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Photo I.D. And On-Line Check In  
User currently offlineThai744 From Australia, joined Jun 2004, 300 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3548 times:
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I don't get this...

When e-ticketing first started up (at least domestically in Australia) you needed to show photo I.D. when checking in to prove that you were there person whos name was on the ticket.

I flew Virgin Blue twice last week (with checked luggage) domestically in Australia, and both times was asked to produce I.D. at the check-in desk whilst dropping off my bag. (I had checked-in online that morning).

This week I flew Qantas domestically twice with only cabin baggage and again used on-line check in. After checking-in online, the printout of my boarding pass told me to proceed straight to the departure gate, which I did.

With no checked baggage, my I.D. was never checked. I'm not sure if this is the same procedure on Virgin Blue.

So does this mean that if I check-in on line, someone else could use my ticket as long as they didn't have checked baggage?

It seems a bit of a lapse to me, not checking I.D. for people without checked baggage - especially in this day-and-age when we are supposed to be more security concious - particularly as far as civil aviation is concerned.

Any thoughts???

[Edited 2007-01-22 11:31:53]

[Edited 2007-01-22 11:32:31]

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3544 times:

I can only speak for the US, but if you check in online or in a kiosk here ID is checked before security and compared with your face + the name on the boarding pass. My experience in Europe is that ID is checked at least while boarding.

Not checking ID at all does seem a bit odd.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3537 times:

I regularly travel on domestic flights in the UK with BA between London and Manchester, and always use on-line check in as I only ever need a small rollercase which can go in the cabin.

I have never, ever shown ID to prove who I am on any such flight.

Strangely I once took Jet2 on the LGW-MAN route (also on-line check in, hand luggage only) and they did check photo ID at the gate.  Confused



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineThai744 From Australia, joined Jun 2004, 300 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3537 times:
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Just to add something... I asked about this to the QF girl at the service desk this morning at the departure gate in ADL and she said, "no, if you check in online and don't have checked baggage just proceed straight to the boarding gate and wait for the boarding call."

User currently offlineThai744 From Australia, joined Jun 2004, 300 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3533 times:
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I just sent an email regarding this to QF via their website. It will be interesting (at least to me!) so see how they reply.

If they do, I will post the reply here on this thread.


User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3499 times:

The no-ID policy allows this sort of thing:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pc4I0lNsgiU

In all seriousness, so what? Matching your ticket to your ID is all about revenue protection for the airlines. ID checks do nothing to enhance security, especially if the real terrorists are kept off the watch lists, as they are in the US (because we don't want them to know that we know who they are).

BTW: In the US you can fly domestically w/o ID as long as you don't check bags.


User currently offlineIahflyr From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3483 times:

Quoting Analog (Reply 5):
BTW: In the US you can fly domestically w/o ID as long as you don't check bags.

That is quite intersting, how do you get past the TSA with no picture ID? Last time I flew a week ago, you did have to go through the security checkpoint when going from the parking garage to the airplane......now once through security you are correct.



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3453 times:

Quoting Iahflyr (Reply 6):

That is quite intersting, how do you get past the TSA with no picture ID? Last time I flew a week ago, you did have to go through the security checkpoint when going from the parking garage to the airplane......now once through security you are correct.

You get a secondary screening, but the TSA will allow you to fly. It's part of the secret law/regulation that we're not allowed to know but applies to us, a policy just upheld by the SCOTUS.  Angry


User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3432 times:

I'm sure I'll try that next time!  Smile


Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3431 times:

Quoting IAHFLYR (Reply 8):
I'm sure I'll try that next time! Smile

Better leave early. AFAIK your bags will be fully searched, as will you. You'll be given lots of grief. BTW: I've never tried this.

When will you be at IAH? Perhaps I can watch the process. I'll be there in 2 days.  Smile


User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 10, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3381 times:

Quoting Analog (Reply 9):
When will you be at IAH? Perhaps I can watch the process. I'll be there in 2 days

 alert 

I'm at IAH right now!!!

