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Is Being A CSA That Difficult? My Story  
User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 4881 times:

* If this is in the wrong forum, please move it, thanks!*

I'll keep this brief. Its been one year since I left OH, and to this day I keep asking the topic question "is being CSA really that hard?" I have told this story many times, I'll keep it brief, it could (and did) go on for many many pages if I were to type it out in detail.
Here is my story.
In February of 2006, I went to a walk in interview with OH. To keep my privacy, I won't say which airport. I got the job and was shipped off to training at CVG. The training consisted a lot of creating PNRs and printing boarding passes. I got back to my station and the first few days were "just stand and watch". Everyday turned out to be an IROP day. I was told "it must be you, its never like this". The two weeks I was there, only one day went "as planned". There was never time for training, "we'll train another day" said my trainer. Moving the jetway took a lot of practice as well, I came close to damaging the aircraft thus I had a lot of guide "a little lower, ok to the right a little more" My second day I was told to tag bags. What I didn't know was those little things with the number on it (receipt) meant something and it had to go on the ticket jacket. Two or three customers didn't get theirs. The computer was ok, when things went smooth, great! When there was a bump, I'd call my supervisor over or someone that knew more and (s)he would punch in a line of code and the task would be finished leaving me in the dark-- there was no time to stop and teach when there was a line of 100 or so people in front of you.

My job at the gate was to put pink tags on the bags the customers wanted to gate-check and to either list off the seat numbers while the other person put it in the computer or vice versa. I never did it on my own, I wanted to, I wanted to do it on my own with him looking over my shoulder to prevent errors, that how I learn, he didn't understand. Everyday it felt like my first day, and it shouldn't have. I couldn't do simple task, I was asked to do something and I said I'm new and I'd get my supervisor, the customer (who happened to be a member) said "ok, why don't you print me out a receipt, thats easy enough") I didn't know how, I told my supervisor who then told me to go help a disabled woman down the jetway and the customer flipped and said that I just left, I didn't. I got heat for that, but I made sure to tell my supervisor what happened.

I was told one day that "the next day" I'd run the gate on my own, i couldn't do that I wasn't prepared. I said I'd prefer to do it with him in the background, he said well there is a radio. I knew that plane wouldn't get off the ground and I'd have 50 pissed off passengers down my throat. I went home and cried, yeah a 19 year old so shook up, and wrote my two weeks notice, and handed it in the next day, it was too much for me. The poor training, i needed to have knowledge to answer the customers and I didn't have that, i hated it.
We came to an agreement I wouldn't stay the two weeks, it wasn't wort it and I said I shouldn't be paid as OH was (still is?) in financial trouble.

One year later, I'd like to get back into the aviation industry. The most convent area would be CSA again. I would like to become an F/A (short-haul) and would like to be home a good amount of time. Was my experience a fluke? Are there better training programs? B6 is hiring and its temping, I just don't want a deja vue. Like I said, this was hard to write on this website, full of aviation enthusiast (vs telling non enthusiasts aka friends and family) so please go easy. You can e-mail me as well : ParadisA330@gmail.com If you need any clarification or would like more info please say so, like I said it was really brief.
Thanks again,
Andre

[Edited 2007-01-08 22:21:23]

28 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 4868 times:

Well, one agent I knew for a commuter airline came back to the counter after launching their last departure of the day. There was a large man at the counter and he demanded to be put on that flight.

My friend told him that it had already departed and then smiled as public service employees are expected to do.

The would-be customer said: "Don't smile at me or I'll knock you through that wall!"

There is a good interview question in that: How do you respond?



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 4833 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 1):

There is a good interview question in that: How do you respond?

Stop smiling, floor him, start grinning  Smile nah I do jest.

I don't know the answer to that one chief, but thats why I have such an enormous respect for the CSAs - although truth be told we were always trying to push the problem passengers to each other  Wink

Andre, sounds like you had a really rough time with most probably some really crappy company. my best advice is don't give up, just get back in the field again. If you want to be a CSA again then good for you, if you want to become an FA then great, I'd love to help you out but that job is slightly different on this side of the pond.

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 4826 times:

I've seen some really awful days on the eastern seaboard. Snowstorms can close every airport in ten states. Thunderstorms can close airports and jam all flights onto just a couple of routes.

