post contains images HAWK21M : Well said.Im gonna tell them this Tonight regds MEL
58 ReidYYZ : While the downside is well documented here and usually I'm one to contribute, there is some good stuff. With the shitty -25 deg temps, six months late
59 ReidYYZ : Sorry, meant EA401. The message you were about to post is too short and probably not of any higher value to the topic at hand. You should think long a
60 CanadianNorth : I have another few from recent experience... - Be prepaired to crawl into your assigned hole and "make it work", you don't get far at all if you give
61 MD11Engineer : I've learned over the years that happiness is an empty ramp.... Jan
62 Post contains images HAWK21M : Very True. Although it could also mean theres an AOG someplace else regds MEL
63 Post contains links BoeingFixer : Hi Nik, A word of caution on Military Training. Transport Canada has made it difficult for an ex-Military tech to obtain their AME. Keep in mind that
64 HAWK21M : Very Similiar out here.Qualified personnell have Approvals in service.After they quit can they Get Endorsed on their licence for Commercial type. reg
65 WestJetForLife : Well, I've been thinking it over, and I decided that the military wouldn't be the best route for me to go if I want to work fixing civil aircraft. I w
66 Jutes85 : While you are correct, not all companies look for an AME liscense. Our current techs that are retiring, and there ALOT of them, are getting job offer
67 BoeingFixer : That's great if you're going to some place like L3, Cascade, Bombardier etc.. working on major overhaul lines where you're not directly signing out t
68 HAWK21M : Does the Armed forces not have a Mandatory service period. regds MEL
69 Jutes85 : In the regs, your first contract is 3 years.
70 WestJetForLife : Another reason why I probably won't be joining the forces for my aircraft mechanic training. I want to use 2-3 years after SAIT to work my way up in
71 Dougloid : You'll find out that the military mind and the civilian mind operate differently, too. The overarching goal in the military world is readiness. Cost
72 Jutes85 : I hope you have the money for it, cause you will need it. BTW, what I do is nothing close to the Military of what your gf or family thinks of. Sure I
73 WestJetForLife : Well, even though that does sound good, I'd rather go civillian, but that's just my personal opinion. I just feel that civilian mechanics is more of
74 Jutes85 : Whatever you choose, good luck. SAIT/NAIT along with BCIT are among the top schools in the country, you should have no trouble finding a job afterword
75 BoeingFixer : Actually the only aircraft tech courses NAIT has are for Structures and Avionics. SAIT has the full AME course. Cheers, John
76 HAWK21M : How many contracts are there in totality. regds MEL
77 Jutes85 : All depends on what they offer you. Now what they are doing is offering you the 25 year contract that will take you into your pension, after your fir
78 HAWK21M : So are you saying that the 1st contract is Mandatory & the others optional. regds MEL
79 Jutes85 : No. During basic training, you can quit anytime, same goes for your trade training, although it will be harder (you will need a good reason) and a lo
80 WestJetForLife : Yes. I checked that SAIT is one of the only schools east of BCIT that offers the full AME course. It makes things convenient, especially since the co
81 Post contains images Jutes85 : lawl. I work for a living.
82 WestJetForLife : Ahh, I see you're an enlisted, eh Jutes? Question regarding military AME: would I be given a chance to become an officer or would I stay NCO? Appreci
83 Jutes85 : You can always go into officer later if you choose to, but you won't be working on any jets.
84 HAWK21M : Would that mean Supervision only as Manager. regds MEL
85 Pope : My tip - start with the basics: Rightee tightee, leftee loosee. Everything else derives from that!
86 Jutes85 : It means usually sitting behind a desk.
87 HAWK21M : You must be bored. regds MEL
88 Jutes85 : I don't sit behind a desk though. But yes, I get bored sometimes.
89 HAWK21M : I still don't get it.Whats the Job description like. regds MEL
90 Jutes85 : For NCM's, working on the jet if you are below the rank of Sgt. If you are a officer, you get a desk job, unless you are a pilot.
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