I hate to disappoint but I will NOT be attempting this, don't want to anyone to find my secret compartment in laptop where it contains my ID!!  Smile



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3361 times:

Quoting IAHFLYR (Reply 10):

I hate to disappoint but I will NOT be attempting this, don't want to anyone to find my secret compartment in laptop where it contains my ID!! Smile

They might discover your secret identity.

I've always wanted to use one of these at the checkpoint (no. that is not me, but I have one with my photo that is still valid):



It is a government issued photo ID that just happens to look like a bad fake ID.


User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3353 times:

Quoting Analog (Reply 11):
It is a government issued photo ID that just happens to look like a bad fake ID.

You're killing me!!! Oh wait, all gov't issued ID's are like that aren't they????

In fact, I have an ID issued from the above mentioned outfit, scary things happen when you show that rather than a passport or drivers license to get past the TSA folk. I've had them even ask for a second ID at of all places DCA! Too funny



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3345 times:

Quoting IAHFLYR (Reply 12):
In fact, I have an ID issued from the above mentioned outfit,

The Government of the Cook Islands? It's a real driver's license. I took a road test to get it.


User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 14, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3344 times:

Quoting Analog (Reply 13):
The Government of the Cook Islands? It's a real driver's license. I took a road test to get it.

no dude, the above mentioned gov't id



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineMoose135 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2301 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (7 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3283 times:

Quoting Analog (Reply 7):
Quoting Iahflyr (Reply 6):

That is quite intersting, how do you get past the TSA with no picture ID? Last time I flew a week ago, you did have to go through the security checkpoint when going from the parking garage to the airplane......now once through security you are correct.

You get a secondary screening, but the TSA will allow you to fly. It's part of the secret law/regulation that we're not allowed to know but applies to us, a policy just upheld by the SCOTUS.

This happened to a co-worker a few months back. Went on a business trip with the boss, and the boss' boss. Got to security, and realized his wallet was locked in the trunk of his car, at home. Yes, he went through secondary screening (and from what I'm told, he had a great time doing it  Smile ) On the way home, it was the same story (multiple times in fact - after checking in, they found there was no restaurant in that wing of the terminal, so they left, went through screening to get to the restaurant, and then again to get to their gate.) Our travel check list now includes reminding him to check that he has his ID with him.  Wink



KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 6 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3211 times:

Here in the UK, passengers who check in online are able to go straight to the security check point. At the check point, their printed boarding pass will be cross referenced with the photo i.d. (almost always government issued) and the passenger presenting themselves, to indeed check that the person who is presenting themselves is who they claim to be. The boarding pass and i.d. is then checked again at the gate before boarding, albeit quicker to expidite the boarding process, whilst still checking you are who you say you are.

User currently offlinePER744 From Australia, joined Mar 2003, 405 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (7 years 6 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3183 times:

Presenting ID at check-in in Australia isn't much of a security measure anyway. Anyone is allowed to go through security, so that means the ticketed passenger could present ID at check-in and then hand their boarding pass to anyone to go through security.

I've checked in several times presenting just my Qantas Club card rather than any actual photo ID.


User currently offlineTurkee From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 6 months 5 days ago) and read 3146 times:

Quoting PER744 (Reply 17):
I've checked in several times presenting just my Qantas Club card rather than any actual photo ID.

When I was doing check-in for QF, we were told repeatedly to always ask for photo identification. However, I always got the impression, as did my co-workers, that QF management would prefer we keep QF frequent flyers and Qantas Club members happy by accepting their membership card instead of photo ID. Especially when kiosk check-in came along, management had a hard time selling the always-check-photo-ID line to check-in agents.

Quoting PER744 (Reply 17):
Presenting ID at check-in in Australia isn't much of a security measure anyway. Anyone is allowed to go through security, so that means the ticketed passenger could present ID at check-in and then hand their boarding pass to anyone to go through security.

Very true  checkmark 


User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 19, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3136 times:

Quoting Lite (Reply 16):
Here in the UK, passengers who check in online are able to go straight to the security check point. At the check point, their printed boarding pass will be cross referenced with the photo i.d. (almost always government issued) and the passenger presenting themselves, to indeed check that the person who is presenting themselves is who they claim to be. The boarding pass and i.d. is then checked again at the gate before boarding, albeit quicker to expidite the boarding process, whilst still checking you are who you say you are.