On such days we, the flight crew, were somewhat inconvenienced. There were times when we didn't get to where we expected to spend the night - even when that was back at our domicile and we were supposed to go into days off. But the safety net for us was always flight time/duty time limitations and we knew, sooner or later we'd get to a hotel.

Always when this happened I was glad I didn't have to deal with the greatly inconvenienced travelling public. I've seen exhausted, harried agents with lines stretching out of sight in front of their positions and very little to offer any of these passengers. My hat is off to every last one of you. I felt (a tiny bit) guilty for sneaking past on my way to the hotel van at the end of such a day.

Dispatchers too. We, the crew had only to worry about ourselves. I have been a dispatcher and related positions at smaller outfits but I cannot imagine having two hundred airplanes and crews out of position. Amazing work they do, untangling all that.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17041 posts, RR: 66
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4771 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 5):
Always when this happened I was glad I didn't have to deal with the greatly inconvenienced travelling public. I've seen exhausted, harried agents with lines stretching out of sight in front of their positions and very little to offer any of these passengers. My hat is off to every last one of you. I felt (a tiny bit) guilty for sneaking past on my way to the hotel van at the end of such a day.

Indeed. I would rather deal with pros than with Joe Public any day of the week. On paper, my customers are pros. But sometimes I wonder...



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineGQfluffy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4712 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Thread starter):
Was my experience a fluke? Are there better training programs?

Yes and no. It sounds as if you recieved jackshat for training, which is wrong. You should've told your manager who assigned you to run that gate by yourself that you really didn't get much training, and you are having problems with running things by yourself and ask again if someone could be there with you. I'm sorry you had to walk away from the industry. It's a very fast, steep, and hard learning curve, and I can guarantee the first month or two is rough. But things become repeditive, and common-place, then everything is done with ease. Yes, there will be times you screw up and make a mistake or two, but we all do it, and trust me, it's sometimes that you'll learn from. Sure, you'll always have rude, cranky, and idiotic passengers to deal with, but you just smile, follow policy, and do your best; you'll eventualy build up that wall under which you can withstand everything they spit out at you and smile back. Big grin If you are thinking about getting back at it, GO FOR IT!  thumbsup 

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 1):
The would-be customer said: "Don't smile at me or I'll knock you through that wall!"

There is a good interview question in that: How do you respond?

That's easy. I would smile, and say "Sir, you have two options-
1. You take one step over this counter and I'll call security. Then you, the security guard, and I can sit down and discuss the evening and what needs to be done.

OR

2. I'll do my best to take care of you and get you out of here as soon as possible.

Maybe that's the wrong answer, but regardless of how much (this airline) pays me, it's not enough to have to put up with passengers who act in this manner."

I'll bet you'll get them to crack a smile, and that answer will put you on the top of the 2nd interview apps pile. Big grin


User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4649 times:

Quoting GQfluffy (Reply 7):
You should've told your manager who assigned you to run that gate by yourself that you really didn't get much training, and you are having problems with running things by yourself and ask again if someone could be there with you.

I tried, I told him a few times, all he said was "no, you need to do it, we'll give you a radio". I don't think the station agent was there, she wasnt there very often.


User currently offlineJkudall From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 615 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4547 times:

I can feel for you. When I first started working for the airline I am with, I was on the ramp, which was fun. But I wanted to learn the CS side of things, so I transferred. I too felt like I was under trained to begin with. I was lucky enough to have my on the job training right during spring break (at a hub). Every single flight was oversold. You couldn't find protection for people, it was a nightmare. Needless to say, I was pushed out of the way a lot so my trainer could do what needed to be done to get pax where they needed to go.

As soon as I got on my own, I struggled. I thought many times about going back to the ramp. But I didn't, and eventually I became comfortable with the job.

A while later, when I worked full time at the airline, I became a station trainer and sub-supervisor. I soon realized every person I trained went through the same struggles and felt the same way as I did about not being ready to do the job on their own after training. Fortunately my airline won't force you to work on your own if you and your trainer don't feel you are ready. I'm sorry you're airline obviously didn't have the same policy and definitely lacked proper training.

But I will say I think people learn the most when they don't have a trainer looking over their shoulder all the time. That way they can learn from their mistakes instead of always asking another agent how something is done. For example, people always forget computer entries for certain things, and after trying a few different commands in the computer, they eventually get the right one and the boarding pass comes out.

I'd say it takes a few months to get to a point where an agent feels comfortable to handle most all situations. Everyone goes through the feelings of "not being good enough for the job". It's normal.