Not on domestic flights. Have never had my ID checked as you describe, at security or the gate.

(Edit: Except on Jet2!)

[Edited 2007-01-29 12:33:33]


I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3113 times:

It is common practise for all of the airline that I handle who have internet check-in, for passengers to present both their ID and their boarding pass at the gate, as well as at the security checkpoint. I'm surprised that isn't standard procedure.

User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 21, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3103 times:

Quoting Lite (Reply 20):
It is common practise for all of the airline that I handle who have internet check-in, for passengers to present both their ID and their boarding pass at the gate, as well as at the security checkpoint. I'm surprised that isn't standard procedure.

Well it certainly isn't standard for BA, BA Connect or bmi on domestic flights, I must have travelled on about 20 this year and never showed ID on any of them. Most sectors were LGW-MAN-LGW or LHR-MAN-LHR or SOU-MAN-SOU. I could have been anyone, or booked under any name.

Only on the one Jet2 flight I took LGW-MAN did they ask for ID (at the gate, while boarding). Strange how they need it, but BA don't, on the same route!



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 22, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3087 times:

Quoting Lite (Reply 20):
It is common practise for all of the airline that I handle who have internet check-in, for passengers to present both their ID and their boarding pass at the gate, as well as at the security checkpoint. I'm surprised that isn't standard procedure.

In the US I can't remember ever showing ID at the gate. The last time I show ID is at the entrance to the security line (with boarding pass).

The sequence in the US is:
- If check-in agent (always for International) - Show ID.
- Entry of security line: ID and boarding pass.
- After scanners: boarding pass.
- At the gate: boarding pass.

In the UK to the US:
- Check-in - Passport (and applicable entry documents for US).
- Entry of security line: boarding pass.
- Entry into staging area: passport and boarding pass.
- At the jetbridge: boarding pass.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinePER744 From Australia, joined Mar 2003, 405 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3062 times:

ID was checked at the gate in the US for a while following Sep 11, that was back when they also did the secondary screening at the gate. Every time I flew I'd have to wait until my group number was called to board, then they'd see my Australian passport and I'd be told I had to be searched, resulting in me being about the last person on the plane. Whilst annoying, the current TSA procedures are at least better than what they used to be.

In Canada they still check ID at the gate, including domestic flights.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 24, posted (7 years 6 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3046 times:

Quoting PER744 (Reply 23):
Every time I flew I'd have to wait until my group number was called to board, then they'd see my Australian passport and I'd be told I had to be searched, resulting in me being about the last person on the plane.

This one is great. Just because you are Australian you are more of a security risk? Talk about not dealing with actual security! US citizen was apparently safe? The TSA strikes again. I wish they taught the agents to actually look at and talk to people. Searching the bags is fine, but it's the person that does the deed.

I always find it ironic that I'm not allowed to consult for a couple of our defense contractor clients due to security regs (I am not a citizen of the US). To get my Green Card, I had to be background checked, interviewed, probed, x-rayed and so forth. My colleagues simply have to be born in the US. Who, I ask, is the greater security risk?



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 25, posted (7 years 6 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2998 times:

Quoting Rick767 (Reply 21):
Only on the one Jet2 flight I took LGW-MAN did they ask for ID (at the gate, while boarding). Strange how they need it, but BA don't, on the same route!

At EMA, we don't have separate departure channels for domestic and international, everybody proceeds to airside using the same security lanes. When a passenger presents themselves at the security checkpoint, they will be asked to show their boarding pass (if an online check-in boarding pass this will be scanned by security) and a valid form of i.d. If these are correct, they will then be allowed to join the queue to go to central search. Once the passenger gets to the gate, we make as a standard announcement after airline specific information that "passengers should please be in possession of their own boarding card with their passports open to the photographic identification page" or "passengers should please be in possession of their own boarding card and identification." When we rip the boarding card, we'll quickly scan the form of i.d.


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