For those of you reading who haven't had the fun experience of being an airline customer service agent, it isn't easy. The computer skills for the reservation system we use is like learning a foreign language (its not windows based). The customer interaction part of the job can be good and sometimes bad. I've had passengers cuss at me like there was no tomorrow, I've had passengers throw things at me, threaten me, and have been close to having a passenger physically assault me. I've worked IROP days where there was literally no room to walk in the concourse without touching someone else and I had a line at my counter from when I clocked in at 3pm until I clocked out at 2:30 am (shift normally ends at 11). I couldn't even step away to use the restroom (not that I needed to use it since I hadn't had anything to drink). I don't like telling people they aren't going to be able to make it to their destination for another three days or tell people they aren't going to be home for Christmas. But it's part of the job.

But for me, the few really positive experiences with passengers where I feel like I was really able to help someone sure makes up for all the negative experiences. There's nothing like finding a letter in your box from a passenger saying how much they appreciate how you helped them. The ability to jump on a plane whenever I want and go wherever I want is a nice perk too.

Again, I am sorry about your bad experience. But I would encourage you to have a go at it again. A job in the airline industry is not like many other professions. It takes time to feel comfortable working there. Anyone who says the job is easy from the get go doesn't work at a real airline. And maybe CS is not your niche. You might even try just doing ramp. I loved the ramp. It was good exercise too. If you really want to be an FA, go for it.


User currently offlineTurkee From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4519 times:

I spent some time as a CSA for QF before moving into my current position with another airline in operations. I really feel that customer service agents aren't treated with enough respect by a) pax and b) crew. Having to deal with the most fundamental, and sometimes most socially difficult, situations the airline finds itself in is quite a challenge. Doing it with a smile 99% of the time is nearly impossible.

I too have been in similar situations to those described above - verbally abused by displaced pax, physically threatened by offloaded pax (who are sometimes drunk), lost baggage, aircraft gone mech, weather cancellations, etc etc. None of them compare to the happiness that you can see at the arrivals gate around Christmas time though, with families and little kids and all that. That truly does bring a smile to my face.

I totally agree with the statement by Jkudall regarding learning the commands used in reservation systems - it is quite complex, past the basic entries. Check-in, departure control, reservations, ticketing and load control all require different commands and it is pretty overwhelming for new starters.

Plus, we all learn from mistakes that we make. (In my time as a CSA, I lost count how many times pax wandered off before I realised they are missing their baggage claim sticker for their ticket wallet, so don't panic about that!) I know my manager purposefully let me go and make the mistake before correcting me, so I understood next time how to recognise what the mistake was, and how to fix it. That was very valuable training every single time it happened, and my manager did not hold it against me. It is simply a learning experience. I still make mistakes every day! That is one of the real airline experiences though - no two days are the same, and therefore you are always learning new things.

It is unfortunate you were not provided with the training that you require. If you really enjoy working in aviation though, there are other areas to be involved in if you don't feel you fit into the CSA area. I would certainly recommend trying other airlines, and above all being honest with your employer. If you have a good manager, I would like to think they would provide you with whatever you need to get the job done.

It doesn't sound like your experience is typical of all airlines. I hope your next aviation experience is a better one  Smile

Don't give up  Smile


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17041 posts, RR: 66
Reply 9, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4508 times:

I don't want to be the negative one, but if you don't like working at a certain company, find another job. You seem to be doing this.

Complaining about your job and expecting the company to change is unrealistic. The company is bigger and less flexible.

I am quite certain that you can find a good CSA job in the industry. You just have to be prepared for dissapointment and frustration on the way there.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineCs03 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 413 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4430 times:
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You should consider applying for CSA openings for other carriers at your local airport. I doubt the type of "training" you received with OH would be the reality with other airlines. You seem to have the aviation "bug", so keep at it!

User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 4113 times:

I work as a PSA (we're called passenger service agents here in the UK) for a big multinational handling agent, and I absolutely love my job, but like all things in aviation, I think it takes a while to understand how the airport works, which is a very daunting experience. My training was three weeks at the airport, where I was taught to use the check-in computer system (LDCS), do manual check-in, deal with difficult passengers, health & safety, learning about individual airlines' policies and one or two other things. Then I had a week of job shadowing the experienced PSAs before being let out on my own. I personally found that I enjoyed the independence of being able to do things my way, but to have had nearly a month of seeing how the job should have been done. The job is very challenging, you're paid low wages, given minimum benefits - especially if you work for a handling agent as opposed to an airline, and often management are not supportive if you slip up, even unintentionally. However, there are some real benefits to the job; working with planes, being able to meet people from around the world, having great colleagues, no two days or two flights are ever the same etc. Being a PSA is one of the least glamorous jobs in aviation - if you can still find any glamour - but it really sounds like you had a bad experience, working for a company which did not value good training or team building.

User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 4 days ago) and read 3935 times:

Sorry to drag this to the top, but I am still worried about my resume. Currently this is the "Work experience":
[ 8/03-Present ]Hannaford City, State
Customer Service Associate
Bagging groceries for customers, retrieving shopping carts, and other chores. Often used to train new customer Service Associates.

[2/06-3/06] Delta Connection Comair City, State
Customer Service Agent

Checking in passengers. Running the gate


I am worried that they'll see the short time span and throw my resume and application away. Anything I can do about this? Anyway to shine it up?


User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3888 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Reply 12):
I am worried that they'll see the short time span and throw my resume and application away. Anything I can do about this? Anyway to shine it up?

I wouldn't be too woried esp. since you're fairly young (look at me talking like a geezer), but one resume strategy that is advocated by some camps is to list acheivements/job functions as a collection rather than by employer.

Don't know if it would work for you, but it might be worth trying to see how it would look --

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3844 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Reply 12):

I am worried that they'll see the short time span and throw my resume and application away. Anything I can do about this? Anyway to shine it up?

Dates are dates, it doesn't look good to a new employer if you're trying to hide something or lie about something that didn't happen. Be honest, and if they ask why you were there so short tell them what happened but turn it into a positive experience. Tell them you didn't receive adequate training but you were trying to learn everything you could to do your job. It didn't work out, so you left... The employer will respect you more for that than making stuff up on the resume--- remember, these people know what they're doing and will pick up on it in an instant...

BTW if you're so worried about people finding out which airport you worked for, you may want to change your profile a bit, and also take it out of your myspace  Wink


User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3833 times:

ha ha lol. Yeah never thought about the profile and myspace. Ah well, its been a yr and I don't think any of them are on here, are they?
Anyways, here is the full resume:


Postal Address Phone
E-mail paradisA330@gmail.com
Andre Last Name
Objective Experience in the aviation field.
Work experience [ 8/03-Present ] Hannaford City, State
Customer Service Associate
Bagging groceries for customers, retrieving shopping carts, and other chores. Often used to train new customer Service Associates.

[2/06-3/06] Delta Connection Comair City, State
Customer Service Agent

Checking in passengers. Running the gate
Education [ 8/00-6/04 ] High School City, VT
Graduated

[ 8/04-Present] College State, VT
Credits earned: 43
Major: Liberal Arts.

References
3 Managers from Hananford listed

Volunteer experience Name of children's camp [August, 2004]
Worked with children age 5-10, supporting them in sports and cooking activities.


And, thanks for telling me what to say, I have had that planned for sometime, I am just worried that I won't even get an interview with the big OH deal. Then again, they will always question it if everything else looks fine? I just assumed one glance at my resume on the application and throw it in the "trash". Would it help (or hurt?) to add a line right under OH and put
"Reason for leaving: Didn't receive adequate training . " Or somewhere along those lines. Many companies ask that in the application anyways.

[Edited 2007-02-21 19:25:02]

[Edited 2007-02-21 19:26:52]

User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3815 times:

If you are only sending a speculative CV, I would leave it as it currently is, but it's always worth sending a covering letter as well, indicating your desire for the job, and perhaps there you might explain your experience with Delta Connection. You are clearly at least a high school graduate, have plenty of customer service and volunteering experience, as well as someone who is studying hard for a college diploma - as far as I can tell, you have the right levels of experience, if not more, for working as a passenger service agent The cover letter should only heighten this.

User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3761 times:

Yeah, I plan on deffently writing a cover letter.

User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3752 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Reply 17):

Also remember that airlines are hiring people as CSA's with just a HS diploma and the ability to display good customer service (obviously). The fact that you have airline experience (even if it is minor) should put you ahead of others.


User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3653 times:

Yeah, I was just told not to say anything about the bad training and pay by a F/A I've been emailing. What should I do? The question WILL come up, i know it will. She said not to be negative but well, there is no way around it is there?

User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3639 times:

Without a doubt don't slate the training skills of the competitor. You can reveal potentially that the training programme did not fit in with your needs or expectations, but it's very unprofessional to slate both a corporation and their training programme. It may potentially also disadvantage you, as the new company you're interviewing may think that the same thing could happen if they hire you.

I'm not sure how tough the competition is for these jobs in the USA, but certainly in Europe these jobs have a very high turnover rate of staff, so if you have some qualifications, experience and can at least mumble some English, you should be able to get the job no problems.

When I was interviewing for these jobs, as with any, the best thing to do is to demonstrate the kind of personal skills you'd have if you were doing this job. Professional, friendly and good under pressure.


User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2455 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3628 times:

Yeah, I dont know how to tell I left the other airline though. I did leave due to poor training and bad pay.

User currently offlineSQB7E From New Zealand, joined Feb 2007, 71 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 6 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 3603 times:

I am a checkin agent some of the time. Rude passengers need to remember that we do assign their seats. Least desirable seating can come in handy when you have got an annoying pax!!  Wink

User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1878 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (7 years 6 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 3530 times:

Andre, I started as a cross utilized agent when I was 18, and since then have done other things for the airlines including flight attendant. I will tell you that CS is tough at first. You have to learn to take initiative. Your trainers at regional airlines are typically going to be lifers, which is one of my entire separate theories about regional airlines. I was confident with half the reservations system the first day out because of the training I received. However I will say the other half was a lot of stamina, and just skills that had to be perfected on the job in situations like, three people call in sick and I was the only CS agent at the airport working a turn. Or your delayed 6 hours on the night when 30 pax have international connections, that are oversold for the next two weeks, and other agents are screwing things up like taking invalid 120.20s from other airlines, weather isn't getting better, and I still have to finish that paper for geology 302 at 9 tomorrow morning. It used to really stress me out, But then I begun to really get a great respect for the operation in its entirety. Its juts a big dance thats trying to be coordinated. You have to let things roll off. I'm glad I was a gate agent, I think about my friends, and what it was like working there all the time still to this day, and really miss it. When I was a flight attendant, I remember receiving the post flight paperwork as the CS agent prepared to close the MCD, I'd say, "How's your night goin?" "Oh real stressful, you know?" "yeah...I know." The most gratifying thing to this day is that I can say that I learned all that stuff, top to bottom and was able to perform, to what I felt as, the best of my personal ability. And complete the entire operation, even If I was working a flight as the only CS/ Ops agent on duty. There are some great skills to learn in airline CS. If theres anything you'd like to talk about on a more detailed basis about my experiences, my contact is available in my profile, thanks, and goodluck!

User currently offlineJER757 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 350 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 3418 times:

I started working at an airport when I was 15, pushing wheelchairs. I have then sinced moved up the ranks to check in and dispatcher (UK version) through 3 different companies. The only official training I have received was for my qualifications to sign off loadsheets (a legal requirement for the airlines we handle). Other than that all of my training was on the job. Although the first few days/weeks of each new position may seem daunting, you quickly become accostomised to the perculiarities of each job. I have never had any issues telling a supervisor that I have had a problem with a situation... i guess thats just my luck. But you need to have the confidence to say so. OH may have not had the best support system, but most airlines or handling agents will have people you can turn to if you're having trouble... and they're invaluable.

Don't give up your ambition to be involved in aviation... it is truly an amazing field to work in. You'll have a cr*p day one day, but a brilliant day the next. Seeing a plane load of 200+ passengers push back, knowing you've helped them on their way is a great feeling, especially if a couple of them have actually appreciated the work you do, and said thanks... which actually happens from time to time!

Don't throw it all in just because of one bad experience... whether you go for CSA or FA you will have a great time once you get settled into the right job. Just accept the bad and remember the good. If you truly have your heart in it, it will be a great life...



Gale force fog... don't you love it?
25 Folov : This reminds me of my first day on the job. I was just coming in to fill up some paperwork, when i was handed a tie and told to go down and help. I wa
26 N710PS : Like many others in their airline career. It is what you make of it really. I enjoyed it very much and it keeps you busy. I made alot of freinds with
27 ILOVEA340 : THe regional I worked for didn;t really have much in the way of official training. You would be showed things once or twice and then you were expected
28 ClassicLover : Not to be mean at all... It sounds like you were unprepared and part of that could be your age, part of it could just be you as a person. I get this
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